NASAJSCWomen
x = independently organized TED event

This event occurred on
December 1, 2011
9:00am - 12:00pm CST
(UTC -6hrs)
Houston, TX
United States

Join TEDxNASAJSCWomen for an extraordinary discussion on inspiring students, engineering innovation, new scientific discoveries and perspectives from space. The TEDxNASAJSC planning team with support of the JSC Directors and the Office of Equality Opportunity and Diversity, hosted this event in NASA’s Teague auditorium.

FULL EVENT PLAYLIST here:
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsRNoUx8w3rNcTa_6HKEZsYVQ0YuQbzeT

Welcome
• ELLEN OCHOA
3 time shuttle mission payload specialist and JSC Deputy Center Director on womens progress

First Joining NASA
• JESSIE FERNANDEZ
on starting work at NASA

NASA Education: Building the Next Generation of Explorers
• CINDY MCARTHUR
head of NASA’s Teaching From Space Office on Space Education

Engineering Innovation
• LORA BAILEY
lead for shuttle return to flight tile repair and now SE&I lead for the AES Deep Space Hab speaks on Engineering Innovation

STEM Education: the Root of our Future
• DOTTIE METCALF-LINDENBURGER
astronaut perspective on STEM education as key to future world challenges

Why 6 months in Space is not enough
• CADY COLEMAN

Experiments that Can't Be Done on Earth
• JULIE ROBINSON
ISS chief scientist on the amazing capabilities of our orbiting lab

Exploring the Solar System with a Microscope
• KEIKO NAKAMURA-MESSENGER
first Japanese female to the South Pole and discoverer of 2 new minerals

Johnson Space Center
2101 NASA Parkway
Houston, TX, 77058
United States
Event type:
TEDxWomen (What is this?)
See more ­T­E­Dx­N­A­S­A­J­S­C­Women events

Speakers

Speakers may not be confirmed. Check event website for more information.

Ellen Ochoa

Dr. Ochoa became the first Hispanic woman to go to space when she served on a nine-day mission aboard the shuttle Discovery in 1993. She has flown in space four times, logging nearly 1,000 hours. Prior to her astronaut career, Dr. Ochoa was a research engineer and an inventor, with three patents for optical systems. Since this event, she was named Director of NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. She is honored to have two schools named for her, the Ellen Ochoa Middle School in Pasco, WA, and the Ellen Ochoa Learning Center in Cudahy, CA.

Jessie Fernandez

Jessie is a returning JSC intern.

Cindy McArthur

Cindy McArthur serves as the project manager for Teaching From Space (TFS), a NASA K-12 education office located in the Astronaut Office at JSC She leads a team of former classroom teachers who create NASA resources and learning opportunities designed to make Science, Technical, Engineering, Math (STEM) exciting and interesting both for educators and students. Each experience and resource offered by TFS is intended to be unique and accessible and to provide real-life connections to NASA missions, content, facilities, and people. The office is responsible for education activities that take place on the ground, in the air, and on-orbit. These activities are provided at NASA Centers around the country. Information on TFS is found at: www.nasa.gov/education/tfs. Cindy is a former elementary school teacher and also has experience in informal education. She has been with NASA Education for fourteen years and is the author of a NASA early childhood educator guide.

Lora Bailey

Lora Bailey has worked in the Engineering Directorate at JSC for 25 years and has a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Cincinnati and a Masters in Mechanical Engineering from Rice University. She has led numerous projects as project manager, and has many hardware end items that have been flown and are currently used on the International Space Station as well as other articles and experiments which were previously flown on the Space Shuttle. She led the post-Columbia return-to-flight effort as project manager for tile repair and repair access in Extra-Vehicular Activity, which led to her innovations in developing a new tile repair method as well as developing the 3-degree-of-freedom simulator of the Space Shuttle robotic arm and 50-foot damage inspection boom. This simulator provided a ground test bed for astronaut evaluation of tile repair feasibility and access, which ultimately proved that tile repair could be performed using the Shuttle robotic arm and 50-foot boom, and was validated in an on-orbit flight experiment on STS-121. The new tile repair method was developed and flew on STS-114 and subsequent Space Shuttle missions.

Dottie Metcalf-Lindenburger

Dottie Metcalf-Lindenburger received her Bachelor of Arts in Geology from Whitman College and Teaching Certification from Central Washington University. She taught high school earth science and astronomy, as well as coached cross-country and Science Olympiad. Dottie completed undergraduate research with the KECK Consortium for two summers: 1995 in Wyoming mapping the last glaciations of Russell Creek, and 1996 mapping and determining the petrology of the rocks in the Wet Mountain region of Colorado. Dottie was selected as an astronaut in May 2004. In 2010 she was a mission specialist on the crew of STS-131 and has logged over 362 hours in space.

Sherry Hatcher

Sherry Hatcher is the Federal Women’s Program Manager for Johnson Space Center. She joined the JSC Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity in 2008. She claims Texas as home, but has lived most of her adult life throughout the U.S. and overseas. She began her federal service career as a teacher in Misawa Japan, and has held a variety of positions in Nebraska, Crete, Greece, Wyoming, Ohio and Alaska. She loves the beautiful fall weather in Houston and enjoys walking her dogs Beau and Kona.

Sherry Hatcher

Sherry Hatcher is the Federal Women’s Program Manager for Johnson Space Center. She joined the JSC Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity in 2008. She claims Texas as home, but has lived most of her adult life throughout the U.S. and overseas. She began her federal service career as a teacher in Misawa Japan, and has held a variety of positions in Nebraska, Crete, Greece, Wyoming, Ohio and Alaska. She loves the beautiful fall weather in Houston and enjoys walking her dogs Beau and Kona.

Courtney McManus

Courtney McManus is a recent graduate from Purdue University with a degree in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering and is now working in the International Liaison Office in Mission Operations Directorate (MOD). She participated in JSC’s co-op program from 2008 to 2010, working in MOD, Engineering, and at the White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico. Courtney is originally from Kansas and attributes her passion for space as stemming from the fact that there was nothing interesting to look at on the ground, so she was always staring at the sky.

Cady Coleman

Dr. Cady Coleman is a NASA Astronaut, a retired Air Force Colonel, and a veteran of 3 space flights. She returned this past May from a 6 month mission to the ISS as part of the Expedition 26 and 27 crews, launching and landing in Kazakhstan aboard a Russian Soyuz rocket. Her international crew of 6 hosted a record number of supply ships and space shuttles. These brought new modules, experiments and supplies to the space station which is certified to operate thru 2020. Coleman, a polymer scientist by trade, participated in many of the 150 experiments aboard the space station in the areas of fluid physics, material science, technology demonstration and human physiology. She is excited to share her stories of life aboard the International Space Station.

Julie Robinson

Dr. Julie Robinson is the Program Scientist for the International Space Station (ISS). She serves as the chief scientist for the ISS Program, representing all ISS research disciplines and providing information and recommendations both inside and outside of the agency. As ISS Program Scientist, she has overseen the transition of the laboratory from the assembly period, with just a few dozen active investigations, to full utilization, with hundreds of active investigations. Dr. Robinson has an interdisciplinary background in the physical and biological sciences. Her professional experience has included research activities in a variety of fields, including virology, analytical chemistry, genetics, statistics, field biology, and remote sensing. She has authored over 50 scientific publications.

Keiko Nakamura-Messenger

Right after Nakamura-Messenger received her PhD in material science from Kobe University, Japan in 2002, she joined Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate at JSC. She is currently the deputy curation lead and a science team member for NASA's Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission. She is also a science team member of Japanese Hayabusa2 mission. Nakamura-Messenger has extensive experience with the curation and analysis of extraterrestrial materials, including: Stardust mission samples, interplanetary dust particles, and primitive meteorites. She is the lead discoverer of two new minerals, Brownleeite (MnSi) from a cometary dust and Wassonite (TiS) from Yamato 691 meteorite. Asteroid 7862 Keikonakamura (1981 EE28) is named after her for her work revealed the existence of organic globules in meteorites, furthering understanding of organic material in the solar system.

Dolores Petropulos

Dolores Petropulos received an AS degree in Criminal Justice from Valencia in 1976, She was hired as an Orlando Police Officer and attended the JC Stone Memorial Police Academy. She spent 28 years as an Orlando Police Officer and retired in November 2006. Dolores had dreamed of getting a degree in programming since she got her first computer in 1991. (Dolores is now a JSC intern working with software for the Morpheus lander)

Organizing team

Pamela
McCraw

Houston, TX, United States
Organizer

Edward (Ted)
Kenny

Houston, TX, United States
Co-organizer
  • T.Q. Bui
    Organizer