playlist

The rise of Africa’s next generation

What’s the biggest influence on Africa’s future? Its youth. Join the conversation with Africa’s present leaders who seek to inspire and empower the generations of leaders to come.

  1. 14:22
    Siyanda Mohutsiwa How young Africans found a voice on Twitter

    What can a young woman with an idea, an Internet connection and a bit of creativity achieve? That's all Siyanda Mohutsiwa needed to unite young African voices in a new way. Hear how Mohutsiwa and other young people across the continent are using social media to overcome borders and circumstance, accessing something they have long had to violently take: a voice.

  2. 13:26
    Fred Swaniker The leaders who ruined Africa, and the generation who can fix it

    Before he hit eighteen, Fred Swaniker had lived in Ghana, Gambia, Botswana and Zimbabwe. What he learned from a childhood across Africa was that while good leaders can't make much of a difference in societies with strong institutions, in countries with weak structures, leaders could make or break a country. In a passionate talk the entrepreneur and TED Fellow looks at different generations of African leaders and imagines how to develop the leadership of the future.

  3. 20:13
    Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala Want to help Africa? Do business here

    We know the negative images of Africa — famine and disease, conflict and corruption. But, says Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, there's another, less-told story happening in many African nations: one of reform, economic growth and business opportunity.

  4. 17:50
    George Ayittey Africa's cheetahs versus hippos

    Ghanaian economist George Ayittey unleashes a torrent of controlled anger toward corrupt leaders in Africa — and calls on the "Cheetah generation" to take back the continent.

  5. 17:31
    Patrick Awuah How to educate leaders? Liberal arts

    A liberal arts education is critical to forming true leaders, says university head Patrick Awuah — because it builds decision-making skills, an ethical framework and a broad vision. Awuah himself left a career at Microsoft in the US to found a liberal arts school in Africa: Ashesi University, in his home nation of Ghana. A passionate talk about dreaming, doing and leading.