Barry Schwartz studies the link between economics and psychology, offering startling insights into modern life.

Why you should listen

In his 2004 book The Paradox of Choice, Barry Schwartz tackles one of the great mysteries of modern life: Why is it that societies of great abundance -- where individuals are offered more freedom and choice (personal, professional, material) than ever before -- are now witnessing a near-epidemic of depression? Conventional wisdom tells us that greater choice is for the greater good, but Schwartz argues the opposite: He makes a compelling case that the abundance of choice in today's western world is actually making us miserable. 

Schwartz belives that Infinite choice is paralyzing and exhausting for the human psyche. It leads us to set unreasonably high expectations, question our choices before we even make them and blame our failures entirely on ourselves. His relatable examples, from consumer products (jeans, TVs, salad dressings) to lifestyle choices (where to live, what job to take, who and when to marry), underscore his central point that too much choice undermines happiness.

Schwartz's previous research has addressed morality, decision-making and the varied inter-relationships between science and society. Before Paradox he published The Costs of Living, which traces the impact of free-market thinking on the explosion of consumerism -- and the effect of the new capitalism on social and cultural institutions that once operated above the market, such as medicine, sports and the law. Both books level serious criticism of modern Western society, illuminating the under-reported psychological plagues of our time. But they also offer concrete ideas on addressing these problems, from a personal and societal level.

Schwartz is the author of the TED Book, Why We Work, and a professor of social theory at Swarthmore College.

What others say

“Whether choosing a health-care plan, choosing a college class or even buying a pair of jeans, Schwartz shows that a bewildering array of choices floods our exhausted brains, ultimately restricting instead of freeing us.” — Publisher’s Weekly

Barry Schwartz’s TED talks

More news and ideas from Barry Schwartz

Live from TED2020

Values reset: Notes from Session 2 of TED2020

May 29, 2020

There’s a theory that the shock we’re currently experiencing is intense enough to force a radical reset of our values — of how we are and how we act. In an idea-packed session 2 of TED2020, speakers from across disciplines and walks of life looked to this aspiration of a “values reset,” sharing new thinking […]

Continue reading
We humans

Got too much stuff? Try these 7 tips to help pare down

September 13, 2018

Most of us have no problem admitting we have more than we need. The difficulty lies in the next steps: How to get rid of it? What room to tackle first? Should we toss, regift, donate, recycle, repurpose, sell? It’s enough to drive a person to lie down and wait until the impulse to tidy passes. This gentle advice from TED speakers will help you look at the excess in your life, get rid of it, and restore some order to your space.

Continue reading
Science

How to be lucky in love

March 28, 2018

Being lucky in love isn't like being struck by lightning -- it’s a lot less random and painful. Psychologist Barry Schwartz and biological anthropologist Helen Fisher share their opinions on the subject.

Continue reading