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Lisa Kristine uses photography to expose deeply human stories.

Why you should listen

Lisa Kristine took an early interest in anthropology and 19th-century photographic printing techniques -- passions that have since predominated her work. In 1999, and again in 2000, she presented her photography at the State of the World Forum. In 2003, she published her first book, A Human Thread, capturing and "intimate and honest portrait of humanity." In 2007, her second book, This Moment, won the bronze metal at the Independent Publisher Book Awards. She also produced two documentary films to accompany each book -- exposing her techniques and the stories behind her photographs. In 2010, Kristine travelled the world in collaboration with Free the Slaves to document the harrowing lives of the enslaved. Slavery was published in 2010.

What others say

“Lisa Kristine’s sensitive and beautiful portrayal of isolated and distant peoples helps us to better appreciate the diversity of the world. She captures the sheer beauty of the differences in people and places and allows us to comprehend the shared nature of the human condition: its hope, its joy and its complexity.” — John C. Sweeney, Director of the United Nations

Lisa Kristine’s TED talk

More news and ideas from Lisa Kristine

In Brief

An ultra-low-cost online MBA launches today … and more news from TED speakers

March 15, 2016

  Shai Reshef’s nonprofit University of the People — which offers nearly tuition-free, accredited degrees online — today launches its first graduate degree, an MBA program in 12 courses. Although there are no tuition or textbook fees, there is a $200 testing fee per course, which means students can expect to pay $2,400 for their MBA (compare this to the average cost […]

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We humans

Gallery: What inequality looks like

June 3, 2014

We asked an international group of 12 artists, designers, photographers and activists to provide one image that encapsulates what inequality means to them -- and to explain their selection. The results are stunning and thought-provoking. Warning: some of them might make you cry.

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