Lausanne
x = independently organized TED event

Theme: Perpetual (r)evolution

This event occurred on
February 10, 2014
2:00pm - 7:00pm (UTC +1hrs)
Lausanne, VD
Switzerland

We are thrilled to announce TEDxLausanne 2014 at the University of Lausanne Amphimax! Our event, themed “perpetual (r)evolution”, will feature carefully selected speakers who will take you on a journey from which you’ll emerge inspired, stimulated and ready to catch your next opportunity for (r)evolution.

The world we live in is constantly evolving, causing us to continually reinvent ourselves and the ways we interact with what’s around us to keep fresh, engaged and dynamic. What are the ingredients needed for transformative reinvention? In our culture of constant innovation, what are the elements that must remain stable? What revolutions are happening now or seriously need to happen? What are the catalysts for these dramatic transitions and can they be influenced?

Change to live and live for change. This is the essence of the theme of our next event: perpetual (r)evolution.

University of Lausanne
University of Lausanne
Lausanne, VD, 1015
Switzerland
Event type:
Standard (What is this?)
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Speakers

Speakers may not be confirmed. Check event website for more information.

Manuel Klarmann

The food we eat three times a day, 365 days a year has a colossal impact on our planet’s health. Indeed, one third of our greenhouse gas emissions originate from our food consumption. What can the average consumer do to counter their CO2 footprint? Smart decisions and free public scientific data along the food’s supply chain is essential for society to embrace its responsibility and change the current course of action. With his story, Manuel will address those issues and discuss the latest results in life-cycle-assessments on food productions. An entrepreneur at heart and a food lover, Manuel Klarmann kicked off his initiative Eaternity in 2009. His company calculates the CO2 footprint of menus for restaurants, enabling the chefs and consumers to make an informed decision on their environmental footprint. Eaternity develops its vision and projects with many notable large customers such as the ETH and the city of Zurich; it has also won several awards, such as the Impact HUB Fellowship and the SEIF Award.

Andrew Sharmann

One of Andrew’s passions is safety. He’s defined his career in helping companies keep their people safe from harm and by elevating safety to the top of the leadership agenda. Is it surprising then that his other passions include paragliding, extreme sports, and swimming with sharks? In this talk, Andrew argues that despite enjoying unprecedented levels of safety, our society promotes a ‘culture of fear’ to cope with the uncertainty and change we face in our lives. Under the cloak of anxiety, modern society advocates hesitancy and over-precaution as virtuous rationale for inaction. The busier we are with our lives, the narrower our paths become as we choose comfort over transformative thinking. Andrew takes us on a personal journey about the evolution of fear into a positive force. In his talk he offers a technique for reframing our perspectives on risk and harnessing the power of our fears in order to reinvigorate our interactions with the world.

Omer Polak

Omer Polak is a designer and artist. His recent projects focus on our sensory experience of the world. Omer is using multi-disciplinary and collaborative approaches to create new experiences that could change the life of the viewer/participant. Omer has been honored at the Core77 design awards (Food Design) in 2013. The sense of smell is central to our everyday life. It is a major component of our taste perception; it warns us against danger and affects our mood. It also has quite an influence on our sexual attraction and pair bonding. But are we fully aware of all this influence? Can we smell fear or happiness? How do people with an impaired olfactory perception cope with it? Omer Polak tells us how design innovation and neuroscience offer us a new way to experience the world.

Ellen Hertz

Ellen is an inspirational professor whose passion is “everyday democracy”. She is an anthropologist trained in law, linguistics, Chinese studies, and currently heading the Anthropology Institute of the University of Neuchâtel. Ellen incites us to think beyond conformity, to act against inevitability and to exercise our capacity to question and to debate. She is currently heading a research project on Intangible Cultural Heritage in Switzerland in connection with UNESCO. Ellen was born in the USA and lives in Fribourg. In traditional societies, elders defend their positions of power by invoking “tradition”. In modern consumer societies, change and innovation have become the new dogma. In fact, such seemingly “naturel” processes as administrative reform or planned obsolescence keep some groups in power and disempower others. Ellen argues that the content, shape and speed of change are the result of human decision-making; they are not inevitable. Ellen explains how people can have their say in these decisions.

Ella Ronen

Born and raised in Israel to a European mother and Iranian father, Ella Ronen grew up with a colorful mix of music and culture. She has been singing classical music and writing poems since childhood. It was only later, when discovering the art of Leonard Cohen, Joni Mitchell and Bob Dylan, that she understood she could combine both of these loves: music and poetry. Since then she has been performing in Switzerland and Israel, and will release her debut album this spring.

Eleanor Khonje

Development ought to be about community transformation, about local and global social justice, about making a difference and serving communities to create a truly just world, no matter what that implies, or where it needs to be done. Development and the action of making a difference should be synonymous and usable interchangeably. Born in Malawi, and raised in England, Alabama, and Texas, whilst currently residing in Geneva, Eleanor T. Khonje is passionate about broadening the conversation on development precisely because of her experiences living and working in these different contexts. Eleanor believes that if we were all committed to serving our local as much as our global communities, we would see a reinvention of the world around us. Eleanor works as the Managing Editor of OURS, a multicultural magazine of artistic and social expression for the conscious and critical cosmopolitan, based in Geneva.

Helen and Gilles

Ever since they’ve seen Lindy Hop, Helen and Gilles have been inspired by it. They loved the improvisation, expressiveness and musicality that have been the hallmarks of this dance since it began in Harlem of the 1930s. Travelling across Europe to learn from the best, they discovered and enjoyed a wide variety of social dancing. They now share their passion for this fluid, high energy dance style by teaching and organizing events in Fribourg and Lausanne

Laura Schwengber

How can deaf people enjoy and experience a rock concert? A childhood friendship challenged by sight and hearing impairment led Laura Schwengber to study Sign Language in her native Germany and combine this with her love of dancing, singing and acting. A certified interpreter of German sign language and a teacher-in-training, Laura is in high demand as she complements the music and lyrics of popular bands and orchestras to make this accessible to deaf people too. Laura believes that ‘a revolution can only occur if we do it ourselves. I can sign, I can interpret, I can do music, so let’s make the spirit of music accessible to all!’ In her talk Laura interprets the lyrics of two songs with Ella Ronen, performing together with Alexandre Maurer (percussion) and Florian Favre (keyboard).

Yu-kai Chou

Yu-kai Chou is an entrepreneur, speaker, and gamification pioneer. Early in life, he had the epiphany that while games had the power to delight and engage the mind, they were not productive and only resulted in emotional gains. He became obsessed with the combination of how to make games more productive, and simultaneously, how to make life more fun. Since then, he has created a variety of game-based technology startups. In 2012, he stepped down as CEO of his startup and published his gamification framework Octalysis, which has since been translated into nine languages. He is now a full-time consultant and speaker on gamification. In his talk, he will tell us some ways in which gamification has been used and could be used in the future to make the world a better, more sustainable, and more fun place to live our lives.

Tej Tadi

Dr Tej Tadi, a neuroscientist, founded MindMaze in 2011 to develop technologies that help patients recover from brain injuries. Last year his company successfully launched devices, which use virtual reality, brain imaging and gaming technologies to retrain the brain in stroke victims. MindMaze is now developing solutions for spinal cord injury and amputee patients. Our brain decodes the world for us but what would happen if it malfunctioned? This happens daily to millions of patients around the world, seriously impairing their ability to carry out simple tasks we take for granted. Dr Tej Tadi explains his revolutionary multidisciplinary, multisensory approach which uses novel diagnostic and therapeutic metrics to accelerate brain recovery. He also gives tips on how to translate a concept into business reality.

Guido Palazzo

Guido Palazzo is a professor of business ethics at the University of Lausanne. He is passionate about understanding the dark side of the force and in his research he examines unethical decision making from various angles. While mainly known for his studies on the impact of globalization on corporate responsibility, he also studies unethical behaviour within organizations and the impact of organized crime on business and society. Consumers buy and throw away stuff at an ever-increasing speed with an increasing negative impact on the common good and paradoxically also on the well-being of the individual consumers themselves. At the beginning of the 21st century, humanity is confronted with large-scale social and environmental risks such as global warming, chemical pollution, ocean acidification, and water scarcity. While some corporations have started to innovate their production, attempts to mainstream sustainable consumption have failed spectacularly. Guido’s talk presents new ideas about how to change the hearts and minds of consumers.

Domenica Bueti

Time is both a pervasive and elusive dimension of everyday experiences. Enjoying music, dancing, scheduling daily routines, or even simply walking would be impossible activities if we would not be able to accurately keep track of the time flow. But how does the human mind master time? Despite the immateriality and the subjectivity of our experience of time, recent discoveries in the field of cognitive neuroscience are now disclosing the neurophysiological mechanisms and the brain networks subserving human abilities to perceive time. Domenica Bueti is an Italian neuroscientist who after psychology training in Italy moved to the United Kingdom. Through the use of modern neuroimaging techniques her work focuses on understanding the neural mechanisms and the cognitive architectures that subserve human abilities to perceive, represent, and manipulate information about time. She is now senior research scientist at the Department of Clinical Neurosciences of the University Hospital of Lausanne.

John Zimmer

John began his career in Toronto, as a lawyer specialized in international relations. In 1998, he moved to Geneva to pursue an international career. He has worked at the United Nations, the International Organization for Migration and the World Health Organization. He is also a speaker and presentation skills trainer. John is the editor of mannerofspeaking.org, a popular blog about public speaking followed by readers worldwide, and he is the co-creator of Rhetoric – The Public Speaking Game™. Graduation is a significant moment in our lives; it represents a major step in our personal evolution. It is not always an easy step to take, with its contradictory mix of fear and excitement. However, venturing into the unknown provides us with a great opportunity for personal growth. Graduation isn’t just for young people — we can “graduate” many times in our lives because we can always step into the unknown. When are you graduating?

Manuel Klarmann

The food we eat three times a day, 365 days a year has a colossal impact on our planet’s health. Indeed, one third of our greenhouse gas emissions originate from our food consumption. What can the average consumer do to counter their CO2 footprint? Smart decisions and free public scientific data along the food’s supply chain is essential for society to embrace its responsibility and change the current course of action. With his story, Manuel will address those issues and discuss the latest results in life-cycle-assessments on food productions. An entrepreneur at heart and a food lover, Manuel Klarmann kicked off his initiative Eaternity in 2009. His company calculates the CO2 footprint of menus for restaurants, enabling the chefs and consumers to make an informed decision on their environmental footprint. Eaternity develops its vision and projects with many notable large customers such as the ETH and the city of Zurich; it has also won several awards, such as the Impact HUB Fellowship and the SEIF Award.

Organizing team

Simon
Schneebeli

Lausanne, Switzerland
Organizer