Phillip Beaver

Citizen, Humankind
Baton Rouge, LA, United States

About Phillip

Areas of Expertise

retired chemical engineer, how to recognize you are indoctrinated in religion, how to begin recovery from indoctrination in religion, understanding US founding fathers, each 1774 & 1787, becoming a human and member of living species

An idea worth spreading

Worldwide, people could think of themselves as human beings and members of the commuity of species--past present and future. Hence, consider common goals, e.g., justice, peace, defense, prosperity, preservation, and the privilege of liberty. Apply without self contradiction the platinum rule with the view that all species live together. Within this transcendent group, lead other associations we choose. For example, Americans could promote the Preamble to the United States Constitution with an annual holiday with celebrations that exceed the 4th of July. Emphasize the accomplishments and remaining work of We the People, as defined in the Preamble. If necessary for budget control, terminate one or two of the existing federal holidays. I suggest Labor Day hoiday become "We the People" holiday and Columbus day become "Constitution hoiday on successive days near September 17.

I'm passionate about

Appreciating people, their privacy, and their peace. Using plain intolerance to discourage violence, abuse, and imposition.

Talk to me about

Viewing social issues with open minds, as opposed to preserving preferences. The struggle to avoid 1) turning your back on reality and 2) self-contradiction.

People don't know I'm good at

Working to understand before forming an opinion and being ready to change on new information or better understanding of existing information. Accepting rejection--the other party may ignore you.

My TED story

Discovered TED by searching for other opinion about the meaning of We the People.

Comments & conversations

132079
Phillip Beaver
Posted almost 3 years ago
What are your essential requirements of humankind—what do you need to live in peace with your fellow humans?
Original Question: What are your essential requirements of humankind--with what provisions would you agree to be civically governed? Anticipating my eighth decade, I am one in 7 billion; a minnow in an ocean. Yet, I feel humankind includes me and needs me much like a hand needs its fingers (borrowing from Ralph Waldo Emerson). Neighbors and people in other countries make me feel important, but politicians do not. I see a diverse world. Humankind seems preoccupied by diverse nations. Yet, when I meet people in other nations, they seem like me. It seems to me we all want to live in peace as we see it, and each “as we see it,” does not seem as far apart as our nations seem to make us feel. I wonder if it is because we have no forum to share what we, individual humans, would like to receive from the rest of ourselves: humankind. Humankind’s wishes seem censored and warped by our political leaders. Also, often when people propose peace or unity, they invite the truth, faiths, reason, prosperity, conformity, and other objects that 7 billion people just cannot address. I invite thought about what it takes to live in confidence. I pared my most heartfelt needs and wants to share, and then to request Tedsters to do the same. My proposals are: Needed rest and sensible eating Exercise, talk, reading, and writing Use of most of my earnings and confidence my taxes are used for humankind, not an elite few Security to care for myself and loved ones Opportunities to meet with other humans who want to visit with me. Perhaps “security” is the broadest of my five concerns. It involves many issues, such as, the rule of written law, lawfulness as common as obeying traffic signals, freedom to contend with the unknowns of existence according to my preferences—no religious involvement in civic governance, ordinary protection of my home and property, medical care according to the risks I choose or take, environmental protection, and work opportunity according to my contributions.
132079
Phillip Beaver
Posted about 3 years ago
What are your essential requirements of humankind—what do you need to live in peace with your fellow humans?
Kristian, As you may know, I propose TED dialogues to learn, and I am always grateful when you contribute. I had never heard of Murray Rothbard, but want to read everything he wrote plus opponents’ positions, with the goal of becoming an activist for Libertarianism. I started with EGALITARIANISM AS A REVOLT AGAINST NATURE AND OTHER ESSAYS, second edition. After three essays. I am moved by this quote of the author: The basic reason for one's libertarianism should be a passion for justice, for sweeping away as quickly as possible the tyranny, the thievery, the mass murder, and enslavement, which Statism has, for too long, imposed upon mankind. It is only such a concern for justice that can inspire the Libertarian to try to abolish, as quickly as he can (and far from the Marxian sense), the exploitation of man by man. Murray N. Rothbard, 1974 It seems to me, he advocates both the rule of law and war only in self defense. More than anything else, he asserts that national regimes convince the people that other nations and therefore people in other nations are enemies. Thus, the State convinces the people to go to war for their personal interest, when really it is for the interest of the elite in the regime. I think Rothbard would encourage us humans to by-pass our national regimes to talk about what we want from each other. Phil
132079
Phillip Beaver
Posted about 3 years ago
What are your essential requirements of humankind—what do you need to live in peace with your fellow humans?
By "disagree" do you assert that the stronger the government the stronger the individual? It seems the stronger the government the wealthier the elite and the weaker the individual. Isn't economic viability a measure of geopolitical success? If so, it seems the world is in economic crisis. More importantly, what pared-down requirements would you propose in order to agree to be governed by the state?
132079
Phillip Beaver
Posted about 3 years ago
An international equivalent of “We the People” could provide goals toward peace for humankind.
Hello, Mark, and thank you for the inspiring response. I am curious as to why TED would not seem a good vehicle for the effort. It seems to me they would create a whole new branch if there was widespread interest. Perhaps at some point a TED manager will comment on that issue. Addressing your idea: My principle motivation is to act on my perception that most people just want to be free to live in peace and help find a way to achieve what should have been easy. Secondly, I want to learn what other people think of the seven goals used to define “We the People.” The idea, that We the People International could become a forum for communications with heads of governments, is excellent and yours. I will give some thought to trying to help your idea become reality. My first thought is to appeal to TED. As we have seen historically (especially in the actions of many leaders of governments) not everyone “is truly interested in betterment of mankind [and] will not let personal goals interfere with what is best for all.” This is the greatest challenge I see in carrying the ball with your suggestion. What if you fulfilled your idea? Back to We the People: I have pondered and written about “We the People” for some ten years and think it is so powerful that global attention to it would naturally change things. For example, if non-Americans started challenging America to follow a minority, We the People, Americans who strive to fulfill the seven goals, America might reform, and the world might benefit. Thank you for your ideas, and stay after me. I do want to make something happen.
132079
Phillip Beaver
Posted about 3 years ago
An international equivalent of “We the People” could provide goals toward peace for humankind.
Pat goes to the major realities: economics and education, not necessarily in order. Economic viability is challenging humankind. Many nations' greatest concern is to keep the people from panicking, yet the people are not educated to take responsibility for their governance. It seems to me the reason this is happening is that the individual, that basic element that comprises humankind has never imagined taking full responsibility for personal viability and governance. The individual cannot accomplish it without accommodating humankind. If education begins with understanding each country’s constitution or other guidelines for governance, the statement of goals that affect the people are staggeringly diverse. Many Americans do not even regard the Preamble to the US Constitution as the goals that the rest of the document would fulfill. It would be interesting to know the unofficial list of America’s goals as practiced. Consider Belgium’s goals stated as citizen’s rights: it seems the government is responsible for everything – even assuring a job. The task of understanding what each nation promises its citizens is formidable, but a team effort could produce results. I read that one leading educator claim that every child has a right to algebra, as though the government is solely responsible. I think economics has to be a major educational thrust. However, it seems to me each of the goals would need to be examined as to why it is there. I think the goals stated in the definition of “We the People” are prioritized, and the first two are unity and justice, respectively. Economic viability could be considered with each goal. Perhaps by examining each of the seven goals and struggling for mutual understanding, other needed goals might be identified and unneeded suggestions kept in documents for future understanding and reconsideration. Sorry I did not respond earlier and thank you.
132079
Phillip Beaver
Posted about 3 years ago
What is your motto in life?
Thank you for the question. I feel that a motto must be stated in context. Humankind seems comprised of individuals, who collectively advance understanding of nature, or reality, or what-is. Our share of some 6 trillion historical and current man-years is our brief life, perhaps 80 years. Before one’s life is over, will he/she conform to a factional cause or fulfill his/her potential to contribute to humankind? In this context, my motto is: develop the character to act; with kindness, humility, and focus.