Mark Kendall aims to shake up how vaccines are delivered with the Nanopatch.

Why you should listen

Looking a bit like a fuzzy computer chip, the Nanopatch uses tiny powder-coated spikes to deliver a small dose of vaccine just under the skin, immunizing a person in about a minute. Made for less than $1, it uses only a fraction of a vaccine dose delivered by traditional syringe method (which was invented in 1853), at the same time eliminating the risk of needle injuries. What’s more, a Nanopatch infused with vaccine is designed to be heat-stable, so it can be transported without refrigeration. And the process doesn't draw blood, reducing the risk of infections.

Mark Kendall, an Australian biomedical engineer, was part of a team at the University of Queensland that advanced the Nanopatch by vaccinating animals. Now his company, Vaxxas, is on a mission to commercialize the device for human use. He plans to run an international trial using the Nanopatch, starting with the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine to protect against cervical cancer.

What others say

"Kendall used his fluid mechanics expertise to devise a gas-jet method to powder-coat the spikes with vaccine ingredients. Coupling this with new insights into the mechanical properties of human skin, he was able to create a device that can deliver a minute dose of dry vaccine right where it is needed." — RolexAwards.com

Mark Kendall on the TED Blog

Live from TEDGlobal 2013

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Mark Kendall has a new medical invention that will make anyone with a fear of needles very happy: the Nanopatch, a tiny square (smaller than a postage stamp) that can deliver a dose of vaccine. But beyond solving needle-phobia, the Nanopatch could solve many other problems that now keep vaccines from being completely effective. Kendall, a […]

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