Gerry Phibbs

Glendale, CA, United States

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16148
Gerry Phibbs
Posted almost 3 years ago
Jeremy Gilley: One day of peace
To Mr. Jeremy Gilley I say thank you. Your TED talk is certainly inspiring, and a profound witness to your own personal commitment. Yours is a message of hope, as much as it is about peace. In today's world, it seems that both hope and peace are in very short supply. Here in the United States, as the anniversary of 9/11 is so much on our minds and in our media, I believe that your simple message needs to be heard as well. If only there were some sort of an "equal time" requirement, that would allow your message to be broadcast along with all the diatribes and commemoration. Still, now that it has been shared via this TED talk, at the very least I can hope it shall find a larger audience. For all those who seem so eager to deny this message, to categorize it as too simplistic, or naive, or unworkable - I feel that I just have to ask. What the hell is the matter with you? Are you so totally wrapped up in your cynicism, in your negativity, that you feel compelled to deny this simple truth? You've got to have some sort of weird justification going on inside your own philosophies, to hold out that since it can't bring total and complete peace, you don't want any of it? Amazing how the culture of violence has so skewed so-called enlightened thinking! Peace is not the absence of conflict, nor simply the cessation of violence. Peace is the presence of justice. Yet it has to have a beginning somewhere. If by stopping the violence even for one day, will allow people to receive medical treatments, distribute aid, and most importantly continue the dialogue about stopping the violence permanently, then I say bring that day forth! It's that ongoing dialogue, that desire, that hope that peace can be made to happen, that shall one day forge peace from the complexity of issues and injustice that have been expressed for far too long. Jeremy Gilley - Peace!
16148
Gerry Phibbs
Posted almost 3 years ago
Svante Pääbo: DNA clues to our inner neanderthal
Fascinating research Dr. Svante Paabo! I'm glad to see this kind of hard scientific exploration focused on our own evolutionary path. Your research seems to support a very blended family tree, which blurs the distinctions between those of us living now, and our ancestors. This is very encouraging, in as much as it appears to show that those "surface" differences didn't seem to matter all that much to our ancestors, and thus shouldn't really mean all that much to us now. Thank you!
16148
Gerry Phibbs
Posted almost 3 years ago
Eve Ensler: Suddenly, my body
Ms Ensler, There are lots of words on display here. Words of support, of criticism, of inquiry, and of sadness.. and all seem to fit somehow. But as I watched your talk, it was the emotion, the rage, the pain, the yawlp of your own realizations. This sort of public display of such energy.. somehow reaches deep inside my own self.. as if magnetically attracted.. it tugs and pulls.. demands my own to rise up.. swell and pulse.. and remind me just how connected we all are by the inner energies that need no translation. I humbly thank you..
16148
Gerry Phibbs
Posted about 3 years ago
JD Schramm: Break the silence for suicide attempt survivors
John, thank you for daring to witness to your own story. There's a universal gut level tug that can't be ignored. I know depression, the darkness that envelopes all of your being, and the soul felt desire that it all just stop. I have not attempted to end it - to some degree because of the supportive sharing of others like yourself, who manage to find their own ways to deal with it, and overcome that whispered wish. Talking about it may be a means to intellectually begin the process, but I'll say it here, that just being quiet for the few minutes of your talk, to just listen and bear witness to your candor, certainly has offered at least as much therapy. Thank you sir!
16148
Gerry Phibbs
Posted over 3 years ago
How does the presenter impact the reaction to a talk? So how might people's reactions to my talk be different if I was retired military?
Professor Richards.. perhaps both of these negative perceptions stem from some sort of internal or group "posturing" - in the first, to deliberately position oneself into the "us" or the "USa" group, with the second possibly being more of an internal posture, assuring themselves that their own personal level of empathy is like that third bowl of porridge.. "just right"? In my time, I've found the hardest concept to accept, is that there is far more to an issue than I'd considered, that I might possibly be wrong in my understanding, or wanting in my thinking processes.
16148
Gerry Phibbs
Posted over 3 years ago
Sam Richards: A radical experiment in empathy
Professor Richards, I thank you for your talk. I think that within the confines of so many things, the university auditorium, the ages of your students, the wider audience of the TED community, you did a great job! Your talk quickly became "uncomfortable" as you described the reversed situations. In many ways, in order to learn something, one needs to get uncomfortable in some fashion. Your talk doesn't quite fit the normal "feel good" modality of so many TED talks - and I congratulate you for that! As impossible as it is to really "walk a mile" in another's shoes, your talk dared to begin such a journey, and that's a great credit to you, and to the programs that foster and support this kind of dialogue. Certainly it's not a popular position, nor an easy journey for anyone, especially those in the US who prefer to swallow the populist pap that passes for current political and social dialogue. More power to you sir! If only a few are able to pause in their daily lives for moment and think.. "hey.. if that were me, what *might* I feel about that?" then your success will continue to bear fruit. Peace
16148
Gerry Phibbs
Posted over 3 years ago
Harvey Fineberg: Are we ready for neo-evolution?
This is a remarkable talk, and I really hope that over time, I will be able to further contemplate and understand the inferences of Dr. Fineberg's position. As I consider it, I'm not sure that some of the negative concerns about these realities are all that new or well thought out. At least in relatively recent human history, it has been our technology that has already granted many of us better health, better memory, more physical strength and endurance, and so forth. Better nutrition alone surely has made tremendous changes in our current biology. Said nutrition is also the result of willful and active choices than our ancestors could have hoped for, and few (I hope) would propose to remove those options, in an effort to remain "true" to their understanding of the evolutionary process. But now, and in the near future it seems that we'll have the potential for our biology to be enhanced even further by our technologies. This seems to take some of that old "selective breeding" nastiness out of the equation, although it can be argued that pretty much all breeding in the human population is selective on many levels. Of course, who can rationally argue against offering better health, greater intellects, and thus more "success" to our next generations? Every parent wants their child to be better suited to their changing world. It would seem that at least some of the associated issues fall to those possibly outside the science fields, to debate and argue. I too hope that genuine wisdom and understanding is part of this discussion. I also wonder whether in the long run, nature itself might not make the final decisions. There are always side effects and drawbacks that manifest years later. One example might be the 1918 influenza pandemic has been linked to some later in life illness. Would it be reasonable now to accept greater physical prowess in youth, to be offset by greater risk of dementia in later life? Each will have to discover our own answers.