Jason Hinchliffe

Managing Partner, J & A Group
Mississauga, Canada

About Jason

Bio

I'm really not that interesting.

Languages

English

Areas of Expertise

Winning

An idea worth spreading

There are two things you can do after you make a mistake - recognize it, or repeat it.

I'm passionate about

Probably a lot of the same things you are.

Universities

University of Toronto

Talk to me about

Pretty much anything. I'll either engage you, or bullshit well enough that we have appeared to communicate effectively.

People don't know I'm good at

Admitting when I'm wrong.

My TED story

Was referred here by a friend who is a very creative soul. It's quickly become a sick addiction. It strikes as the very core Schumpeter's dismissal of Marx's predictions. The "intellectual class" and the entrepreneurs will be responsible to destabilize the power of capital and prevent a collapse into central authority.

Comments & conversations

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Jason Hinchliffe
Posted over 1 year ago
Brian Greene: Is our universe the only universe?
I think you're missing the point of his talk. It's a crash in course in the what, not the why. If I care enough, the why is easy to search out. I don't need it spoon fed to me. Besides, if he were to seriously engage the topic technically, his talk would last weeks as he teaches 99 percent of the audience math so they can follow.
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Jason Hinchliffe
Posted almost 4 years ago
What are some ways to help youth in our communities?
Thank you for the kind words. Books that have been of use: Wealth of Nations - Adam Smith The Commuinist Manifesto - Duh Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy - Schumpeter (this should be read directly after the Communist Manifesto) These are books that coverr incredible findamentals. They may SEEM to be about money, industry etc. but in reality, they are examinations of human conditions from an extremely dispassionate viewpoint (except Marx, he's a bit fire and brimstone). Hagakure The Demon's Sermon on the Martial Arts The Book of 5 Rings These more or less cover what it means to not be a dickwad as an individual. A surprisingly difficult task for most. The Peloponnesian War - Donald Kagan The best example of how things don't change much. I invite anyone to compare Cleon's speech to many given Bush Jr. Hilarious and terrifying. This book more than anything shows the need for open and honest communication. Purple Cow - Seth Godin To be blunt, I already believed everything this book said before I read it. But this canonized it. I think it extends far beyond business and into thinking in general. A Clockwork Orange - Anthony Burgess Possibly the first real "game changer" of my life. Originally read when I was 14, and re-read a couple of times since. The freedom to choose, and the primacy of the individual are put front and center, and continued core values for me to this day. The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien What grander adventure is there? (I know I know it rhymes with Bored of the Stings). But as a child it sparked my imagination, and to this day I delight in the adventure of going "there and back again". There's more so many more. As for workshops, most involved a very successful business man teaching us how he made a miillion dollars by breaking the mold and being different. We all got very exceited and clapped and cheered then returned to our tightly controlled corporate environment where we betrayed what we learned and wondered why nothing changed.
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Jason Hinchliffe
Posted almost 4 years ago
Dream Neighborhood . . . do you live in one?
Actually Debra, it's not nearly that artistic. It's just reality. You'll find it all over the place. It's quite pervasive, that damned reality. I live in a middle class pocket between two neighborhoods known as "New Toronto" (pure ghetto) and "Port Credit" (very snazzy). As a result, we get the overflow from New Toronto coming into our area and plying their trade. Not pleasant, but occasionally it has some superb entertainment value.
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Jason Hinchliffe
Posted almost 4 years ago
What are some ways to help youth in our communities?
7. Are there any classes, workshops, books, etc that have had a huge impact on you? What are they? More than I can count, but none that would be useful to you I fear. (Too heavy/in depth). 9. Please feel free to share anything else you would like. Perhaps resources or ideas or talks that could be relevant? This is a free space to share what you please on the topic. Let kids be creative. Provide a pallete of options, let them naturally gravitate towards their interest, and create projects based on those interests.
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Jason Hinchliffe
Posted almost 4 years ago
What are some ways to help youth in our communities?
1. Did you have a teacher that inspired you? What did you learn most from him/her? I learned that education can be interesting. The perspective that it is fun to learn has shaped my life. 2. Is there any particular school project or assignment you had that sticks out in your mind? What was it? Game Design. We were tasked with designing either a puzzle or a game, I created an offshoot of Chinese Checkers using a fantasy theme (yes I was a geek). It stands out beause it was one of the few times I was able to be completely creative. 3. Knowing what you know now about the "real world", is there anything you wish school better prepared you for? Budgeting, accounting and other mundane stuff like that, that throws so many of us under the bus at a young age whenn we are financially inexperienced. 4. Do you love your work? If so, what inspired you toward that field? If not, what is it you would love to do if you could? I don't love my work, but it has it's upside. If I could do anything? Either a profesisonal fighter, or an archaeologist. Go figure. 5. If there are three pieces of wisdom or advice you could give to a kid, what would it be? If you are a current student what 3 pieces of wisdom or advice would you give adults? To a kid: 1. Others share the same feelings you do. You aren't different, and you have nothing to be ashamed of. 2. Losing is the best thing you can do. If you don't compete against people that can beat you, you'll never get better. 3. There are infinite possiblities. Learn from your experiences, but don't let them control you. There are always more options ahead. 6. If you could design a worshop or class for any age group you choose, which age group and what would you want to teach? Current students encouraged to answer this one too. Grade 5 and onwards. We would learn basic formal logic and critical reasoning.
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Jason Hinchliffe
Posted almost 4 years ago
Well Eric, clearly I can't know anyhting here, so this is all puure conjecture. This is my belief based purely on statistics. However, if I had to make a bet for my soul with the devil (see what I did there?), I'd bet we've been eclipsed many times over, and probably by a number of species that have already gone extinct. I definitely think it's well beyond a "possibility". I'd call it almost a statistical certainty.
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Jason Hinchliffe
Posted almost 4 years ago
How do smart people "find their level" in conversation?
Thomas, Atstra wrote "The foundation of education...". Therefore the questions in that context would be ones in which we are seeknig answers. Therefore my assertion stands. Obviously in a situation where there in attempt to solve a problem, this would be untrue, but frankly, I think it's pretty obvious that's outside of the scope of mmy comment. So I'm not sure what you're disagreeing with. Do you not feel in an educational environment, that is behooves students to try and figure things out for themselves first before asking?
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Jason Hinchliffe
Posted almost 4 years ago
BAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA...oh wow...Eric, that clip was gold. "It curves towards the mouth, has a non slip surface..." I thought for a moment he was discussing my pe...nevermind. Thank you , that was comic gold.
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Jason Hinchliffe
Posted almost 4 years ago
When you consider the amount of time that our Solar System has existed relative to the rest of the universe, and then us ourselves relative to our Solar System, it becomes pretty clear that we are newborns on the scale of higher reasoning sentient species.