Chris Anderson is an authority on emerging technologies and the cultures that surround them.

Why you should listen

Before Chris Anderson took over as editor of WIRED, he spent seven years at The Economist, where he worked as editor of both the technology and business sections. Anderson holds a degree in physics and has conducted research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and has done stints at the leading journals Nature and Science.

(He is not, however, to be confused with the curator of TED, who has the same name.)

He's perhaps most famous for coining the term "the long tail," a whiteboard favorite that describes the business strategy of pursuing many little fish (versus a few big fish), as typified by both Amazon and Netflix. Anderson first introduced the term in an article written for WIRED in 2004; the book-length version, The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business Is Selling Less of More, became a bestseller. He maintains a blog, The Long Tail, which he updates with impressive regularity.

Chris Anderson’s TED talk

More news and ideas from Chris Anderson

We humans

Why ideas matter … now more than ever

June 29, 2016

It might seem as if our interconnected world is unraveling, if last week's Brexit vote is anything to go by. But it's now, says TED curator Chris Anderson, that great ideas can help knit humanity together.

Continue reading
Live from TEDSummit 2016

A legacy that will outlive us: Notes from Session 1 of TEDSummit

June 27, 2016

TEDSummit is a gathering of TED’s tribes — our speaker community, volunteer translators, TED Fellows, TEDx organizers, partners and  more. In Session 1, we shared mainstage talks that sparkled with optimism for humanity — now and deep into our unknown future. Ideas that stand the test of time. TED’s curator, Chris Anderson, opened TEDSummit with a throwback […]

Continue reading
News

The new-look TED.com homepage

June 7, 2016

Today, you can see TED.com's fresh new homepage design, the visual manifestation of our ongoing work to make sure that TED remains as relevant and vital now as it was when we shared our first six talks back in 2006.

Continue reading