The dismal science of economics is not as firmly grounded in actual behavior as was once supposed. In "Predictably Irrational," Dan Ariely told us why.

Why you should listen

Dan Ariely is a professor of psychology and behavioral economics at Duke University and a founding member of the Center for Advanced Hindsight. He is the author of the bestsellers Predictably Irrational, The Upside of Irrationality, and The Honest Truth About Dishonesty. Through his research and his (often amusing and unorthodox) experiments, he questions the forces that influence human behavior and the irrational ways in which we often all behave.

What others say

“If you want to know why you always buy a bigger television than you intended, or why you think it's perfectly fine to spend a few dollars on a cup of coffee at Starbucks, or why people feel better after taking a 50-cent aspirin but continue to complain of a throbbing skull when they're told the pill they took just cost one penny, Ariely has the answer.” — Daniel Gross, Newsweek

Dan Ariely on the TED Blog
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Live from TED

Death, disaster and drugs: A recap of TED University 2015

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Audience members give talks during a session of TED University. From Ebola to better businesses, from diabetes to disasters, the talks took on big topics: A type-A response to Type 2 diabetes. Kicking off the session, Laurie Coots shares her personal story of how she beat Type 2 diabetes and regained control over her health. […]

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Design

A visual look at 7 things that make us feel good about work

April 19, 2013

Last week, Dan Ariely asked an interesting question in a TED Talk: “What makes us feel good about our work?” The TED Blog responded with the post “7 fascinating studies about what motivates us at work,” rounding up research — from both Ariely and other psychologists — that speaks to some of the surprising factors […]

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Business

What motivates us at work? 7 fascinating studies that give insights

April 10, 2013

“When we think about how people work, the naïve intuition we have is that people are like rats in a maze,” says behavioral economist Dan Ariely in today’s talk, given at TEDxRiodelaPlata. “We really have this incredibly simplistic view of why people work and what the labor market looks like.” When you look carefully at […]

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