Ana Sibrian

Boston, MA, United States

About Ana

Languages

French, Italian, Spanish

Comments & conversations

122596
Ana Sibrian
Posted about 3 years ago
Why is the mother-daughter relationship so marginalized within the media, education, and society?
I don't think the problem is the lack of representation of the mother-daughter relationship, in fact I think this phenomenon falls under the umbrella of the lack of representation of female-female relationships in the media in general. I feel like most films and TV shows only show how women relate to each other in relationship to the men in their lives, for example, two women with the same love interest. While there definitely is a lack of representation of female relationships, I do think in the past decade or so there has been an increase in shows and films that portray these relationships without men. Good examples are Sex and the City, Desperate Housewives, Bridesmaids, The Women (which actually doesn't show any male characters.) But of course that's just a handful, there's still a lot to improve!
122596
Ana Sibrian
Posted over 3 years ago
Should prostitution be illegal?
Thank you for sharing the first hand experience! I have heard before that legalizing prostitution actually increases a lot of the problems that criminalization addresses.
122596
Ana Sibrian
Posted over 3 years ago
Choosing the scientifically best language for international use?
Yeah I think you're right about the associations between signs and objects/actions. Definitely a point for sign language to becoming the international language. How do you feel about Esperanto? Do you think a construct like that is useful? I think it's not. I feel like language cannot be scientifically designated, but rather it develops organically. We're at a point where English has developed to be the most useful language internationally, and it works! English is (I think) very easy to learn, at least structurally. When learning a language what's important is not learning how to use the words, but rather who you are going to use it with. When learning a language, we also learn a vast amount of things unique to the culture the language is attributed to. So really what is important when learning a new language is how it is going to be used, and who it is going to be used for, as opposed to how easy it is to learn it. For example, if you are a French CEO trying to do business with Japan, learning their language (regardless of how hard it is) will help you connect to them culturally, and understand them better. Rather than trying to generalize as to what languages are best to learn, this is more of a personal choice, depending on context for each person. I am, however, biased because I am a language aficionado and am fascinated by learning new ones, making connections between them and how they relate to their culture.
122596
Ana Sibrian
Posted over 3 years ago
Would society benefit or suffer from volunteering replacing employment?
Ideally, yes, society would function better through a volunteer system. Capitalism (the current dominating system) and the personal accumulation of wealth lead to competitiveness which means that while some people climb up the ladder, others get left behind. In a system where people feel most rewarded by contributing to society, we'd need to live in a world where rather than competing to get ahead, everyone is running toward the same goal, and there are symbiotic relationships between everyone. Naturally these goals should be social justice, education, prosperity (for the community), etc. So the first step to move toward the kind of society where there is a strong sense of community is to alter the education system, or rather, educate people about the value of contributing to society as opposed to the importance of self-satisfaction. Essentially society needs to be weaned off the Capitalist mentality, slowly. Debra's idea about elderly people volunteering is another good way of making this transition. When becoming community centered as opposed to individually centered, however, one must ask: do the benefits of constructing a better society outweigh the freedom of choice that comes from an individualistic society? When bound to contribute to society one of two things can happen: a person is a functional member of the community, is self gratified knowing she is working toward the aforementioned noble common goals and society runs smoothly; on the other hand, there may be a sense that the obligation toward a bunch of strangers is not satisfying enough, and a person will lose drive to contribute. Again, it all goes back to mentality and ideology. The volunteer system is definitely better in theory, but I don't know how much it would work in practice.
122596
Ana Sibrian
Posted over 3 years ago
Are search engines reducing our capability to memorize?
The way people think has evolved together with technology. As Kriztian pointed out, there were the same issues when writing was introduced. And it's similar to how "people don't read anymore all they do is watch TV". There's actually a lot of extensive work done by Greg Ulmer about how the way we communicate has evolved throughout the ages, and he essentially addresses everything that is lost but also everything that is gained from this new technology. His book is called "Internet Invention: From Literacy to Electracy" He can be very convoluted in the way he expresses himself, probably because he's coming up with so many new words, but he does make some very interesting points! Essentially he thinks we have moved from orality to literacy, and now we're in a new stage called electracy, and it is the way we think through the internet.
122596
Ana Sibrian
Posted over 3 years ago
Should heterosexual women propose marriage or even broach the topic first or should they passively wait for the man to ask first?
I think heterosexual women should definitely propose, but I think there are a few challenges facing the brave couple that dares have the woman initiate marriage. Here's the problem with women proposing: when a man says "will you marry me?" he offers a ring, and it plays a central symbolic role in the engagement process. The engagement ring is such an important symbol in our capitalistic society (American or otherwise) that in order for both man and woman to be validated within their families/friends/etc, the gift of the ring is imperative. So if a woman proposes, the man may read this as "now you gotta buy me a ring", which is massively inconvenient for obvious reasons. On the other hand, looking at it from this capitalist/materialistic perspective that I'm proposing, the family of the bride pays for the wedding, so arguably it should be the woman's prerogative since the biggest expenditure is coming from her family's pocket. The ring, however, remains a much more important symbol in the ritual of the wedding than who paid for the reception, in fact the latter custom is rather outdated. I think this question is good because it reveals the subtle sexism that exist within really well established capitalistic traditions. In a society where the wedding and marriage do not revolve around materialism then I see no problems at all with women proposing. A short term solution for this problem? Engagement rings for men. How's that for a business idea? Also, I am using a western-centric, capitalistic perspective on this issue. I would love to hear how this question is answered from views around the world! What inherent cultural norms prevent or facilitate women to initiate marriage?