Physicist Brian Cox has two jobs: working with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and explaining big science to the general public. He's a professor at the University of Manchester.

Why you should listen

Based at the University of Manchester, Brian Cox works at CERN in Geneva on the ATLAS experiment, studying the forward proton detectors for the Large Hadron Collider there. He's a professor at the University of Manchester, working in the High Energy Physics group, and is a research fellow of the Royal Society.

He's also become a vital voice in the UK media for explaining physics to the public. With his rockstar hair and accessible charm, he's the go-to physicist for explaining heady concepts on British TV and radio. (If you're in the UK, watch him on The Big Bang Machine.) He was the science advisor for the 2007 film Sunshine. He answers science questions every Friday on BBC6 radio's Breakfast Show.

What others say

“If people don’t have an understanding of what science is and what scientists do, then they can tend to think that global warming, for example, is just a matter of opinion.” — Brian Cox in Seed magazine

Brian Cox’s TED talks

Brian Cox on the TED Blog
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Science

Why we need the explorers: Brian Cox on TED.com

June 3, 2010

In tough economic times, our exploratory science programs — from space probes to the LHC — are first to suffer budget cuts. Brian Cox explains how curiosity-driven science pays for itself, powering innovation and a profound appreciation of our existence. (Recorded at TEDSalon London 2010, April 2010 in London, England. Duration: 16:29) Watch Brian Cox’s […]

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Science

LHC back in action

November 20, 2009

Tonight scientists at CERN are rebooting the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) in an attempt to recreate conditions fractions of a second after the Big Bang by crashing opposing proton beams, traveling at nearly the speed of light, into one another. Shortly after the LHC’s debut last September, a manufacturing glitch in wiring led to a […]

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Large Hadron Collider set to try again in November

August 11, 2009

Last week, CERN announced that the world’s largest particle accelerator will power up again in November. However this time it will run on 3.5 trillion electron volts per beam, about half its expected energy level. Last year, the LHC shut down because of a fault between two superconducting bending magnets but recent tests have confirmed […]

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Quotes from Brian Cox

The aim of particle physics is to understand what everything’s made of, and how everything sticks together. By everything I mean me and you, the Earth, the Sun, the 100 billion suns in our galaxy and the 100 billion galaxies in the observable universe. Absolutely everything.
Brian Cox
TED2008 • 2.6M views Apr 2008
Fascinating, Informative
The Large Hadron Collider is the largest scientific experiment ever attempted — 27 kilometers in circumference. Its job is to re-create the conditions that were present less than a billionth of a second after the universe began, up to 600 million times a second. It’s nothing if not ambitious.
Brian Cox
TED2009 • 729K views May 2009
Informative, Fascinating
Nothing is so dangerous to the progress of the human mind than to assume that our views of science are ultimate, that there are no mysteries in nature, that our triumphs are complete, and that there are no new worlds to conquer.
Brian Cox
TED2009 • 729K views May 2009
Informative, Fascinating