Ben Jin

Davis, CA, United States

About Ben

Bio

"I am 16, going on 17, I know that I'm naive"

Languages

Chinese, English

My TED story

I need some motivation.

Comments & conversations

122701
Ben Jin
Posted almost 4 years ago
Is giving Junk food to kids child abuse?
Uh weird, I guess we're not allowed to reply past the third reply? Well okay. Anyways so I guess you meant more the milk industries and transportation industries were phony, rather than the actual milk itself. Maybe we should go back to the ol' days of Laura Ingalls Wilder and milk our own cows again, eh? Haha, I'd like to see some of my neighbors own cows... but for the rest of us (again I'm not entirely sure of these facts), I always figured pasteurization was something necessary against spoilage, and if any harm is done from the process, it's just the destruction of certain nutrients. In the end, the pasteurized milk is probably healthier than a Pepsi still. As for homogenization... it's just like breaking down and re-suspending the fat, right? It'd be neat to see the studies that you wrote about, I'll try to find some online too. Hah. It's a Pokemon, Psyduck. Lots of mental power underneath, but it doesn't quite know how to use it yet...
122701
Ben Jin
Posted almost 4 years ago
Is giving Junk food to kids child abuse?
Yeah I realize your point. I mean, despite all the McDonald's commercials screaming healthy yogurt parfaits and whatnot, I'm pretty sure that the svelte people should avoid it... Also I realize that you're only using the milk example as just one of many exaggerations, but I thought that milk was actually pretty beneficial? Obviously it's not some miraculous panacea, but I know that its nutritional benefits are pretty decent, and that there are even arguments that humans originally evolved lactose intolerant, but those who were lactose persistent and could consume dairy products (such as milk) had higher life spans than those who were lactose intolerant and thus passed on good persistence genes. I've never done research on this so I don't know if this is fact, but it certainly sounds reasonable. I guess I still need that education I say the world needs ^_^ Um well, I'm old enough to realize I say too much and know too little, haha? That's entirely why I joined these conversations, of course. So hopefully my age doesn't show too terribly much.
122701
Ben Jin
Posted almost 4 years ago
Typically YOU did not choose your name. How does one's name affect their lives? Do you/have you ever wished for a different name? What? Why?
Libbey, thank you so much! I'm kinda new to this entire thing, so any sort of feedback is greatly appreciated, especially really heart-warming ones like yours. You're right in that I meant it in jest, but I guess maybe it wasn't exactly the most politically correct thing to say, haha... I guess honesty is still an integral element in these TED conversations, but I should probably try to phrase things better also, especially these sensitive topics that might be misconstrued. So thanks for that feedback a lot, and thanks for starting this interesting conversation! I love reading all the different comments.
122701
Ben Jin
Posted almost 4 years ago
Typically YOU did not choose your name. How does one's name affect their lives? Do you/have you ever wished for a different name? What? Why?
My name, Benjamin Jin, was chosen by my Chinese parents just a few years after they had moved to the United States from Taiwan. They chose the name "Benjamin" because of some positive blurb they read about the particular name in the baby book. And anyways, it doesn't sound that bad, right? Thus imagine my chagrin when I entered middle school and I, as well as many others, realized that my initials, "B.J.", stood for a certain explicit sexual act. Clearly my parents didn't know about this colloquial term, so they knew no wrong about calling me B.J. (and to this day, they still don't know!) Reasonably I really didn't like my name. It was just a source for ridicule and a kind of embarrassing... well, embarrassment. And I couldn't do anything to control it, because, well, it was middle school. Nobody can control a horde of hormonal teenagers with newly-raunchy-minds. If anything, though, now I wear my name like a badge rather than a liability. No, not because I'm the school prostitute, but just because it's funny and it's something that catches people's eyes. Nobody judges by your names nowadays (unless it's REALLY bad), but letting them realize your name is B.J. is something that kinda... opens them up to you. It almost helps to make me more approachable, in a way. I watch comedians on T.V. and they all seem to unanimously agree in that they must have jokes where they make fun of THEMSELVES. After all, someone who can't roll with the punches is just a wimp, right? Seeing this name on me, a normal, everyday guy, theoretically makes people think I can take a joke, which is a good first impression. So I guess in a weird twisted way, I do kind of thank my parents for giving me this... unfortunate... name. Heh. We can all learn from bad things, I guess that's what I want to say. But we should be proud of our names! Symbolically they are who we are. From "Bill" to "MacGhilleseatheanaich," we should be proud of what our parents gave us!
122701
Ben Jin
Posted almost 4 years ago
If the world shared a common language, would religion be obsolete?
I don't know if this is right or not, but isn't this the hippie ideal? Reject branches of religion, and then just basically embrace those core values of human emotion and mind... I'm also unsure as to whether the hippie idealism is really "institutionalized", but I know of a fable by Lincoln Steffens, quoted here from Huston Smith's book "The World's Religions": "Lincoln Steffens has a fable of a man who climbed to the top of a mountain and, standing on tiptoe, seized hold of the Truth. Satan, suspecting mischief from this upstart, had directed on of his underlings to tail him; but when the demon reported with alarm the man's success - that he has seized hold of the Truth - Satan was unperturbed. 'Don't worry,' he yawned. 'I'll tempt him to institutionalize it.'" Har har har. I'm not trying to discourage churches or the establishment of religions at all, but it just SEEMS that institutionalization, or that "love to label, categorize, and give everything names" for religions, as you put it, doesn't always go the way we intend. Without a doubt, ideally, a common language of "love, transformation, peace, and acceptance" sounds tantalizing, but if the world did suddenly follow these ideals, someone, somewhere is gonna start twisting the format out of concept and we'll be stuck in the same position we were before. When it gets to ideals, religions similarly sound just so tantalizing; even the caste system of India sounded pretty decent until it was actually put into effect. Maybe some variety of religions, where we all learn to coexist peacefully, is really where we can learn about peace and acceptance, rather than just one common language and total absence of the number of religions we have today. Acceptance for new things won't exist if foreign things don't exist in the first place.
122701
Ben Jin
Posted almost 4 years ago
If you could teach the world 1 valuable thing you learned, what would it be and why?
Don't touch the hot metal surfaces!!! Just kidding. But biologically and especially in today's world when we're surrounded by screaming tea kettles and soldering irons and stove tops, it's pretty important to learn that "once bitten, twice shy" kind of concept. Anyways, I would have to say that it's important to consider all sides of some topic before making opinions. I mean, we're all making opinions everyday about everything, and to develop a worldly view, we shouldn't jump to conclusions; rather we ought to at least TRY to retain a non-biased initial mindset, and then adapt to opinion we feel is the best only after considering all other possibilities. I'm sure that without this skill, TED conversations would soon become bloody brawls of diatribe and bigotry...
122701
Ben Jin
Posted almost 4 years ago
Is giving Junk food to kids child abuse?
Being a child that loves junk food... I can't really say that the occasional bag of potato chips or carton is ice cream is really as serious as "child abuse." Giving Mickey D's and Wendy's every night to our children is definitely leading them onto obesity or diabetes or heart disease or any host of good ol' American diseases and could perhaps arguably be deemed child abuse...? but I believe that as long as we educate our children properly about the potential harms of junk foods and give them reasonable amounts while still maintaining a healthy diet, it's all right. Education, right? It's what we all need, and I'm sure that I've heard "THE WORLD NEEDS TO BE EDUCATED" screamed numerous times on TED Talks. The world surrounding us is full of temptations to do this and that, but as long as the we are educated well upon the truth of things, that's a good start. I guess that's the reason for the required health classes in school, the nutritional and ingredient lists on all food products, etc...