Physicist Brian Cox has two jobs: working with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and explaining big science to the general public. He's a professor at the University of Manchester.

Why you should listen

Based at the University of Manchester, Brian Cox works at CERN in Geneva on the ATLAS experiment, studying the forward proton detectors for the Large Hadron Collider there. He's a professor at the University of Manchester, working in the High Energy Physics group, and is a research fellow of the Royal Society.

He's also become a vital voice in the UK media for explaining physics to the public. With his rockstar hair and accessible charm, he's the go-to physicist for explaining heady concepts on British TV and radio. (If you're in the UK, watch him on The Big Bang Machine.) He was the science advisor for the 2007 film Sunshine. He answers science questions every Friday on BBC6 radio's Breakfast Show.

What others say

“If people don’t have an understanding of what science is and what scientists do, then they can tend to think that global warming, for example, is just a matter of opinion.” — Brian Cox in Seed magazine

Brian Cox’s TED talks

Brian Cox on the TED Blog
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News

7 things learned from a day spent watching TEDxCERN

September 26, 2014

Wednesday marked the second-ever TEDxCERN, the event organized by the folks at CERN, the famed particle physics research center in Geneva, Switzerland, responsible for bringing us the World Wide Web, the Large Hadron Collider, and confirmation of the existence of the Higgs boson. You know, just a few minor things. TEDxCERN brought together a mix […]

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Inside the Animator's Studio

How do you animate cosmic rays? The story behind a TEDxCERN TED-Ed lesson

September 24, 2014

On September 24, TEDxCERN was hosted by physicist Brian Cox (watch his TED Talk: “CERN’s supercollider“), and the world was welcomed to watch for free. Below, an appetite-whetter that originally ran on the TEDx Innovations Blog. Cosmic rays. Active galactic nuclei. Nucleosynthesis. For physicist Veronica Bindi, this is everyday vocabulary. A ten-year collaborator with AMS-02 — an experiment analyzing […]

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Science

Why we need the explorers: Brian Cox on TED.com

June 3, 2010

In tough economic times, our exploratory science programs — from space probes to the LHC — are first to suffer budget cuts. Brian Cox explains how curiosity-driven science pays for itself, powering innovation and a profound appreciation of our existence. (Recorded at TEDSalon London 2010, April 2010 in London, England. Duration: 16:29) Watch Brian Cox’s […]

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Quotes from Brian Cox

The aim of particle physics is to understand what everything’s made of, and how everything sticks together. By everything I mean me and you, the Earth, the Sun, the 100 billion suns in our galaxy and the 100 billion galaxies in the observable universe. Absolutely everything.
Brian Cox
TED2008 • 2.7M views Apr 2008
Fascinating, Informative
The Large Hadron Collider is the largest scientific experiment ever attempted — 27 kilometers in circumference. Its job is to re-create the conditions that were present less than a billionth of a second after the universe began, up to 600 million times a second. It’s nothing if not ambitious.
Brian Cox
TED2009 • 748K views May 2009
Informative, Fascinating
Nothing is so dangerous to the progress of the human mind than to assume that our views of science are ultimate, that there are no mysteries in nature, that our triumphs are complete, and that there are no new worlds to conquer.
Brian Cox
TED2009 • 748K views May 2009
Informative, Fascinating