playlist

The power of collaboration

Great things happen when we work together. Whether on the web or in the face of disaster, these talks reveal the undeniable strength of teaming up.

  1. 17:17
    Linda Hill How to manage for collective creativity

    What's the secret to unlocking the creativity hidden inside your daily work, and giving every great idea a chance? Harvard professor Linda Hill, co-author of "Collective Genius," has studied some of the world's most creative companies to come up with a set of tools and tactics to keep great ideas flowing — from everyone in the company, not just the designated "creatives."

  2. 14:14
    Arthur Brooks A conservative's plea: Let's work together

    Conservatives and liberals both believe that they alone are motivated by love while their opponents are motivated by hate. How can we solve problems with so much polarization? In this talk, social scientist Arthur Brooks shares ideas for what we can each do as individuals to break the gridlock. "We might just be able to take the ghastly holy war of ideology that we're suffering under and turn it into a competition of ideas," he says.

  3. 9:37
    Pardis Sabeti How we'll fight the next deadly virus

    When Ebola broke out in March 2014, Pardis Sabeti and her team got to work sequencing the virus's genome, learning how it mutated and spread. Sabeti immediately released her research online, so virus trackers and scientists from around the world could join in the urgent fight. In this talk, she shows how open cooperation was key to halting the virus ... and to attacking the next one to come along. "We had to work openly, we had to share and we had to work together," Sabeti says. "Let us not let the world be defined by the destruction wrought by one virus, but illuminated by billions of hearts and minds working in unity."

  4. 16:39
    Luis von Ahn Massive-scale online collaboration

    After re-purposing CAPTCHA so each human-typed response helps digitize books, Luis von Ahn wondered how else to use small contributions by many on the Internet for greater good. At TEDxCMU, he shares how his ambitious new project, Duolingo, will help millions learn a new language while translating the web quickly and accurately — all for free.

  5. 9:23
    Caitria + Morgan O'Neill How to step up in the face of disaster

    After a natural disaster strikes, there’s only a tiny window of opportunity to rally effective recovery efforts before the world turns their attention elsewhere. Who should be in charge? When a freak tornado hit their hometown, sisters Caitria and Morgan O’Neill — just 20 and 24 at the time — took the reins and are now teaching others how to do the same. (Filmed at TEDxBoston.)

  6. 16:34
    Rachel Botsman The case for collaborative consumption

    At TEDxSydney, Rachel Botsman says we're "wired to share" — and shows how websites like Zipcar and Swaptree are changing the rules of human behavior.

  7. 15:46
    Massimo Banzi How Arduino is open-sourcing imagination

    Massimo Banzi helped invent the Arduino, a tiny, easy-to-use open-source microcontroller that's inspired thousands of people around the world to make the coolest things they can imagine — from toys to satellite gear. Because, as he says, "You don't need anyone's permission to make something great."

  8. 10:52
    Salvatore Iaconesi What happened when I open-sourced my brain cancer

    When artist Salvatore Iaconesi was diagnosed with brain cancer, he refused to be a passive patient — which, he points out, means "one who waits." So he hacked his brain scans, posted them online, and invited a global community to pitch in on a "cure." This sometimes meant medical advice, and it sometimes meant art, music, emotional support — from more than half a million people.