playlist

Poor design… and how to make it better

When form and function don’t exactly match up, these speakers offer masterful advice on how to keep good design in mind. (Sorry, Pocatello.)

  1. 18:18
    Roman Mars Why city flags may be the worst-designed thing you've never noticed

    Roman Mars is obsessed with flags — and after you watch this talk, you might be, too. These ubiquitous symbols of civic pride are often designed, well, pretty terribly. But they don't have to be. In this surprising and hilarious talk about vexillology — the study of flags — Mars reveals the five basic principles of flag design and shows why he believes they can be applied to just about anything.

  2. 13:17
    Elise Roy When we design for disability, we all benefit

    "I believe that losing my hearing was one of the greatest gifts I've ever received," says Elise Roy. As a disability rights lawyer and design thinker, she knows that being Deaf gives her a unique way of experiencing and reframing the world — a perspective that could solve some of our largest problems. As she says: "When we design for disability first, you often stumble upon solutions that are better than those when we design for the norm."

  3. 6:04
    Jacek Utko Can design save newspapers?

    Jacek Utko is an extraordinary Polish newspaper designer whose redesigns for papers in Eastern Europe not only win awards, but increase circulation by up to 100%. Can good design save the newspaper? It just might.

  4. 16:33
    Thomas Goetz It's time to redesign medical data

    Your medical chart: it's hard to access, impossible to read — and full of information that could make you healthier if you just knew how to use it. At TEDMED, Thomas Goetz looks at medical data, making a bold call to redesign it and get more insight from it.

  5. 16:41
    Tony Fadell The first secret of design is ... noticing

    As human beings, we get used to "the way things are" really fast. But for designers, the way things are is an opportunity ... Could things be better? How? In this funny, breezy talk, the man behind the iPod and the Nest thermostat shares some of his tips for noticing — and driving — change.