playlist

Philippe Starck: 11 truly thrilling talks

Designer Philippe Starck handpicked this list of talks about science and design — ideas that spur imagination and inspire creativity.

  1. 15:22
    Kevin Slavin How algorithms shape our world

    We live in a world run by algorithms, computer programs that make decisions or solve problems for us. In this riveting, funny talk, Kevin Slavin shows how modern algorithms determine stock prices, espionage tactics, even the movies you watch. But, he asks: If we depend on complex algorithms to manage our daily decisions — when do we start to lose control?

  2. 7:53
    Amber Case We are all cyborgs now

    Technology is evolving us, says Amber Case, as we become a screen-staring, button-clicking new version of homo sapiens. We now rely on "external brains" (cell phones and computers) to communicate, remember, even live out secondary lives. But will these machines ultimately connect or conquer us? Case offers surprising insight into our cyborg selves.

  3. 17:18
    Neil Gershenfeld Unleash your creativity in a Fab Lab

    MIT professor Neil Gershenfeld talks about his Fab Lab — a low-cost lab that lets people build things they need using digital and analog tools. It's a simple idea with powerful results.

  4. 3:59
    Lucy McRae How can technology transform the human body?

    TED Fellow Lucy McRae is a body architect — she imagines ways to merge biology and technology in our own bodies. In this visually stunning talk, she shows her work, from clothes that recreate the body's insides for a music video with pop-star Robyn, to a pill that, when swallowed, lets you sweat perfume.

  5. 9:35
    Neil Harbisson I listen to color

    Artist Neil Harbisson was born completely color blind, but these days a device attached to his head turns color into audible frequencies. Instead of seeing a world in grayscale, Harbisson can hear a symphony of color — and yes, even listen to faces and paintings.

  6. 15:11
    Lee Cronin Making matter come alive

    Before life existed on Earth, there was just matter, inorganic dead "stuff." How improbable is it that life arose? And — could it use a different type of chemistry? Using an elegant definition of life (anything that can evolve), chemist Lee Cronin is exploring this question by attempting to create a fully inorganic cell using a "Lego kit" of inorganic molecules — no carbon — that can assemble, replicate and compete.

  7. 18:50
    Juan Enriquez The next species of human

    While the mega-banks were toppling in early 2009, Juan Enriquez took the stage to say: The really big reboot is yet to come. But don't look for it on the stock exchange or the political ballot. It'll come from science labs, and it promises keener bodies and minds. Our kids are going to be ... different.

  8. 21:47
    Brian Greene Is our universe the only universe?

    Is there more than one universe? In this visually rich, action-packed talk, Brian Greene shows how the unanswered questions of physics (starting with a big one: What caused the Big Bang?) have led to the theory that our own universe is just one of many in the "multiverse."

  9. 14:58
    Susan Solomon The promise of research with stem cells

    Calling them "our bodies' own repair kits," Susan Solomon advocates research using lab-grown stem cells. By growing individual pluripotent stem cell lines, her team creates testbeds that could accelerate research into curing diseases — and perhaps lead to individualized treatment, targeted not just to a particular disease but a particular person.

  10. 14:49
    Lisa Harouni A primer on 3D printing

    2012 may be the year of 3D printing, when this three-decade-old technology finally becomes accessible and even commonplace. Lisa Harouni gives a useful introduction to this fascinating way of making things — including intricate objects once impossible to create.

  11. 11:07
    Michael Hansmeyer Building unimaginable shapes

    Inspired by cell division, Michael Hansmeyer writes algorithms that design outrageously fascinating shapes and forms with millions of facets. No person could draft them by hand, but they're buildable — and they could revolutionize the way we think of architectural form.