Ivaylo Sotirov

freelance artist

About Ivaylo

Languages

Bulgarian, English

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

118641
Ivaylo Sotirov
Posted almost 4 years ago
What do you think is the main reason why contemporary kids do not like / understand opera?
Speaking for myself - No I don't like Opera! Never did. Not only as a music, but also as a story telling media. I've been to a few of the big named Operas in London, and never liked them much beyond the "going to a high class event in a fancy suit" feel they give you :) Personally I think as a story telling medium the classic Opera is desperately archaic! We're probably the most narratively proficient society that has ever existed on this planet! From big budget movies to televised series, HBOs and sitcoms, graphic novels, independent youtube movies, animations, musicals, video games, the paperback novel etc. etc. I'm not saying that Opera has no place in modernity, all I'm saying is that's not surprising if it survives on the fringes of the modern world. Because once you strip the narrative value all you got left is some fancy singing, and if you don't happen to like that very particular type of singing style then the media of the Opera becomes void of all potential value for you.
118641
Ivaylo Sotirov
Posted almost 4 years ago
Edward Tenner: Unintended consequences
I completely disagree I loved every moment of the talk. Though I do have a historicism bias :) But no, I was very impressed with the structure, I'm definitely ordering one of his books to see what else he has to say.
118641
Ivaylo Sotirov
Posted almost 4 years ago
What's your TED habit?
TED is always bookmarked on my browser, but I must say I don't visit much often. Once or twice a month as you said I "gorge " on content :) I'm mainly here to hunt for interesting TED speakers who have written good books, I could suck my teeth into. It's from TED that I found out about Dan Ariely, Steven Levitt, Jared Diamond, Michael Shermer and Malcolm Gladwell. And most recently Michael Specter and his book Denialism :) TED is my resource for finding good books on varying subjects I guess :D
118641
Ivaylo Sotirov
Posted almost 4 years ago
Instead of making life try to keep your own life!. Why materialistic science will always fail to explain life and death ??
Wow, AbdelRahman Sidding this is the worst written comment I've seen on this website so far :( Grammar aside, what you're asserting is a very narrow scriptural assessment of things. 1st - Science, does not exclude the existence of a soul out of spite to the Abraham religions and it is not a even remotely a matter of believe or disbelieve. Sciences like biology and psychology etc. do not fit a notion of a soul because there are no evidence for it's existence. I'm not saying there's no soul, what I'm saying is that the observable World does not necessitate the need for a a soul. Those sciences can make accurate and valid predictions without fitting in the notions of a soul which therefore exclude the validity of it's requirement in the first place. 2nd - The notion of a soul is purely a Mediterranean invention which can not be seen in any similar form anywhere outside of the ancient Mediterranean religions and the Greek philosophies. That right there comes to show that the soul is not even an universal concept let along can it be viewed as the universal truth of things in the manner that you're describing it. I'm not trying to attack you, or your religious beliefs far from it, instead I'm trying to point out the dangers of the literal scriptural interpretation that you're asserting. There are many different ways to look at the world and many different cultures that exist and have existed, each with their own unique views and interpretations, all equally valid to those born and raised in them. And they are all beautiful and equally unique, don't shut yourself from them and their beauty, they can only enrich you and can not in any way lessen the beliefs you hold dear, but instead can only open your eyes for broader interpretations and inclusiveness to others.
118641
Ivaylo Sotirov
Posted about 4 years ago
How real is the influence of politics on the economy?
Depends on the country. Free market economies are based on an economic practice where the government has minimal influence and the free market balances itself out. Controlled markets in which the state directly governs goods, services and labor. In both cases they are symbiotic but one has more sway over the other. In the free market economy corporations and labor leagues potentially have more influence on directing the administration while in a controlled market they would have much less. But ultimately it’s in the hand of the government to create and decide the laws by which those markets would operate by. And it is the government that decides what type of economy you’ll have.
118641
Ivaylo Sotirov
Posted about 4 years ago
Is 'sharing TED talks" just another form of evangelism?
I think it might be similar because people essentially are similar. No matter if you are religious, agnostic, atheist, naturalist, new age, whatever, when we see something we identify with deeply I think most of us will act similarly in the ways we would try to attract others to identify with what we appreciated. So people who believe in something and are emotional about it will act in the same manner, no matter what the subject – a TED talk. And the majority of the TED talks I think would be worth spreading because they would encourage the scientific method and it is the best and most beneficial body of techniques we’ve come up with to approach the world with. While religious factions will only encourage themselves with bodies of techniques designed to disregard others and ascertain only their views – often with holy texts that you’re not allowed to scrutinize. One encourages inquiry and curiosity while the other encourages devotion, I think one clearly stands better but many will disagree on which one.
118641
Ivaylo Sotirov
Posted about 4 years ago
Is it possible to be simultaneously rational and religious?
Yes, the same way that being Atheist or Agnostic doesn’t make you immoral, being religious does not make you inherently irrational, incapable or stupid! I wish this prosecution perpetually instigated by both sides could stop. I can find beauty and reason in religions from all over the world, without believing in any, as I’m sure many followers of religions see the benefits of the scientific method of understanding without having it compromising their beliefs. When would we stop feeling ourselves attacked by the other side simply because they are different as if that somehow undermines who we are? Atheist fundamentalists are just as bad as religious fundamentalists. And fundamentalism is something to be afraid of no matter which side it’s coming from. If we don’t put an end to this, the problems would keep exasperating and will ultimately spiral out of control. And we all know what events this could lead to we don’t need to look much far in history to see what happens when differences cannot be put aside!
118641
Ivaylo Sotirov
Posted about 4 years ago
Bill Joy: What I'm worried about, what I'm excited about
We need to stop electing politicians, but instead elect scientists, historians etc. in high-government positions. Basically anyone who is trained in the scientific method and logical, non-linear thinking is a much better fit than someone who's been trained to be charming on camera. I don’t want to bash and generalize all politicians because many do wonderful work, but many also are a shining example of how disorganized and unable to foresee logical correlations governments have become. Are bureaucrats and politicians best fit to run countries? What I really want to see is the philosopher king approach of Plato but applied to democracy with all high-government positions run by academics.
118641
Ivaylo Sotirov
Posted about 4 years ago
Steve Keil: A manifesto for play, for Bulgaria and beyond
I think Steve has a good understanding of the way the corporate establishments in Bulgaria functions, obviously working in that area. These corporate businesses I bet really are very rigid and I would mostly explain (but not defend) them with being a very recent presence in our country. Only two decades ago that business environment did not exist at all. And as any developing nation I think people approach working for this new and fast emerging corporate world with the sort of overwhelming reverence and understanding that this is something new and important and ultimately greatly contributing to our economy. As you said we only just emerged from communism. Our democracy is not much older than me. So it’s no surprise that people falling under that great pressure are reverting back to the old and rigid system of rules and regulations in their desire to ultimately succeed in this endeavor. And as an outsider I believe you do have a greater view on the situation than most of your peers, and your call for revolution might be indeed very beneficial to this specific sector of our society. However… and I hate that part because I really did enjoy your lecture, I disagree on its generalizations. My observations of growing up in the country are that this rigidness you talked about is existent in only a small fraction of social life (mainly the government sector and large business establishments) and in general has been replaced by its polar opposite and not in a beneficial way. As Tita Dimitrova pointed out perhaps “we play too much.” a view that is shared by others in the comment sections from neighboring countries that have also went through communism and are experiencing largely the same social issues. I just don’t think that blaming the “baba” upbringing and our communist past does enough justice in explaining the difficulties we are experiencing as a society in modern day world. I did however enjoy your talk and I hope you have positive impact on the work that you do.