Siuling Ding

Guang Zhou, China

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Comments & conversations

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Siuling Ding
Posted about 4 years ago
Why do we engage in superstition?
I think the fact that we have so much resources can work to promote superstition, like Luck. For example we receive so much information and we see/hear so many ways to get hurt or get in trouble, it's not surprising that some of the information spring to mind when you see a ladder in your path, and choose to walk around it. Mind you that some places or the world are still miles behind in terms of technology and people who live there are unaware of the newest breakthroughs in many fields, and this effect will amplify over time. For example some people still have no idea how planets came to be, so that community might turn to something else. - Ding
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Siuling Ding
Posted about 4 years ago
Who are you? Defined by your genetics and created by your human experience
There are 2 answers to this question for me: On the grand scale I'm just a very small part of the universe's machine to converge energy and intellegence, just like everything else that is alive. On another level I'm just the person that I and only I know. It is said that you're preceived by everyone differently and it is never possible for someone else to know as much about yourself than you. Since you are the one defines, or by the standards of our society responsible for defining through speech and actions, who you are, you are really quite lonely in your own worlds which no body fully understands. In terms of genetics and other scientific methods of determining who you are, I think eventually we'll find out that we're all very similar. It's not rocket science that we're all descendants of some single cell organism. Look in this direction you may but I suspect very little you will find about who you are. - Ding
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Siuling Ding
Posted about 4 years ago
can Evolution explain why all species are happened in pair (male & female)?
There's a book that explains this, it's called "13 things that don't make sense" by Michael Brooks. So I guess none of us will be able to explain it if it's among the most puzzling quests of our time. It has something to do with evolution I clearly recall, as to why I remember it being the less efficient way to reproduce, hense the non-sense. - Ding
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Siuling Ding
Posted about 4 years ago
Is the generation in education getting less intelligent than the ones before them or smarter?
I have to disagree on the 'kids don't need to think' part and here's my reasons: I don't think it would be any more necessary to think even if we put away all the make-easy machines, because these machines aren't designed to think for us, they're designed to make things happen quicker. People all need to talk to friends, I can do it in less than 1 minute while it may take someone a few weeks 300 years ago. Think of technology like this: when we have a higher order of problem to deal with, we group the per-requisites and automate it so we can solve the same/similar problem again a lot quicker, i.e. calculator helps scientists solve complicated maths, MSN helps people at work to communicate, etc... I don't think people are lazier nowadays, in fact I believe the opposite. The people who are leading the development of mankind are doing more in less time. - Ding
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Siuling Ding
Posted about 4 years ago
Why does music "touch" us emotionally? It doesn't make sense.
Music has rythm, many of the components of our biological body also do, like the cells that govern the rate of our heartbeat. So there may be some kind of harmony going on here. These biological rythms inside us helps us notice patterns in the world around us, I would say music is a massive collection of patterns that stand out to us from the rest of the sounds we hear. As to feelings being triggered by music, I can only say that some people are more sensitive to certain types of information than others. - Ding
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Siuling Ding
Posted about 4 years ago
Why does the diffusion of innovation take so long?
Kurzweil's theory does not suggest that we mannually increase the pace of development, he's simply stating that the speed of technology/biological evolution has been increasing, no one seems to find evidence that this will stop, so he proposes that this will continue to happen. I think, we can possibly surpress this evolution but technology will unlock so much possibility it will be hard to resist, so many people will choose to adapt. After this point, it works very similar to natrual selection, if the adaptation proves more potent, these people will secure a higher chance of survival, the resisting group will become smaller and smaller, eventually be filtered out. - Ding
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Siuling Ding
Posted about 4 years ago
Why does the diffusion of innovation take so long?
The real question is do we really want to speed up the diffusion of innovation... For people who always want to experience the frontline of technology innovation, nothing is stopping them. To shift from traditional light to LED light may seem a small step but actually it is a huge undertaking. To replace all the lightbulbs on the market in a short period of time is a burst action and such actions are almost never good on a macro scale. Yes we're interested in engergy efficient products, but we also want predictable pace of progress. - Ding
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Siuling Ding
Posted about 4 years ago
Is the generation in education getting less intelligent than the ones before them or smarter?
I think the word "intelligent" is changing very rapidly. Don't you think it's a waste of time that every generation has to spend the first 20 years learning the same knowledge? And that it's almost like a race to find out who's quicker (current definition of intelligent)? I think education will change drastically, hopefully to one that involves a system that stores all the known knowledge of human history, and more importantly, an interface with which we can access this knowledge base. In this future period, our time and efforts will be dedicated entirely to solve problems, not learning how to. - Ding
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Siuling Ding
Posted about 4 years ago
Do you believe we have true freewill?
Lol just realised that I didn't even answer the questions.No, I do not think we're more than chemical and physical reactions. I think one day we will be smart enough to fully understand ourselves, and only then will we be able to fully explain our existence, and that explaination will be a long list of facts and rules, similar to how we describe other things we understand today.- Ding
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Siuling Ding
Posted about 4 years ago
Do you believe we have true freewill?
I am still confused regarding the answer to this question. Yes it appears that we have the ability to act without any restriction, but the actions are limited to my, or your, 'self'. i.e. I can raise my hand at anytime but not anyone else's. As technology advances, 'self' will begin to include things other than our biological bodies. But experiments show that the brain activities behind raising my arm begins even before I decide to carry out the action, so from this perspective the action is, somehow, not a result of my concious thinking. My views are heavily base on scientific facts and experiments but I'm glad to see opinions with different groundings. - Ding