playlist

The future of surgery

Exciting innovations and advancements that demonstrate how going under the knife is becoming a safer, clearer and more efficient process for all.

  1. 18:55
    Catherine Mohr Surgery's past, present and robotic future

    Surgeon and inventor Catherine Mohr tours the history of surgery (and its pre-painkiller, pre-antiseptic past), then demos some of the newest tools for surgery through tiny incisions, performed using nimble robot hands. Fascinating — but not for the squeamish.

  2. 16:08
    Quyen Nguyen Color-coded surgery

    Surgeons are taught from textbooks which conveniently color-code the types of tissues, but that's not what it looks like in real life — until now. At TEDMED Quyen Nguyen demonstrates how a molecular marker can make tumors light up in neon green, showing surgeons exactly where to cut.

  3. 16:13
    Yoav Medan Ultrasound surgery — healing without cuts

    Imagine having a surgery with no knives involved. At TEDMED, Yoav Medan shares a technique that uses MRI to find trouble spots and focused ultrasound to treat such issues as brain lesions, uterine fibroids and several kinds of cancerous growths.

  4. 12:42
    Adam de la Zerda We can start winning the war against cancer

    Learn about the latest advances in the war against cancer from Stanford researcher Adam de la Zerda, who's working on some cutting-edge techniques of his own. Using a remarkable imaging technology that illuminates cancer-seeking gold particles injected into the body, de la Zerda's lab hopes to light the way for surgeons to remove even the tiniest trace of deadly tumors.

  5. 9:28
    Franz Freudenthal A new way to heal hearts without surgery

    At the intersection of medical invention and indigenous culture, pediatric cardiologist Franz Freudenthal mends holes in the hearts of children across the world, using a device born from traditional Bolivian loom weaving. "The most complex problems in our time," he says, "can be solved with simple techniques, if we are able to dream."

  6. 6:36
    Jack Choi On the virtual dissection table

    Onstage at TED2012, Jack Choi demonstrates a powerful tool for training medical students: a stretcher-sized multi-touch screen of the human body that lets you explore, dissect and understand the body's parts and systems.

  7. 11:41
    Steven Schwaitzberg A universal translator for surgeons

    Laparoscopic surgery uses minimally invasive incisions — which means less pain and shorter recovery times for patients. But Steven Schwaitzberg has run into two problems teaching these techniques to surgeons around the world: language and distance. He shares how a new technology, which combines videoconferencing and a real-time universal translator, could help.