TEDx » Organize An Event » The rules » All rules

This page contains the complete set of rules for organizing a TEDx event from start to finish -- from creating your event's unique TEDx logo to creating a website to acquiring sponsorships that cover your event's operating costs. Each item on this page is a rule -- non-negotiable and mandatory for all TEDx event organizers.

Note: You may not begin organizing an event until after your application for a license has been approved by TED.



General rules

  • Spirit/purpose: Your event must maintain the spirit of TED itself: multidisciplinary, focused on the power of ideas to change attitudes, lives and ultimately, the world.
  • Focus/theme: TEDx event themes should be multidisciplinary and broad. TEDx events must feature a diversity of speakers from across several disciplines that address a variety of topics. These topics should not fall under a single subject.
  • Format: A suite of short, carefully prepared talks, demonstrations and performances on a wide range of subjects to foster learning, inspiration and wonder -- and to provoke conversations that matter. (The typical presentation should be an 18-minute talk by a single presenter. No talk should exceed 18 minutes. No panels. No break-out sessions. Usually: No podium.) You may not pay your speakers to present.
  • Length: Your event may not exceed one day in length.
  • Frequency: A TEDx license permits you to organize one event. (If you want to organize a recurring event, you must apply for a new, second license after you've organized one TEDx event.)
  • Location: TED allocates one location-based license per applicant; you must live in the city for which you are applying for a license. Your TEDx event must happen in the city for which you received the license. TEDx events do not travel -- a TEDx license is valid for one city, and for one event.
  • Admission/tickets: You may not use your event to make money. You may not use your event to raise funds for charities or other organizations. (TED will allow certain TEDx events to charge a small admission fee -- always under $100 -- to help cover the event's production costs. In order to charge an admission fee, you must first submit your proposed ticket price for approval from TED.)
  • Attendance: Up to 100 individuals may attend your event. (Only individuals who have attended an official TED conference in person may organize an event with more than 100 attendees. I.e., the primary license holder -- the individual whose name is on the application form -- must have attended a TED conference. Having attended a TEDx event does not qualify you to host an event for more than 100 guests.)
  • Introduction video: A short, official video introduction must be played at the beginning of your event. (Playing this video is not optional; the purpose of the video is to make sure that your audience understands what TEDx is, and the difference between it and TED.)
  • Pre-recorded talks: A minimum of two official, pre-recorded TED Talks must be shown at events which are less than half a day in length. For longer events, 25% of the total number of talks must be official, pre-recorded TED Talks. Talks from the TEDxTalks site do not apply.
  • Live original content: You must record all original stage content (live talks, performances, etc.) on video. After your event, you must make this video accessible to TED and the public.
  • Speakers: Organizers cannot be speakers at their own event.
  • Speaker waiver: All of your speakers, performers and other stage presenters must sign this permission release form, giving TED and others the right to edit and distribute video of their presentation.
  • Branding: Never use the TED logo. Do not use the generic TEDx logo; you must use your own event's official, unique TEDx brand identity (see the "Branding / identity / logo") in all communications. You must make it clear that your event is independently organized.
  • License term: Your TEDx license is valid for one year from its date of approval, or until the conclusion of your event -- whichever comes first. You must re-apply for each subsequent event.
  • License transfers: TEDx licenses are non-transferable -- you cannot transfer your TEDx license to another individual. (If you want to relinquish your license to allow another organizer to have it, you'll need to notify us first. The new licensee will need to fill out his or her own application.)
  • Co-branding: We do not allow co-branding (i.e., connecting the TEDx logo/identity/name to the name of another organization), except in certain circumstances; pre-approval is always required:
    • Corporations/organizations: Co-branding your event with a company, organization or agency is only permitted in the case of an internal event. (To be considered an internal event, your event must be for employees only, promoted only within the organization -- not to clients, the public, etc. Video and other material from your event may only be shared inside the organization.)
    • Schools/NGOs/camps: We do not co-brand with NGOs. We only co-brand with schools and universities.
    • Clubs: In the case of schools, colleges and universities, it is possible to create a club to assist with the organization and structure of your TEDx event.
      • Schools: TEDx events that take place at a school may create a TEDx event club at their school in order to execute their TEDx event. The activities of this club can include: team building, regular TEDtalk viewing events and organizing and structural planning of a TEDx event. The name of the club should mirror the name of the TEDx event with a space and then the qualifier "Club". Eg. A school club for TEDxIBYork would be TEDxIBYork Club. Note: A teacher advisor must be part of this TEDx event club, as well as a student TEDx event club leader.
      • Universities: University organizers can create a TEDx event club at their school in order to execute their TEDx event The activities of this club can include: team building, regular TEDTalk viewing events and organizing and structural planning of a TEDx event. The name of the club should mirror the name of the TEDx event with a space and then the qualifier "Club". Eg. A university club for TEDxYale would be TEDxYale Club. Note: A teacher advisor must be part of this TEDx event club, as well as a student TEDx event club leader who would ideally be the primary licensee of this event.
  • Co-events: TEDx events are stand-alone events -- they may not be combined with or integrated into any pre-existing conference or event.
  • Recurring events under one license: Organizers who want to produce weekly TEDx events may apply for a license for a recurring event. (We only consider weekly events to be "recurring"; monthly events must apply for a new license at the end of each cycle.) To apply for a recurring event, you must first have organized at least one TEDx event. If you would like to request a license for a recurring event, contact us.
  • Closing out your event: After your event, you'll need to do the following:
    1. Fill out the organizer survey (required)
    2. Send the audience survey to your attendees (required)
    3. Upload photos to Flickr, tagged "TEDx" + "TEDx[place name]" (required)
    4. Upload video (if any) to the TEDx channel on YouTube (follow our guidelines) (required)
    5. Tell us your story (optional)
    6. Re-apply to renew your license (optional)
    7. Share with the community (optional)
    8. Subtitle your videos to reach a wider audience! TEDx talks can be transcribed and translated through TED's Open Translation Project. Follow these five steps to get started. (optional)

    * Read the complete guide to closing out your event.


Naming a TEDx event

All TEDx event names follow the same convention: a name beginning with TEDx, followed by a location-based descriptor such as the name of your city, school, or neighborhood. (E.g., TEDxSydney, TEDxThames, TEDxUSC.) TED must approve your event's name; we approve when you submit the standard application form.

TEDx events are community-driven and must be named after the local area in which the community it will serve is situated. If the name of your city or town is taken - or if your city is very large - consider a neighborhood, street, river, lake or public square name. The TEDx name you nominate must be local and specific to your area within your town or city.

TEDx names are discretionary, and take into consideration the overall TEDx strategy. You are not guaranteed to receive the TEDx name for which you apply, even if it is listed as "Available."

  • Country names: No country names will be granted, with the exception of small islands. No state names or province names will be granted.
  • Major city names: Place names corresponding to major cities will be reserved for individuals organizing events attended by more than 100 people. (To organize an event attended by more than 100 people, you need to have attended a TED conference in person.)
  • Building names: No building or museum names will be granted.
  • Co-branded names: Names co-branded with organizations, non-profits and NGOs are not allowed. We don't co-brand with other conferences or seminars. We only co-brand with schools and universities, eg TEDxUSC.
  • Corporate names: When approved, corporations can only organize private, internal TEDx events (e.g., an event named TEDxPWCDublin may only be attended by PWC employees).
  • Theme names: We will not approve theme-based names (e.g., "TEDxMarketing" or "TEDxEducation"). We will not approve any location-based name with a theme or vertical added to it (e.g., "TEDxSydneyDesign" or "TEDxNewYorkSpace"). You may give your event program a theme ("Revolutionary Ideas"), but the name of your TEDx event (appearing on your logo, website, etc.) must be the standard location-based name.
  • Name abbreviation / variation: Name abbreviations and variations are not allowed. You must always refer to your event with the name you were approved for. (E.g., if you are licensed for "TEDxPhoenix," you may not refer to your event as "TEDxPHX" or any other variation. You must refer to it as "TEDxPhoenix" in all copy, messaging, logos, etc.)
  • Place names of 2 or more words: Some place names are composed of two or more words, e.g. San Francisco. However, TEDx names must never include spaces. Do not use spaces when referring to your event in your copy or on your logo. (The capitalization of subsequent words implies the space.) E.g., the name of an event for the city of San Francisco would be called "TEDxSanFrancisco."

TEDx no longer licenses location nicknames or large city/regional names. In addition, if you are choosing a street name, river, lake or other such entity, your event name must have a location qualifier where appropriate, such as TEDxRegentSt, TEDxBrickLane, TEDxRawaRiver.

Even if your city name is taken, you can name your event after a street or neighborhood, for example, in London there are more than ten local TEDx events, including TEDxLondon, TEDxRegentSt, TEDxEaling, TEDxEastEnd, TEDxSquareMile, TEDxTeddington, TEDxKensington, TEDxBow, TEDxEuston and TEDxMarylebone.


Branding / identity / logo

This section covers proper use of the TEDx brand identity, your event's specific TEDx logo, and complete specifications for print and on-screen applications. In order to maintain and preserve it, the only acceptable versions of the identity are those appearing in these rules.

The most important rule: Never use the TED logo. Only your event's approved TEDx logo that includes the TEDx tagline may be used. When you use your TEDx event's logo it must be accompanied by the tagline "x=independently organized TED event". This is a lockup -- your logo (as well as the generic TEDx logo) may not be used without this tagline.

When to use your TEDx identity: Your event's TEDx logo must appear on your website, on all outbound communications with speakers, attendees and sponsors, and on all PR and marketing materials.



One- or two-line tagline

The TEDx logo is unique artwork that has been created to brand and market all TEDx events. TEDx has an official tagline that is in a lockup relationship with TEDx: "x = independently organized TED event" must be included in the logo, either as one line or two lines. (Do not change the wording of the tagline -- the only approved versions are shown here.)

The one-line tagline logo is preferable. However in situations where there is not enough room to use a logo of this width, the two-line tagline logo may be used.





Logos and place names

Your specific TEDx logo will contain the place name. For longer place names, there is an alternative template that puts the place name on a second line.




Place names with descenders

For place names that contain lower-case letters with descenders (p, q, g, j, y) use the two-line stacked tagline so that the descenders do not touch the tagline.




TED color

  • Offset printing with Pantone inks: When possible, a spot color should be used for your logo -- this is the best way to reproduce TED red (Pantone 485).
  • Offset printing with 4-color process inks: If specifying a spot color is not possible, the 4-color process (CMYK) method of printing may be used to print your TEDx event's logo. 4-color process printing is acceptable, although it is not the preferable way to reproduce our logo. In 4-color process printing the TED red color will only be simulated.
    • Note that even though you may be offset printing a publication using 4-color process, it is often possible (and highly recommended) to specify an additional spot color (Pantone 485) for the logo.
  • Desktop printing: Sometimes it is more appropriate to produce branded publications and other communications using a digital process -- such as printing from a computer directly to a desktop laser or ink-jet printer. Local settings and calibrations should be used to determine the best color specifications for your particular printer.
  • On-screen/web: When your TEDx event's logo is reproduced on-screen in Microsoft PowerPoint presentations, in video, or online for the web, RGB or web color logos should be used. On-screen applications use RGB (red/green/blue) values to simulate color. On the web, hex values are used to specify color. Each of these specifications is shown above-right.


The colors shown here and throughout these guidelines have not been evaluated by Pantone Inc. for accuracy and may not match the Pantone Color Standards.

Due to the manner in which color is represented on-screen, the colors shown here may not accurately represent the true TEDx colors. Therefore, do not use the colors shown here (or a printed version of this page) for color matching. Instead, always refer to the color specifications and visually match the specified colors accurately using Pantone Color Standards.


Specifications / templates

We've created a unified system for TEDx logos, so they all retain the same look and feel. We provide two different templates that you can download and customize for your event. Each includes a text field for you to type in your event name (in Helvetica) so it automatically appears in the correct place. (For events with longer names, there is a template that puts the name of your event on a second line.)

  • Typeface: The typeface (Helvetica) is an integral part of our visual identity and should not be changed or substituted. Helvetica comes pre-installed on most computers, but if you do not have access to it, use Arial. If you have a different version of Helvetica (Helvetica Neue, for example) use the Regular weight of your version.
  • Kerning: Letter-spacing in the TEDx logo templates is set to 0. Do not adjust this setting.
  • Alignment: The name of your event should always align left in relation to the "TEDx" part of the logo, and should be sized to be exactly the same height as the "TEDx" part of the logo. Letter-spacing in the TEDx logo templates is set to 0. Do not adjust this setting.
  • Color: your TEDx event's logo should always include a red "TEDx", and either black or white text for the other words. Use a solid, all-white or all-black background. (For your event's profile on TED.com, we recommend a white background.) Do not place your TEDx event's logo on other colors or on photographic, patterned or illustrative backgrounds.


Background color

Use a solid, all-white or all-black background, as shown at right. (For your event's profile on TED.com, we recommend a white background.) Do not place your TEDx event's logo on other colors or on photographic, patterned or illustrative backgrounds.



Clear space

To remain completely legible and ensure that your TEDx event's logo is presented in the best possible manner, a minimum buffer zone of clear space should always be maintained around the entire perimeter of your logo. Other logos, graphics or copy must be kept out of this zone. (Logos may not be "locked up" with any other logos or images. Other logos cannot appear as if they are a part of your TEDx event's logo.)




Minimum size

Proportions must stay consistent when your logo is resized. To ensure legibility, never use your TEDx event's logo with an overall width that is less than 2.0 inches. At widths that are smaller than 2.0 inches, the tagline will become illegible.



What to avoid

Do not set the place name in all caps, or change its size.



Do not change the color of "TEDx," the place name, or the "x" in the tagline.



Only use the 2-line template for longer place names. Do not change the color of the "x" in TEDx.



Do not create your TEDx event's logo or tagline in your own typeface.



Copy / messaging

To support your TEDx event's graphic identity, several important verbal messages must appear on all your TEDx communications, especially outbound materials used for PR and marketing, to describe the program as a whole, and distinguish it from your specific event.

  • Mandatory language: All communications must include the following copy:
    This independent TEDx event is operated under license from TED.
    • On materials with multiple pages, each page must include the following copy:
      This TEDx event is independently organized.
  • Spacing: There is no space between "TEDx" and your event name's place name. E.g., when referring to your TEDx event with the place name in copy, use "TEDx[place name]".
  • Capitalization: Never capitalize the place name of your event name (e.g., "TEDxDUBLIN" is incorrect; it should be "TEDxDublin"). This goes for your logo, your website, and any other place where your event's name appears.
  • Describing the TEDx program: When describing the TEDx program to press, bloggers, attendees and friends, use the following copy (and be sure to distinguish between the program as a whole and your specific event, never referring to your event as "TEDx", but always as "TEDx[place name]"):
    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TED has created a program called TEDx.

    TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. Our event is call TEDx (name), where x=independently organized TED event. At our TEDx (name) event, TEDTalks video and live speakers will combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group.

    The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events, including ours, are self-organized.
  • Explaining the TEDx program's mission: Use the following copy to describe the TEDx program's mission:
    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED- like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x=independently organized TED event.

    The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.
  • Unacceptable copy: The TEDx program's brand name is written "TEDx" Do not use the following or any other variation:
    • TED-x
    • TEDX
    • TedX
  • Name abbreviation / variation: Name abbreviations and variations are not allowed. You must always refer to your event with the name you were approved for. (E.g., if you are licensed for "TEDxPhoenix," you may not refer to your event as "TEDxPHX" or any other variation. You must refer to it as "TEDxPhoenix" in all copy, messaging, logos, etc.)
  • Place names of 2 or more words: Some place names are composed of two or more words, e.g. San Francisco. However, TEDx names must never include spaces. Do not use spaces when referring to your event in your copy or on your logo. (The capitalization of subsequent words implies the space.) E.g., the name of an event for the city of San Francisco would be called "TEDxSanFrancisco."

Websites

Your TEDx website may only be used for the purposes of promoting your TEDx event. Your website should offer basic information about your event (its date and location; background on its organizers; the speaker roster and session schedule) and information about the TEDx program and TED.

  • Domain acquisition: Do not purchase a domain name until your license has been approved. You aren't required to purchase a domain name, but we strongly encourage it. (A domain name will make your site more findable.) Whether you decide to buy web hosting from a paid service or opt for a free hosting account is up to you. However, we do not permit any TEDx site to run advertising, so be sure that your hosting service does not require you to do so.
  • Your site's URL: The URL of your website's homepage should be the name of your TEDx event, e.g. TEDxTokyo.com. The .com top-level domain should be your first choice, followed by the top-level domain of your country (e.g., .pl for Poland). .org and .net should be your next choices.
  • Ownership of your domain name: When you purchase your TEDx[place name] domain name, you are entitled to keep the domain name as long as you are the TEDx licensee whose event's name corresponds exactly to the domain name in question. (E.g., as long as you are the licensee in charge of TEDxAcme, you may keep the domain name "http://www.tedxacme.com.")
  • Domain name squatting: You may only own the domain name that corresponds to your own event; you may not register domain names corresponding to other TEDx events -- including prospective events that have not yet been licensed -- without permission from TED. (In other words, you may not "squat" in domain names for potential TEDx events if you are not already the licensee, even if you intend to transfer ownership, or intend to apply for a license for the event at a later point.)
  • License renewal/relinquishment: If you decide not to renew your TEDx license after your TEDx event, or TED does not renew your license, you must transfer ownership of your TEDx domain name either back to your domain registrar (or web hosting service), or to another TEDx licensee. TED cannot be held liable for expenses incurred during the purchase, transfer or re-sale of TEDx-related domain names.
  • Content: Your site needs to include information about your live speakers, a description of your venue, the date and location of your event, and information about TEDx and TED.
    • Unacceptable content: You may not display any content associated with:
      • Weapons manufacturers
      • Ammunition companies
      • Cigarette companies
      • Online gambling organizations
      • Sex-related businesses
      • Other conferences or seminars
  • Homepage: Your site's homepage must include the following:
    • A visible link, on your event's homepage, to the TEDx program (http://www.ted.com/tedx)
    • Language that describes TEDx:
      What is TEDx?
      In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TED has created a program called TEDx. TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. Our event is called TEDx[name], where x = independently organized TED event. At our TEDx[name] event, TEDTalks video and live speakers will combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events, including ours, are self-organized.
    • Text in the footer that states "This independent TEDx event is operated under license from TED."
  • About page: Your site must have an "About" page that includes the following language:


  • Images: Never use the TED logo or TED conference images on your website or any other promotional materials. You may only use your TEDx event's logo and TEDx images.
  • Sponsors: Sponsor or partner logos or names may not appear on your site's homepage. Instead, create a separate page dedicated to your sponsors, and link to the page from your site's global navigation bar. Anywhere it appears, the sponsor's logo must be smaller than your TEDx event's logo.

Speakers

  • Selection: TEDx Organizers are responsible for procuring and handling their own speakers. TED staff do not help identify or secure speakers. TEDx organizers cannot speak at their own TEDx events.
  • Payment: TEDx events may never pay speakers.
  • Sponsorship: Speakers may not sponsor any portion of your TEDx event, in-kind or otherwise. Sponsors of your event cannot be speakers.
  • Duration: No talk can exceed 18 minutes in length.
  • Multi-topical and Multidisciplinary: TEDx events must feature a diversity of speakers from across several disciplines that address a variety of topics. These topics should not fall under a single subject.
  • Programming: Up to 75% of your program can consist of original speakers. 25 percent of your program should feature TEDTalks that have been featured on TED.com
  • Presentations: Every talk's content must be in compliance with copyright law. Speakers must inform you beforehand of any third-party material that will be used in their presentations and seek written permissions to copyrighted materials when applicable. TED cannot assist with this process or act as a consultant on individual cases.
  • Speaker release: Everyone who appears onstage must sign the TEDx Speaker Release form.
  • TEDxTalks videos: TEDx event teams must upload videos of every talk from their event to the TEDxTalks YouTube channel (and only the TEDxTalks YouTube channel) unless the content is in violation of the above rules. If an organizer chooses to withhold a talk, they are fully responsible for informing TEDx staff and then for communicating the reasoning of their actions to the speakers.
  • Content: Talks may cover a wide variety of topics and presenting styles. Speakers should be encouraged to prepare carefully to ensure they can express their idea effectively in the available short time slot. There only a few key restrictions in terms of style or content:

    No commercial agenda. Speakers should not promote their own products, books, or businesses or those of a company which employs them. The only exception is where they have specifically been invited to give a powerful product demo, or to describe the ideas in their book, and here the focus should still be on the technology and/or the ideas.

    Avoid pseudoscience. TED and TEDx are platforms for showcasing and explaining genuine advances in science, and it's important we retain the respect of the scientific community. Speakers should avoid the misuse of scientific language to make unsubstantiated claims.

    TEDx is also not the right platform for talks with an inflammatory political or religious agenda, nor for polarizing “us vs them” language. We seek to build consensus and provide outside-the-box thinking, not to revisit familiar, unresolvable disputes on these topics.

    If talks violate the guidelines above, we reserve the right to insist on their removal from TEDx branded distribution outlets, and license renewal is unlikely.

    For a more detailed description of our content guidelines, along with some tips on how to identify suspect science, read the TEDx content guidelines »

Photo + video

Rights
  • Before covering an event, photographers must sign this release form stating that they will release the photos under the Creative Commons "Attribution - Noncommercial - NonDerivative" license and authorize TED Conferences, LLC to replicate and distribute their photos for publicity releases, program marketing, and on print and web TED properties.
  • Photos of TEDx events must be released under a Creative Commons license ("Attribution - NonCommercial - NonDerivative"), so they can be freely shared and reposted
Credits
  • When posting photographs anywhere (e.g. on Flickr), clearly credit the photographer in metadata, captions and tags
  • If you use an image from another TEDx event, contact the event's organizer to confirm that use of the image is authorized
Video

Sponsor logos on your videos: Sponsor logos may only be shown on one slide at the beginning and end of each video. This slide must be 3 seconds long at maximum and adhere to our official sponsorship slide template.

There may only be a single slide in your video to feature all of your sponsor logos. Sponsor logos may not appear anywhere else in the video. If you have multiple sponsors you must feature all of your sponsor logos on the one slide. Never superimpose your event logo or a sponsor logo over the speaker's talk or slides. Never feature rolling credits.

Slides related to sponsors must appear in the following sequence:

  1. General event intro graphics (optional)
  2. Your TEDx event logo (Required)
  3. Sponsor pre-roll card (cannot exceed 3 seconds)
  4. Talk (Required)
  5. Sponsor pre-roll card (cannot exceed 3 seconds)
  6. Post-roll card (optional)

The pre- and post-roll sponsor logo slides you display in your videos should use the layout of these templates (versions for 4:3 and 16:9 provided). If you are unable to edit these image files, recreate the layout in your image/slide editor of choice.

If you are featuring multiple sponsor logos, send a still image of your slide to tedxpostevent@ted.com for approval. Sponsor logos must appear smaller than your TEDx event's logo.

Standards
  • Resolution: Shoot and upload photos in the highest possible resolution. (For JPEGs to be considered "high resolution," they must meet or exceed a minimum of 7x5 @300 dpi.) If large file sizes cause problems having to do with bandwidth or storage, contact remy@ted.com.
  • Unedited photos only: Do not modify photos -- e.g., do not adjust contrast, color balance, apply filters or airbrush.
  • Watermarks: Do not put watermarks, text or other labels onto the photos Do not superimpose your event logo or your photographers information.
  • Credits: Credit the photographer in the digital image with metadata (never watermarks, text, etc.)
  • Youtube: Adhere to YouTube's Terms of Service and Community Guidelines with every video uploaded to the TEDxTalks YouTube channel. Before you upload any video, you must confirm that all the images, music and video clips used in your speakers' presentations are cleared for distribution on YouTube. Securing rights to any copyrighted materials is entirely the responsibility of the TEDx organizer.
Uploading to Flickr

Help keep the collection of TEDx photography clean, organized and searchable -- follow these instructions when uploading your TEDx event photos to Flickr:

  • Tag every photo: TEDx, TEDx[EventName], [photographer's name], [name of speaker(s) in photo
  • Use a Creative Commons license that matches the license TED uses for TEDTalks: "Attribution - NonCommercial - NonDerivative"
  • Join the TEDx Flickr Group
  • Once you've uploaded all your photography, send a link to your set or gallery to us
  • If you cannot access Flickr, email us
Documentary

You can shoot a documentary specific to your TEDx event, but not a general TEDx documentary.

  • No use of the TED and/or plain TEDx logos.
  • No filming inside the theatre while your event is taking place; only the designated film crew who is filming the TEDx talks is allowed into the theatre to film during talks and breaks.
  • You can shoot b-roll in break areas, but not inside the theatre.
  • TEDx talks cannot be re-edited or remixed; a maximum of 30 seconds of any TEDx Talk may be featured.

If you plan to incorporate TEDTalks shown at the event in a documentary, please read and follow the below rules:

  • Documentary filmmakers can use excerpts of TEDTalks within their films, provided the speaker agrees. TED must secure permission from each individual speaker for any use not produced by TED.
  • In order for us to approach the speaker with the request, you must provide TED with a brief from the filmmaker on the intended use of the footage, the film's perspective/point of view, and distribution plan. We also like to see brief bios on the creative team (producer, director, etc).
  • If the speaker agrees, we will provide the filmmaker with footage on a data DVD in one of our standard formats (any needed conversion will be the filmmakers' responsibility). Depending on the particular conference, footage will be delivered in one of the following formats: DVCPro NTSC, DVCPro PAL, DVCPro NTSC Anamorphic or DVCPro HD 1080i60. We do not deliver footage on tape.
  • No licensing fees are charged, but the footage must be accompanied by an on-screen credit (generally a lower-third) referencing TED.com. We prefer the language "Full talk available at TED.com.
Radio

TEDx events can be streamed live on the radio based on review and approval. Sessions and speakers should play live and uninterrupted. TEDx events must be broadcast on the radio live -- archived audio of events or talks cannot be played. TEDxTalks cannot be broadcast on the radio without further permission. Email TEDx@ted.com with your radio proposal.

 

Social media / online marketing

  • Sponsors: Never mention your event's sponsors on social media accounts -- including Twitter, Facebook, newsletter (mailing list) emails or on your blog.
  • Facebook: The name of your Facebook account should mirror the name of your event. (Set up your Facebook account as a "Page," not as a "Group" or "Profile.") Your official TEDx event logo must appear in your Facebook image. No sponsor logos are allowed. In the "Info" tab, include the below "About TED" and "About TEDx" copy:

  • Facebook: Download our Facebook information one-sheet for more info.
  • Twitter: Your Twitter account name must mirror the name of your TEDx event. (If your event name exceeds the 15-character limit allowed for Twitter names, contact us with alternative suggestions, which we must approve.) You must use your official TEDx event logo as your Twitter image. Download our twitter information one-sheet for more info
  • Email lists: Never use your email list for any purpose other than communicating information specifically about your TEDx event. Never send out mailings more than once a week.
  • Other social media channels/online marketing tools: All of the standard naming and branding rules apply. If you have a question, contact us.
  • Videos: Adhere to YouTube's Terms of Service and Community Guidelines when promoting any video on the TEDxTalks YouTube channel.

Event profiles

Filling out your event profile is mandatory. You'll need to fill out as much information as you can immediately after your license has been approved. Events profiles left blank for an extended period of time are subject to deletion, at TED's discretion. (The corresponding license will also be canceled at time of deletion.) We're strict about this rule because both the global TEDx community and the TED team rely on the data you enter to make decisions.

  • Regular updates: Update any key data at least once a week. It's crucial that you keep the general public, and TED, aware of what may have changed about your event. If your event profile has not been updated with the most current information by your event date, your next event will not be approved.
  • Required fields: You might be missing certain information about your event at the point that your license is approved. However, as soon as the relevant information becomes available, it's critical that you update the information on each of these items:
    • Your event website
    • Your event date
    • Social media pages
    • Twitter tag
    • Venue location
    • Ticket price (your ticket price must be approved by TED
    • Webcast URL (if you plan on providing a webcast)
  • Date changes: Our system will allow you to change the date of your event after your license has been approved. If you want to change your event's date, follow these steps:
    1. Go to the world map of TEDx events and review other TEDx events happening in your region/local area
    2. If your date change could affect another TEDx event -- i.e. if it is within the same 4-8 week period and close enough in proximity that your audiences might overlap -- reach out to the other TEDx organizer and discuss
    3. Once you have settled on a new date and confirmed it's acceptable to other organizers in your region, change it on your event profile page
    4. Tell us the new date
  • Webcasts: If you're planning on providing a webcast of your event, it's important to let the TEDx community know. (Other organizers may want to organize events that feature your event's webcast.) Fill in the "Webcast URL" field as soon as you know the URL. If you know you'll have a webcast but don't have the URL yet, enter your website's URL -- or a placeholder page on your website that contains information you do have about your webcast.
  • After your event: After your event, remember to add highlights to your event profile. (Adding highlights is a prerequisite for renewing your license.)
    • Add a Flickr tag
    • Add the URL of your YouTube playlist of videos
    • Make sure your speaker list is up to date
    • Upload a new photo from your event

Webcasts

  • Approval: Once you have your webcast url, please submit your webcast link for approval
  • Advertising: No advertising is permitted on or around your webcast. (You may not advertise inside the webcast. You may not place advertisements on the website hosting the webcast.)
  • Cost: Your webcast must be free to viewers.
  • Distribution: Talks and other content recorded at your event may not be distributed on broadcast television, cable television, satellite television or on-demand TV.
  • Webcast services: TEDx has a webcast channel with Livestream. We recommend you reaching out to them and they can set you up on our ad-free channel.
  • Third-party webcast services: You can broadcast your event via a third-party website or with a third-party webcast service, but make sure to submit your url for approval. (Advertisements in, on or around the webcast are not permitted.)
  • Your event profile: Add the URL of the webcast to your event profile as soon as you have it. If you know you will be webcasting your event but are unsure of the URL, add a link to your website, which should include any information about the webcast that you have so far. (Doing this will make the global TEDx community aware of your plans to offer a webcast.)
  • Webcast archive: Archiving your TEDx event webcast for the public or your attendees is not permitted. (I.e., you are not allowed to provide a stream of your event's webcast after your event has concluded.)
  • Viewing parties: You're allowed to organize viewing parties around your TEDx webcast, but no viewing party may exceed 100 attendees. Viewing parties must be free of charge to guests, and must be held in non-commercial venues (such as homes, schools or libraries).
  • Livestream Metrics: If you are using Livestream to webcast your event you can get the metrics by following our Livestream Google Analytics procedure.

Sponsors

  • Approval: As a TEDx organizer you may approach any sponsor, with the exception of sponsors on TED's list of Unacceptable Sponsors (See below)

    Sponsors that do not fall under our list of Unacceptable Sponsors or who are not on the list of the TED Sponsor List are automatically approved. For sponsors on the TED Sponsor List, you must first receive approval from the TED team by submitting them to the TEDx Sponsor Approval Form.

    The TED Sponsor List

    The TED Sponsor List is a list of sponsors who are actively engaged in TED partnership activities around the world. Before initiating contact with the TED Sponsor List (including introductions, gauging interest, etc), you must fill out the TEDx Sponsorship Approval Form. By filling out this form you will help us understand which of the TED Sponsor List you would like to approach, and the level of activation – how you would like them involved in your TEDx event. Once the TED team has provided email approval of your request, you may then reach out. You're welcome to submit to the TEDx Sponsor Approval Form for approval at any time. Please use the same form each time you need to submit a new potential TED Sponsor. When a TED Sponsor is approved for your event, it is approved for that one specific event only. You will need to reach out and reapply for sponsor approval for all subsequent TEDx events. Check the TED Sponsor List regularly, as it is subject to changes and updated.

  • Unacceptable sponsors: Under no conditions will TED allow companies or organizations who deal in the following to sponsor TEDx events:
    • Weapons/ammunition
    • Tobacco/cigarettes
    • Adult-oriented products/services
  • Editorial control: Sponsors have no editorial control or veto power over your program.
  • The stage: Sponsors may not present from the stage. No one can pay to be included in the program. Sponsor logos cannot be displayed on a TEDx stage.
Bookstores

It is in TED's tradition to partner with a bookstore and to present attendees with a selection of works from innovative and creative minds around the world. We encourage TEDx Organizers to host a literary space at their events, and recommend that you partner with a local bookstore to curate your selection.

Revenue: Partnerships with bookstores should be in-kind -- all revenues from book sales should go to the bookstore. In exchange, the bookstore will provide staffing and shipping (if applicable) of the books.

If the bookstore provides customized items such as t-shirts or mugs for sale at the event, Organizers can set-up a revenue share deal. Bookstores would be allowed to give out coupons in the gift bags.

Speakers and Bookstores: Speakers' books can be part of the selection at a TEDx event bookstore, but cannot be sold individually. Be creative! Ask one of your speakers to curate a selection of their favorite books.

Book signings: Speakers at TEDx events can sign their books, but only as part of a larger book sale, and bookstore presence.

  • Maximum contribution amount:
    • For events with less than 100 attendees, total sponsorship funding may not exceed $10,000 (in cash), this amount excludes direct cost of venue. For events with 100 attendees or less, try to reach out to as many sponsors as possible who can offer in-kind support.
    • For events with more than 100 attendees, sponsorship funding may not exceed $20,000 (in cash) per sponsor. If your budget necessitates funding above this amount, you will need to get prior written approval from TED.
  • Payment: Wherever possible, please have sponsors pay vendors directly.
  • Social media: Do not endorse your sponsors via your event's social media properties. You are not allowed to promote your sponsors on Twitter, Facebook or any other social media properties.
  • Sponsorship summary: There is a section in the TEDx Organizer Close Out Form where you can submit a summary of your event sponsorship. Sponsors must be submitted in order for your event to be considered for renewal.
  • Products and giveaways: Branded products may be given away. TEDx-branded products may only be sold at your event -- not pre/post or online. Profits from these items must go back to support your event. The TEDx logo/brand may not be licensed for commercial purposes.
  • Crowdfunding: Crowdfunding: TEDx events cannot use crowdfunding platforms -- such as IndieGoGo, Kickstarter, or other local platforms -- to raise money for any aspect of a TEDx event.

Sponsor logos on your videos: Sponsor logos may only be shown on one slide at the beginning and end of each video. This slide must be 3 seconds long at maximum and adhere to our official sponsorship slide template.

There may only be a single slide in your video to feature all of your sponsor logos. Sponsor logos may not appear anywhere else in the video. If you have multiple sponsors you must feature all of your sponsor logos on the one slide. Never superimpose your event logo or a sponsor logo over the speaker's talk or slides. Never feature rolling credits.

Slides related to sponsors must appear in the following sequence:

  1. General event intro graphics (optional)
  2. Your TEDx event logo (Required)
  3. Sponsor pre-roll card (cannot exceed 3 seconds)
  4. Talk (Required)
  5. Sponsor pre-roll card (cannot exceed 3 seconds)
  6. Post-roll card (optional)

The pre- and post-roll sponsor logo slides you display in your videos should use the layout of these templates (versions for 4:3 and 16:9 provided). If you are unable to edit these image files, recreate the layout in your image/slide editor of choice.

If you are featuring multiple sponsor logos, send a still image of your slide to tedxpostevent@ted.com for approval. Sponsor logos must appear smaller than your TEDx event's logo.


PR / press / media

  • Logos: Use your event's TEDx logo. Don't use the TED logo at any time, and don't allow journalists to use it (in print or on video). Supply journalists with your customized TEDx logo.
  • It's a TEDx event -- not TED: Don't say "TED is coming to [city name]." Don't say your event is "organized by TED," "sponsored by TED" or an "official TED event." TED staff should be the sole official spokespeople for TED and the program as a whole; any journalist seeking comment from TED should be routed through Melody Serafino and TED.
  • Press page for journalists: Ask local journalists to visit your website's media section (see below). Provide them with the URL to the TEDx program (http://www.ted.com/tedx) for detailed information on the nature of the TEDx program.
  • Press releases: All press and press releases must be routed through for approval by the TEDx program's media liaison, Melody Serafino. Press releases must contain the "About TED" and "About TEDx" text:



    As you to craft your TEDx press release, please be sure to include the following:

    1. Your TEDx event logo at the top of the release
    2. Contact information for the organizer handling press inquiries
    3. A headline
    4. Dateline -- city/state or city/country and date of release
    5. Location, date and time of your event
    6. A quote from an event organizer
    7. Links to your website, Facebook page and Twitter handle
    8. Required TEDx and TED boilerplates

  • Interviews: If you are interviewed for broadcast TV or radio, clearly state, at the very start of the segment, that your event is a TEDx event, and explain what that means (it is independently organized, etc.). Represent yourself as a participating organizer in your specific TEDx program.
  • Interview requests for TED staff: Route requests for interviews with TED staff to Melody Serafino, TEDx Media Liaison.
  • Creating a media section on your website: If you're planning on having media cover your event, create a media section on your website. Direct all your media requests to a single, consistent resource.
    • What your media section should say:
      All press requests should be sent to [name]. [Name] is the official spokesperson for TEDx[place name]. Please note that TEDx event organizers are not able to speak for the TED Conference. Any inquiry regarding TED should be sent to:
      Melody Serafino
      TEDx Media Liaison
      TEDxPR@groupsjr.com
      While we appreciate any coverage, we kindly ask that all journalists and/or bloggers be respectful of the difference between the TED and TEDx brands.
      The 'x' in 'TEDx' stands for "independently organized events." Any headline or text which implies "TED" is coming to [location] is misleading.
      For more information on TEDx, visit http://www.ted.com/tedx.
  • Having media attend your TEDx event: At TED, we keep the number of journalists to a minimum. We ask you to do the same. Only invite media you know personally.
    • Members of the press are not allowed to take pictures of or film/videotape your TEDx event. Instead, find one in-house photographer and share selections with the media.