playlist

Open-source, open world

Embrace our wide-open shareable future — where everything's hackable and the power of the crowd propels innovation.

  1. 15:46
    Massimo Banzi How Arduino is open-sourcing imagination

    Massimo Banzi helped invent the Arduino, a tiny, easy-to-use open-source microcontroller that's inspired thousands of people around the world to make the coolest things they can imagine — from toys to satellite gear. Because, as he says, "You don't need anyone's permission to make something great."

  2. 21:30
    Linus Torvalds The mind behind Linux

    Linus Torvalds transformed technology twice — first with the Linux kernel, which helps power the Internet, and again with Git, the source code management system used by developers worldwide. In a rare interview with TED Curator Chris Anderson, Torvalds discusses with remarkable openness the personality traits that prompted his unique philosophy of work, engineering and life. "I am not a visionary, I'm an engineer," Torvalds says. "I'm perfectly happy with all the people who are walking around and just staring at the clouds ... but I'm looking at the ground, and I want to fix the pothole that's right in front of me before I fall in."

  3. 5:33
    Tim Berners-Lee The year open data went worldwide

    At TED2009, Tim Berners-Lee called for "raw data now" — for governments, scientists and institutions to make their data openly available on the web. At TED University in 2010, he shows a few of the interesting results when the data gets linked up.

  4. 16:39
    Luis von Ahn Massive-scale online collaboration

    After re-purposing CAPTCHA so each human-typed response helps digitize books, Luis von Ahn wondered how else to use small contributions by many on the Internet for greater good. In this talk, he shares how his ambitious new project, Duolingo, will help millions learn a new language while translating the web quickly and accurately — all for free.

  5. 13:47
    Amanda Palmer The art of asking

    Don't make people pay for music, says Amanda Palmer: Let them. In a passionate talk that begins in her days as a street performer (drop a dollar in the hat for the Eight-Foot Bride!), she examines the new relationship between artist and fan.

  6. 13:07
    Clay Shirky How cognitive surplus will change the world

    Clay Shirky looks at "cognitive surplus" — the shared, online work we do with our spare brain cycles. While we're busy editing Wikipedia, posting to Ushahidi (and yes, making LOLcats), we're building a better, more cooperative world.

  7. 20:01
    Jimmy Wales The birth of Wikipedia

    Jimmy Wales recalls how he assembled "a ragtag band of volunteers," gave them tools for collaborating and created Wikipedia, the self-organizing, self-correcting, never-finished online encyclopedia.

  8. 12:11
    Jennifer Pahlka Coding a better government

    Can government be run like the Internet, permissionless and open? Coder and activist Jennifer Pahlka believes it can — and that apps, built quickly and cheaply, are a powerful new way to connect citizens to their governments — and their neighbors.

  9. 19:01
    Charles Leadbeater The era of open innovation

    In this deceptively casual talk, Charles Leadbeater weaves a tight argument that innovation isn't just for professionals anymore. Passionate amateurs, using new tools, are creating products and paradigms that companies can't.

  10. 19:46
    Rachel Botsman The currency of the new economy is trust

    There's been an explosion of collaborative consumption — web-powered sharing of cars, apartments, skills. Rachel Botsman explores the currency that makes systems like Airbnb and Taskrabbit work: trust, influence, and what she calls "reputation capital."