Stevan S.

Belgrade, Serbia, Serbia

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Stevan S.
Posted over 1 year ago
If the cure for mortality is found within your lifetime, would you go for it and become immortal?
Gerald, Like the intro argumentation, well rounded, really pleasant stuff to read. How would being immortal affect an individual's psyche? NOT being confounded by the frames of time would, perhaps, wither one's will to accomplish life-long goals. It might be more important to get the timings right than to forever be aware that "things can wait". I guess an immortal would have to have some Highlander-like goals to justify himself, to himself. Ending an immortal lifespan would always have to be horribly unnatural and sad thing, since I disagree with quote OP "Dying at age 80 is no more a "natural" death than being eaten alive by a bear or killed by malaria. In fact, "old age" is probably the most unnatural cause of death, statistically." /quote. Humane medical sciences would back me up here. Though, I admit, it would be pretty fascinating to find out how would the "injection" work, scientifically.
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Stevan S.
Posted over 1 year ago
study of the molecular and physiological aspects of the tree leaves that are located at the highest hight
Are you sure plant cells are immune to damage caused by UV light? If that is the case, I would assume that the explanation for that would be form a of a photo-sensitive DNA repair mechanism. Bacteria posses that system which is activated by mere sunlight, allowing them to repair DNA mutations. Human cells do not posses this system of repair. I can't see how does the chemical structure of the plant cell wall prevent UV damage, care to discuss?
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Stevan S.
Posted over 1 year ago
The Internet: Has it made us more or less social?
Indeed, and it might negatively effect one's personality development, in a sense that "the membrane" allows individuals "run away" instead of dealing with their insecurities. Also, mozda gresim, ali ljudi sa nasih prostora relativna retkost na ovom forumu, iz nekog razloga... Moderatoru se nece svidjati ovaj kligonski jezik kojim pricamo :D
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Stevan S.
Posted over 1 year ago
The Internet: Has it made us more or less social?
Internet is supposed to make us interconnect. But is that always the primary agenda? For example, Facebook: I sometimes feel that Facebook has become a platform for self-marketing, rather than socializing- people create a virtual avatar (or membrane?) to promote themselves in the best possible light, which reveals an interesting primordial human trait: vanity. Also, pozdrav :-)
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Stevan S.
Posted almost 2 years ago
How can newspapers survive the web
The discussion concerning ecology is certainly well-placed. However, there is another dimension to the problem. How will the death of traditional newspapers affect the quality of journalism? The presence of social media allows us to have somewhat accurate, brief information immediately, on the spot, as it happened, from the people that are "there". And in the modern age where time is a luxury, that is everything an average reader needs: a tweet, a status. Everyone wants the breaking story shortened and, most importantly, for free. A detailed analysis of a subject in a quality traditional paper is something people don't have time for. Therefore, they will not buy such newspapers. Hence, the newspaper will not be able to pay the authors of such analyses and all of this might lead to an extinction of serious journalism. Which is a problem.
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Stevan S.
Posted almost 2 years ago
Should the neuronal environment of the brain be genetically modified to treat some forms of neurodegeneration?
Microglia are macrophages of the central nervous system. They can (and physiologically DO) "eat" entire neurons (if they are non-functioning). However, I can't see how can they eliminate plaques located INSIDE the neuron without engulfing and removing the entire neuron. Specifically manipulating the genome microgila cells is theoretically possible, though I can't see how would it help the plaque-infested neurons for the reason stated above.
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Stevan S.
Posted almost 2 years ago
Why is it that classical music is now ignored by the majority of society?
I agree that the level of appreciation of classical music might co-enside with the level of musical education. However, I also feel that the level of maturity is an important factor. Children are forced to take in certain pieces of classical music which they couldn't possibly truly comprehend at their age. Own example: I was thought to play Bach and, as a kid, found it really boring. As the years passed and my appreciation of music in general grew, I finally came to understand what a genius he was. I would propose that elementary music education should start with the easy, popular stuff. After mastering such music, one could realize why is classical music considered the to be amazing.
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Stevan S.
Posted almost 2 years ago
Why is it that classical music is now ignored by the majority of society?
Are you certain classical music wasn't "ignored" in the period spanning 16th-20th century? This is the period during which classical music was popular, according to popular belief. In order to clarify my question, consider the following. Classical music was never the "popular" genre. I suggest that, perhaps, it's the sheer quality of the music that enabled it to survive the ages, being analyzed again and again by people that are in love with music, while the "pop" music of a certain age simply didn't pass the test of time. By quality, I refer to the sheer geniousness, creativity, skill and knowledge that springs from the classical pieces.