playlist

TED deep cuts vol. 3

Sometimes, things get a little buried in our archive of 3,000+ TED Talks. Check out some great ones, unearthed for your viewing pleasure.

  1. 8:24
    Anirudh Sharma Ink made of air pollution

    What if we could capture pollution in the air around us and turn it into something useful? Inventor Anirudh Sharma shares how he created AIR-INK, a deep black ink that's made from PM 2.5 pollution. See how he hacked together a clever way to capture these tiny particles — and make the world just a little bit cleaner in the process.

  2. 15:33
    Trevor Copp and Jeff Fox Ballroom dance that breaks gender roles

    Tango, waltz, foxtrot ... these classic ballroom dances quietly perpetuate an outdated idea: that the man always leads and the woman always follows. That's an idea worth changing, say Trevor Copp and Jeff Fox, as they demonstrate their "Liquid Lead" dance technique along with fellow dancer Alida Esmail. Watch as Copp and Fox captivate and command the stage while boldly deconstructing and transforming the art of ballroom dance.

  3. 13:12
    Anna Rothschild Why you should love gross science

    What can we learn from the slimy, smelly side of life? In this playful talk, science journalist Anna Rothschild shows us the hidden wisdom of "gross stuff" and explains why avoiding the creepy underbelly of nature, medicine and technology closes us off to important sources of knowledge about our health and the world. "When we explore the gross side of life, we find insights that we never would have thought we'd find, and we even often reveal beauty that we didn't think was there," Rothschild says.

  4. 7:32
    Ibeyi "Valé" / "River"

    Blending traditional Yoruba culture with sharp modern songwriting, electro-soul duo (and twin sisters) Ibeyi play a transportive set of two songs: "Valé" and "River."

  5. 16:51
    Rogier van der Heide Why light needs darkness

    Lighting architect Rogier van der Heide offers a beautiful new way to look at the world — by paying attention to light (and to darkness). Examples from classic buildings illustrate a deeply thought-out vision of the play of light around us.

  6. 10:21
    Nora Atkinson Why art thrives at Burning Man

    Craft curator Nora Atkinson takes us on a trip to Nevada's Black Rock Desert to see the beautifully designed and participatory art of Burning Man, revealing how she discovered there what's often missing from museums: curiosity and engagement. "What is art for in our contemporary world if not this?" she asks.

  7. 14:17
    Li Wei Tan The fascinating science of bubbles, from soap to champagne

    In this whimsical talk and live demo, scientist Li Wei Tan shares the secrets of bubbles — from their relentless pursuit of geometric perfection to their applications in medicine and shipping, where designers are creating more efficient vessels by mimicking the bubbles created by swimming penguins. Learn more about these mathematical marvels and tap into the magic hidden in the everyday world.

  8. 13:59
    Jonathan Wilker What sticky sea creatures can teach us about making glue

    What if we could harness the sticking powers of sea creatures like mussels, oysters and barnacles, which refuse to budge even on wet, stormy coastlines? Dive into the wonderful world of animals that make their own glue and cement with scientist Jonathan Wilker — and preview some of the amazing things we can learn from how they do it.

  9. 17:51
    Paul Ewald Can we domesticate germs?

    Evolutionary biologist Paul Ewald drags us into the sewer to discuss germs. Why are some more harmful than others? How could we make the harmful ones benign? Searching for answers, he examines a disgusting, fascinating case: diarrhea.

  10. 6:48
    Keolu Fox Why genetic research must be more diverse

    Ninety-six percent of genome studies are based on people of European descent. The rest of the world is virtually unrepresented — and this is dangerous, says geneticist and TED Fellow Keolu Fox, because we react to drugs differently based on our genetic makeup. Fox is working to democratize genome sequencing, specifically by advocating for indigenous populations to get involved in research, with the goal of eliminating health disparities. "The research community needs to immerse itself in indigenous culture," he says, "or die trying."

  11. 12:59
    Amy Herman A lesson on looking

    Are you looking closely? Visual educator Amy Herman explains how to use art to enhance your powers of perception and find connections where they may not be apparent. Learn the techniques Herman uses to train Navy SEALs, doctors and crime scene investigators to convert observable details into actionable knowledge with this insightful talk.

  12. 12:49
    Fredros Okumu Why I study the most dangerous animal on earth — mosquitoes

    What do we really know about mosquitoes? Fredros Okumu catches and studies these disease-carrying insects for a living — with the hope of crashing their populations. Join Okumu for a tour of the frontlines of mosquito research, as he details some of the unconventional methods his team at the Ifakara Health Institute in Tanzania have developed to target what has been described as the most dangerous animal on earth.

  13. 11:55
    Anjali Tripathi Why Earth may someday look like Mars

    Every minute, 400 pounds of hydrogen and almost 7 pounds of helium escape from Earth's atmosphere into outer space. Astrophysicist Anjali Tripathi studies the phenomenon of atmospheric escape, and in this fascinating and accessible talk, she considers how this process might one day (a few billion years from now) turn our blue planet red.

  14. 16:33
    Thomas Goetz It's time to redesign medical data

    Your medical chart: it's hard to access, impossible to read — and full of information that could make you healthier if you just knew how to use it. At TEDMED, Thomas Goetz looks at medical data, making a bold call to redesign it and get more insight from it.

  15. 13:12
    Stephen Burt Why people need poetry

    "We're all going to die — and poems can help us live with that." In a charming and funny talk, literary critic Stephen Burt takes us on a lyrical journey with some of his favorite poets, all the way down to a line break and back up to the human urge to imagine.