Giles Duley began his career as a fashion photographer. When it was time for a change he found himself on a journey of war and hardship.

Why you should listen

Giles was a photographer who, some years ago, tired of celebrity photoshoots and the attendant egos and tantrums that often accompanied them. He flung his camera on the photoshoot bed and it bounced out the window into the streets of SoHo, London. At that point he decided to change course and dedicated himself to using his camera to "tell unheard stories of those caught in conflict and economic hardship around the world." His work took him to Sudan, Angola, Ukraine and Bangladesh, among other places. Early in 2011, on assignment in Afghanistan, Duley stepped on a landmine. Despite the fact that the horrific accident left Duley a triple amputee, he continues to dedicate his life to telling stories through photography.

What others say

“Do you ever have one of those mornings, when you just can't be bothered to put your legs on? ” — @gilesduley

Giles Duley’s TED talk

Giles Duley on the TED Blog

Ideas

Giles Duley launches “100 Portraits Before I Die”

August 7, 2013

“The thing about the intensive care unit is that the lights never go off and the noise is constant,” says photographer Giles Duley. He should know. After he stepped on an IED while on assignment in Afghanistan in 2011, he spent 46 days in intensive care in a hospital in his native United Kingdom. Forty-six […]

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Culture

Favorites of 2012: The power of a flashbulb

December 25, 2012

. 2012 was the year of radical openness at TED. In that spirit, while our office is closed for winter break, TED’s editorial staffers have selected their favorite talks of the year, giving you a peek into both our process and our personalities. We hope you enjoy.. TED editorial meetings are a flurry of sound. […]

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Art

6 stunning photos from Giles Duley

July 30, 2012

When Giles Duley left behind life as a music and fashion photographer and began criss-crossing the globe, photographing forgotten people — those with mental illness, living on the streets, residing in refugee camps and surviving in the crossfire of war — he felt a certain level of separation from his subjects. But then something happened […]

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