Sharon Hawkes

Lenox, MA, United States

Someone is shy

Sharon hasn't completed a profile. Should we look for some other people?

Comments & conversations

Noface
Sharon Hawkes
Posted over 2 years ago
Leslie Morgan Steiner: Why domestic violence victims don't leave
When she spoke about telling everyone, first on her list was the police. So she did use the justice system. Taru, I couldn't disagree more with the saying that "people who take abuse are as guilty as people who deliver it." No one deserves to be abused, and certainly not those who wanted to be kind, understanding, and helpful.
Noface
Sharon Hawkes
Posted over 2 years ago
Leslie Morgan Steiner: Why domestic violence victims don't leave
I agree with Valentin. It is the degree of infatuation that is a tip-off that something is wrong, and that something may wind up as domestic violence. Another early warning sign was that he made a major lifestyle decision (quitting the "dream job") without discussing it with her first. Perhaps if we can teach our children that such red flags should automatically make them postpone any major lifestyle decisions of their own for at least 6 months (combining checking accounts, moving in together, getting married), that perhaps then a few more red flags will be revealed. I also thought it was interesting that the abuser went back over and over to blame his childhood for his extreme behaviors, knowing it was an excuse that she would accept.
Noface
Sharon Hawkes
Posted over 2 years ago
Leslie Morgan Steiner: Why domestic violence victims don't leave
I agree with Valentin. It is the degree of infatuation that is a tip-off that something is wrong, and that something may wind up as domestic violence. Another early warning sign was that he made a major lifestyle decision (quitting the "dream job") without discussing it with her first. Perhaps if we can teach our children that such red flags should automatically make them postpone any major lifestyle decisions of their own for at least 6 months (combining checking accounts, moving in together, getting married), that perhaps them a few more red flags will be revealed. I also thought it was interesting that the abuser went back over and over to blame his childhood for his extreme behaviors, knowing it was an excuse that she would accept. Because in the end, one of the reasons victims are fooled is that abusers are good at deceiving. They even deceive themselves.
Noface
Sharon Hawkes
Posted over 3 years ago
In your opinion, what should the purpose of education be?
I loved Deb Burks' definition below, that the goal of education is to challenge each learner to maximize individual potential. The world is rapidly changing, and it is not enough to equip students to use the tools that are out there now. For example, I know of ex-mill workers who had assumed the mill would provide a decent living for them, until the mill closed and they were left adrift. Many future citizens will need to be able to create their jobs, not just join someone else's company. So when it comes to core competencies, I would include the ability to communicate (arts and humanities), measure (math and sciences), analyze, plan, research, collaborate, and maintain health. And the seeds should be planted that learning is lifelong.
Noface
Sharon Hawkes
Posted about 4 years ago
"WHY is the patient the most under-used resource in healthcare?? How did that happen?" (Follow-up to LIVE TED Conversation July 27)
I think (and others have written) that science and technology have slowly been replacing medical opinion. Talking to the patient can be a nebulous business. Patients might be cranky or spacey, because they're sick. They might be imprecise, or shy, or mentally impaired, or not fluent in English. They can have coinfections or comorbidities that hamper diagnosis. They might have beliefs about medical care that conflict with the practitioner. Medicine would be great if there weren't patients in it! :) I think it is also important to mention the risk of medical malpractice lawsuits as a factor in clinicians preferring test results to patients. Technology is a second opinion, science backing up the clinician's diagnosis. Tests are positive or negative -- yes, no. Nothing nebulous about it. (Never mind that tests can be wrong quite often.) You can't sue me for missing your ulcer, the H. pylori test was negative. Blame the test, blame the technician. Yes, it's culture. Yes, it's mentoring. And yes, the more we vote with our feet (I have recently "fired" a new PCP because of the impersonal way in which my first appointment was handled), and block the door (LOVED that story), and the more we insist on a partnership with our clinicians, the more we will contribute to returning the art of medicine back to its science.
Noface
Sharon Hawkes
Posted about 4 years ago
"WHY is the patient the most under-used resource in healthcare?? How did that happen?" (Follow-up to LIVE TED Conversation July 27)
I agree that patients don't always prepare their information, and don't always speak up. But clinicians don't always listen, and don't make time or room for the patient to ask when the patient is ready. For example, a serious diagnosis is usually greeted with shock by the patient, and questions are only formulated much later. Is there a handout from the doctor, including written information summarizing the condition, treatment options, prognosis, and resources for help? In the hospital setting, one of the best resources for this is the medical librarian. Some forward-thinking hospitals are including their librarians in the team, as they can follow up with print information, websites, support groups, etc. when the patient is ready.
Noface
Sharon Hawkes
Posted about 4 years ago
"WHY is the patient the most under-used resource in healthcare?? How did that happen?" (Follow-up to LIVE TED Conversation July 27)
I believe that the patient has become the most under-used resource in healthcare because doctors have stopped listening to us. The reasons are many, but include: increased reliance on technology, reliance on the insurance companies to slot diagnoses into easy answers, brevity of appointment time, no years-long clinician-patient relationship, and the diagnostician's own reticence to say, "I don't know, but I will take responsibility to help you." Dr. Richard J. Baron said in An Introduction to Medical Phenomenology: I Can't Hear You When I'm Listening, "We must learn to hear our patients as well as their breath sounds; after all, what are we listening for?" The patient's own testimony is supposed to be part of evidence-based medicine, and when you put together multitudes of similar, independent testimonies, you have a powerful evidence base that should not be denied. Sadly, when patients aren't being listened to, we lose their clues to the cause and cure of their illnesses, and we lose what it is to care.