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Speaker's Footnotes

Relevant notes and citations provided to TED by Miriam Zoila Pérez.

  • 01:14

    "There is a growing body of research examining the relationship between chronic stress and illness. Things like heart disease and even cancer are being shown to have a relationship to stress."

    There are many studies and articles looking at this connection, but a comprehensive overview of this connection exists in Dr. Gabor Mate’s book, When the Body Says No: Exploring the Stress-Disease Connection

  • 02:02

    "Stress during pregnancy is linked with things like high blood pressure and low infant birth weight."

    The statistics about the connections between stress, race and maternal health can be found in this research summary put out by a group of maternal health advocacy organizations. It pulls from thirty different studies of maternal health.

  • 03:02

    "Harvard professor Dr. David Williams, the person who pioneered the tools that have proven these linkages, says that the more marginalized groups in our society experience more discrimination and more impacts on their health."

    Dr. David Williams, a professor of public health, sociology and African-American history at Harvard University, has developed three empirical tools that have demonstrated the linkages between increased discrimination and poor health. You can learn more about his work in this Colorlines Q&A with him.

  • 04:04

    "In certain parts of the country, particularly in the Deep South, the rates of mother and infant death actually approximate those rates in Sub-Saharan Africa. In those same communities, the rates for white women are near zero."

    These high rates of maternal mortality, particularly in Chicksaw County, Missippippi, are elaborated in this report, Reproductive Injustice, by the Center for Reproductive Rights.

  • 04:45

    "Native women also suffer from higher rates of these problems than white women, as do some groups of Latinas."

    The statistics about the connections between stress, race and maternal health can be found in this research summary put out by a group of maternal health advocacy organizations. It pulls from thirty different studies of maternal health.

  • 06:07

    "People like me, born in the US to Cuban immigrant parents, are actually more likely to have worse health than our grandparents did. It’s what researchers call the "immigrant paradox" and it further illustrates that there is something in the US environment that is making us sick."

    This is one of many studies looking at the fact that native-born children of immigrants tend to have worse health outcomes than their foreign-born parents.

  • 06:47

    "Meet Jennie Joseph."

    You can learn more about Jennie Joseph and her approach to maternal health care in this profile and Q&A published in Rewire.