playlist

What are we really teaching AI?

A glimpse inside what we're teaching artificially intelligent machines and a cautionary tale of what could happen if we get it wrong.

  1. 19:45
    Jeremy Howard The wonderful and terrifying implications of computers that can learn

    What happens when we teach a computer how to learn? Technologist Jeremy Howard shares some surprising new developments in the fast-moving field of deep learning, a technique that can give computers the ability to learn Chinese, or to recognize objects in photos, or to help think through a medical diagnosis. (One deep learning tool, after watching hours of YouTube, taught itself the concept of “cats.”) Get caught up on a field that will change the way the computers around you behave … sooner than you probably think.

  2. 22:55
    Zeynep Tufekci We're building a dystopia just to make people click on ads

    We're building an artificial intelligence-powered dystopia, one click at a time, says techno-sociologist Zeynep Tufekci. In an eye-opening talk, she details how the same algorithms companies like Facebook, Google and Amazon use to get you to click on ads are also used to organize your access to political and social information. And the machines aren't even the real threat. What we need to understand is how the powerful might use AI to control us — and what we can do in response.

  3. 17:58
    Fei-Fei Li How we're teaching computers to understand pictures

    When a very young child looks at a picture, she can identify simple elements: "cat," "book," "chair." Now, computers are getting smart enough to do that too. What's next? In a thrilling talk, computer vision expert Fei-Fei Li describes the state of the art — including the database of 15 million photos her team built to "teach" a computer to understand pictures — and the key insights yet to come.

  4. 7:37
    Joseph Redmon How a computer learns to recognize objects instantly

    Ten years ago, researchers thought that getting a computer to tell the difference between a cat and a dog would be almost impossible. Today, computer vision systems do it with greater than 99 percent accuracy. How? Joseph Redmon works on the YOLO (You Only Look Once) system, an open-source method of object detection that can identify objects in images and video — from zebras to stop signs — with lightning-quick speed. In a remarkable live demo, Redmon shows off this important step forward for applications like self-driving cars, robotics and even cancer detection.

  5. 17:34
    Blaise Agüera y Arcas How computers are learning to be creative

    We're on the edge of a new frontier in art and creativity — and it's not human. Blaise Agüera y Arcas, principal scientist at Google, works with deep neural networks for machine perception and distributed learning. In this captivating demo, he shows how neural nets trained to recognize images can be run in reverse, to generate them. The results: spectacular, hallucinatory collages (and poems!) that defy categorization. "Perception and creativity are very intimately connected," Agüera y Arcas says. "Any creature, any being that is able to do perceptual acts is also able to create."

  6. 10:51
    Radhika Nagpal What intelligent machines can learn from a school of fish

    Science fiction visions of the future show us AI built to replicate our way of thinking — but what if we modeled it instead on the other kinds of intelligence found in nature? Robotics engineer Radhika Nagpal studies the collective intelligence displayed by insects and fish schools, seeking to understand their rules of engagement. In a visionary talk, she presents her work creating artificial collective power and previews a future where swarms of robots work together to build flood barriers, pollinate crops, monitor coral reefs and form constellations of satellites.

  7. 10:56
    Oscar Schwartz Can a computer write poetry?

    If you read a poem and feel moved by it, but then find out it was actually written by a computer, would you feel differently about the experience? Would you think that the computer had expressed itself and been creative, or would you feel like you had fallen for a cheap trick? In this talk, writer Oscar Schwartz examines why we react so strongly to the idea of a computer writing poetry — and how this reaction helps us understand what it means to be human. — Poetry test #1 Poem 1 Little Fly Thy summer’s play, My thoughtless hand Has bush’d away. Am not I A fly like thee? Or art not thou A man like me? Poem 2 We can feel Activist through your life’s Morning Pauses to see, pope I hate the Non all the night to start a great otherwise I’ll snake swirling Vastness guess Totally mental hamsters if I Know I put on a year a crucial Absolutely. Poetry test #2 Poem 1 A lion roars and a dog barks. It is interesting and fascinating that a bird will fly and not roar or bark. Enthralling stories about animals are in my dreams and I will sing them all if I am not exhausted and weary. Poem 2 Oh! kangaroos, sequins, chocolate sodas! You really are beautiful! Pearls, harmonicas, jujubes, aspirins! All the stuff they’ve always talked about still makes a poem a surprise! These things are with us every day even on beachheads and biers. They do have meaning. They’re strong as rocks. Poetry test #3 Poem 1 Red flags the reason for pretty flags. And ribbons. Ribbons of flags And wearing material Reason for wearing material. Give pleasure. Can you give me the regions. The regions and the land. The regions and wheels. All wheels are perfect. Enthusiasm. Poem 2 A wounded deer leaps highest, I’ve heard the daffodil I’ve heard the flag to-day I’ve heard the hunter tell; ‘Tis but the ecstasy of death, And then the brake is almost done, And sunrise grows so near sunrise grows so near That we can touch the despair and frenzied hope of all the ages.

  8. 9:46
    Tom Gruber How AI can enhance our memory, work and social lives

    How smart can our machines make us? Tom Gruber, co-creator of Siri, wants to make "humanistic AI" that augments and collaborates with us instead of competing with (or replacing) us. He shares his vision for a future where AI helps us achieve superhuman performance in perception, creativity and cognitive function — from turbocharging our design skills to helping us remember everything we've ever read and the name of everyone we've ever met. "We are in the middle of a renaissance in AI," Gruber says. "Every time a machine gets smarter, we get smarter."

  9. 16:31
    Nick Bostrom What happens when our computers get smarter than we are?

    Artificial intelligence is getting smarter by leaps and bounds — within this century, research suggests, a computer AI could be as "smart" as a human being. And then, says Nick Bostrom, it will overtake us: "Machine intelligence is the last invention that humanity will ever need to make." A philosopher and technologist, Bostrom asks us to think hard about the world we're building right now, driven by thinking machines. Will our smart machines help to preserve humanity and our values — or will they have values of their own?

  10. 14:27
    Sam Harris Can we build AI without losing control over it?

    Scared of superintelligent AI? You should be, says neuroscientist and philosopher Sam Harris — and not just in some theoretical way. We're going to build superhuman machines, says Harris, but we haven't yet grappled with the problems associated with creating something that may treat us the way we treat ants.