TED Community » Jessica Green

About Me

Jessica Green is co-founder and CTO of Phylagen, Inc., a data harvesting company that uses microbiome sequencing technology to create healthy buildings and cities. She is also an Alec and Kay Keith Professor the University of Oregon, where she is founding director of the Biology and Built Environment Center, and external faculty at the Santa Fe Institute. She internationally recognized for her research in ecology and evolution, with highly cited articles in Nature, Science, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Her work has been featured in Forbes, Time, NPR, Discover, Scientific American, and the New Scientist. She has been honored with a Blaise Pascale Research Chair, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a TED Senior Fellowship. She completed a PhD in nuclear engineering at UC Berkeley, and earned a BS in civil and environmental engineering at UCLA.

Location:
United States, Eugene, OR
Current organization:
University of Oregon
Current role:
Professor
Gender:
Female
Areas of expertise:
Ecology and Evolution, Microbial Ecology, Environmental Engineering, Theoretical Biology, biodiversity
I am:
Athlete, Educator/Teacher, Environmentalist, Idea generator, Parent, Scientist, World traveler
Languages:
English
My website links:
Green Lab, Biology and Built Environment (BioBE) Center, Jessica Lee Green
Universities:
University of California, Berkeley, University of California, Los Angeles
TED conferences attended:
TED2015, TED2013, TEDGlobal 2012, TED2012, TEDGlobal 2011, TED2011, TEDWomen 2010, TED2010

TEDCRED 200+ TED SpeakerTED FellowTED Attendee

More About Me

I'm passionate about

Optimizing the design and operation of buildings and cities to promote the growth of beneficial microbes and to suppress the growth of harmful ones.

Talk to me about

The urban microbiome, visualizing the invisible, microbial metagenomics.

People don't know that I'm good at

Roller skating backwards.

Comments

  • TEDCred score: +253.00 TEDCred reflects your contribution to the TED community.

  • A reply on Conversation: Does urban âgreenâ harbor healthier microbes?

    May 22 2013: Hi Laurel - I would need to research it more but I'm not sure that the evidence so far points to having a higher risk of allergies in the country versus the city. Check out this TED Convo my biological diversity class just hosted http://www.ted.com/conversations/18008/purell_now_bacteri_ell_later.html
  • A reply on Conversation: Does urban âgreenâ harbor healthier microbes?

    May 22 2013: I agree - and I believe this would entail research on the human microbiome.
  • A reply on Conversation: Does urban âgreenâ harbor healthier microbes?

    May 22 2013: Wow Ben you flipped it. So this makes me think about the impact of the urban microbiome on the health of urban gardens and urban spaces. I wonder if there is a link? I wouldn't be surprised.
  • +1

    A reply on Conversation: Does urban âgreenâ harbor healthier microbes?

    May 22 2013: Yes Janielle - spot on. I don't think it's only that we're trying to increase densities in cities. It's my understanding that the rise of megacities is happening whether we like it or not.

    Laurel you might like this - from the Financial Times http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/2/a4c94be4-6ad6-11e2-9871-00144feab49a.html#axzz2U2riJMU3
  • A reply on Conversation: Does urban âgreenâ harbor healthier microbes?

    May 22 2013: Gwynne will know the most about this. It has to do with building code, what it takes to change code, and how long it takes.
  • A reply on Conversation: Does urban âgreenâ harbor healthier microbes?

    May 22 2013: What do you think are the major factors that influence change in city planning? How much is scientific data used? Do you think that microbiome data, if it is ultimately shown to have strong links to health, would play a role?
  • A reply on Conversation: Does urban âgreenâ harbor healthier microbes?

    May 22 2013: Do you have ideas about how we might tease apart the different mechanisms at play? If stress hormone levels are reduced by spending time in green spaces - how do we figure out what the cause is? How do we know if it is due to the urban microbiome or, for example, a direct impact on physiology/brain function?
  • A reply on Conversation: Does urban âgreenâ harbor healthier microbes?

    May 22 2013: Great point. We have been thinking about the BioBE Center http://biobe.uoregon.edu/ about the spatial distance of a person's microbial "aura". You are taking this to another level and thinking about the spatial distance of a green space "aura".
  • +1

    A reply on Conversation: Does urban âgreenâ harbor healthier microbes?

    May 22 2013: OK so you totally need to check out last year's TED Convo where we cover this (http://www.ted.com/conversations/11577/if_green_roofs_were_mandatory.html). Also today my Biological Diversity Class is talking about rooftop beekeeping http://www.ted.com/conversations/18440/can_urban_beehives_increase_fo.html.

    Which makes me think .... I wonder how efforts like urban beehives influence the urban microbiome?
  • A reply on Conversation: Does urban âgreenâ harbor healthier microbes?

    May 22 2013: It is my sense after spending time at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation yesterday - http://www.rwjf.org/en/about-rwjf/newsroom/features-and-articles/what-s-next-health.html -
    that a number of big health care providers across the US are investing in health equity. So I think it would fall into that class of efforts.
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