playlist

What comes after war?

PTSD, isolation, depression ... These talks tackle the visible and invisible wounds left behind by violent conflict.

  1. 13:28
    Sebastian Junger Our lonely society makes it hard to come home from war

    Sebastian Junger has seen war up close, and he knows the impact that battlefield trauma has on soldiers. But he suggests there's another major cause of pain for veterans when they come home: the experience of leaving the tribal closeness of the military and returning to an alienating and bitterly divided modern society. "Sometimes, we ask ourselves if we can save the vets," Junger says. "I think the real question is if we can save ourselves."

  2. 14:21
    Margaret Bourdeaux Why civilians suffer more once a war is over

    In a war, it turns out that violence isn't the biggest killer of civilians. What is? Illness, hunger, poverty — because war destroys the institutions that keep society running, like utilities, banks, food systems and hospitals. Physician Margaret Bourdeaux proposes a bold approach to post-conflict recovery, setting priorities on what to fix first

  3. 14:27
    Wes Moore How to talk to veterans about war

    Wes Moore joined the US Army to pay for college, but the experience became core to who he is. In this heartfelt talk, the paratrooper and captain — who went on to write "The Other Wes Moore" — explains the shock of returning home from Afghanistan. He shares the single phrase he heard from civilians on repeat, and shows why it's just not sufficient. It's a call for all of us to ask veterans to tell their stories — and listen.

  4. 9:48
    Melissa Walker Art can heal PTSD's invisible wounds

    Trauma silences its victims, says creative arts therapist Melissa Walker, but art can help those suffering from the psychological wounds of war begin to open up and heal. In this inspiring talk, Walker describes how mask-making, in particular, allows afflicted servicemen and women reveal what haunts them — and, finally, start to let it go.

  5. 10:31
    Hector Garcia We train soldiers for war. Let's train them to come home, too

    Before soldiers are sent into combat, they're trained on how to function in an immensely dangerous environment. But they also need training on how to return from the battlefield to civilian life, says psychologist Hector Garcia. Applying the same principles used to prepare soldiers for war, Garcia is helping veterans suffering from PTSD get their lives back.