playlist

TED deep cuts vol. 1

We have 2,600+ TED Talks and counting. Sometimes, things get a little buried. Check out some great TED Talks that flew under the radar.

  1. 16:38
    Jennifer 8. Lee The hunt for General Tso

    Reporter Jennifer 8. Lee talks about her hunt for the origins of familiar Chinese-American dishes — exploring the hidden spots where these two cultures have (so tastily) combined to form a new cuisine.

  2. 14:48
    Mae Jemison Teach arts and sciences together

    Mae Jemison is an astronaut, a doctor, an art collector, a dancer ... Telling stories from her own education and from her time in space, she calls on educators to teach both the arts and sciences, both intuition and logic, as one — to create bold thinkers.

  3. 13:01
    Bruce McCall What is retro-futurism?

    Bruce McCall paints a retro-future that never happened — full of flying cars, polo-playing tanks and the RMS Tyrannic, "The Biggest Thing in All the World." At Serious Play '08, he narrates a brisk and funny slideshow of his faux-nostalgic art.

  4. 17:42
    Yoruba Richen What the gay rights movement learned from the civil rights movement

    As a member of both the African American and LGBT communities, filmmaker Yoruba Richen is fascinated with the overlaps and tensions between the gay rights and the civil rights movements. She explores how the two struggles intertwine and propel each other forward — and, in an unmissable argument, she dispels a myth about their points of conflict. A powerful reminder that we all have a stake in equality.

  5. 15:40
    Carolyn Steel How food shapes our cities

    Every day, in a city the size of London, 30 million meals are served. But where does all the food come from? Architect Carolyn Steel discusses the daily miracle of feeding a city, and shows how ancient food routes shaped the modern world.

  6. 17:18
    George Dyson The birth of the computer

    Historian George Dyson tells stories from the birth of the modern computer — from its 17th-century origins to the hilarious notebooks of some early computer engineers.

  7. 13:46
    Kristen Marhaver How we're growing baby corals to rebuild reefs

    Kristen Marhaver studies corals, tiny creatures the size of a poppyseed that, over hundreds of slow years, create beautiful, life-sustaining ocean structures hundreds of miles long. As she admits, it's easy to get sad about the state of coral reefs; they're in the news lately because of how quickly they're bleaching, dying and turning to slime. But the good news is that we're learning more and more about these amazing marine invertebrates — including how to help them (and help them help us). This biologist and TED Senior Fellow offers a glimpse into the wonderful and mysterious lives of these hard-working and fragile creatures.

  8. 15:34
    Peter Reinhart The art and craft of bread

    Batch to batch, crust to crust ... In tribute to the beloved staple food, baking master Peter Reinhart reflects on the cordial couplings (wheat and yeast, starch and heat) that give us our daily bread. Try not to eat a slice.

  9. 14:08
    Vinay Venkatraman Technology crafts for the digitally underserved

    Two-thirds of the world may not have access to the latest smartphone, but local electronic shops are adept at fixing older tech using low-cost parts. Vinay Venkatraman explains his work in "technology crafts," through which a mobile phone, a lunchbox and a flashlight can become a digital projector for a village school, or an alarm clock and a mouse can be melded into a medical device for local triage.

  10. 12:36
    Sherwin Nuland The extraordinary power of ordinary people

    Sherwin Nuland, a surgeon and a writer, meditates on the idea of hope — the desire to become our better selves and make a better world. It's a thoughtful 12 minutes that will help you focus on the road ahead.

  11. 4:09
    Lakshmi Pratury The lost art of letter-writing

    Lakshmi Pratury remembers the lost art of letter-writing and shares a series of notes her father wrote to her before he died. Her short but heartfelt talk may inspire you to set pen to paper, too.

  12. 12:29
    Robert Neuwirth The power of the informal economy

    Robert Neuwirth spent four years among the chaotic stalls of street markets, talking to pushcart hawkers and gray marketers, to study the remarkable "System D," the world's unlicensed economic network. Responsible for some 1.8 billion jobs, it's an economy of underappreciated power and scope.