Erik Brynjolfsson examines the effects of information technologies on business strategy, productivity and employment.

Why you should listen

The director of the MIT Center for Digital Business and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, Erik Brynjolfsson asks how IT affects organizations, markets and the economy. His recent work studies data-driven decision-making, management practices that drive productivity, the pricing implications of Internet commerce and the role of intangible assets.
 
Brynjolfsson was among the first researchers to measure the productivity contributions of information and community technology (ICT) and the complementary role of organizational capital and other intangibles. His research also provided the first quantification of the value of online product variety, often known as the “Long Tail,” and developed pricing and bundling models for information goods.

His books include Wired for Innovation: How IT Is Reshaping the Economy and Race Against the Machine: How the Digital Revolution Is Accelerating Innovation, Driving Productivity and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and the Economy (with Andrew McAfee); and the recent article "Big Data: The Management Revolution" (with Andrew McAfee).

What others say

“Technology is essential for creating value and raising productivity, but it creates losers as well as winners.” — James Crabtree, Financial Times

Erik Brynjolfsson’s TED talks

Erik Brynjolfsson on the TED Blog
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Culture

Debate: Erik Brynjolfsson and Robert J. Gordon at TED2013

February 26, 2013

TED Curator Chris Anderson opened this morning’s first session, Progress Enigma, with a provocative question: What is the future of work? He asked the audience: According to your worldview, is the growth of innovation accelerating? Not surprisingly, the overwhelming majority of the audience answered yes. But is the answer so simple? Economist Robert J. Gordon […]

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Quotes from Erik Brynjolfsson

[Current economic] troubles are sometimes misdiagnosed as the end of innovation, but they are actually the growing pains of … the new machine age.
Erik Brynjolfsson
TED2013 • 935K views Apr 2013
Informative, Persuasive
Computers get better faster than anything else ever. A child's PlayStation today is more powerful than a military supercomputer from 1996.
Erik Brynjolfsson
TED2013 • 935K views Apr 2013
Informative, Persuasive
The stagnationist view is that ideas get used up like low-hanging fruit, but the reality is that each innovation creates building blocks for even more innovations.
Erik Brynjolfsson
TED2013 • 935K views Apr 2013
Informative, Persuasive