Lars Jan

Artistic Director / Founder, Early Morning Opera
Los Angeles, CA, United States

About Lars

Bio

LARS JAN is a director, designer, writer, and media artist. He is the artistic director of Early Morning Opera, a multi-disciplinary art lab based in Los Angeles that specializes in live performance. Lars has made genre-bending artworks about TED talks, suicide bombers, Laika the Soviet space dog, land art, a downed fighter pilot, and the impossibility of outsiders ever knowing the relationship that two people have together. He has created an image-ballet with two Steadicam operators, choreographed seven women in burqas, and wrangled one giant panda with iPads for paws. Lars studied Bunraku-style puppetry outside Kyoto for a year and taught physical performance at Kabul University's fledgling theatre department. As a Princeton Atelier Fellow, he recorded elder women in rural Ukraine singing in a vanishing polyphonic style. His original performance and installation works have been seen at The Whitney Museum of American Art (NYC), Sundance Film Festival (UT), Symphony Space (NYC), PianoSpheres (LA), REDCAT (LA), The Kirk Douglas Theatre (LA), and The Philadelphia Live Arts Festival. Recently he has created new work while a resident fellow at The MacDowell Colony, EMPAC, The Maggie Allesee National Center for Choreography, Princeton University's Atelier Program, and Kabul University. Lars is the recipient of the 2008 Sherwood Award, granted by Center Theatre Group to an innovative theatre artist in Los Angeles. He is a graduate of Swarthmore College and CalArts. His new performance installation HOLOSCENES - a triptych of massive aquariums inhabited by performers - explores the evolution of human endurance and habitual behavior in the context of natural catastrophe, particularly through the lens of mythic, contemporary and coming deluge.

TED Conferences

TED2014, TED Fellows Retreat 2013, TED2013, TEDActive 2012, TEDGlobal 2011

Areas of Expertise

Live Performance, New Media - Video Artist, hybrid artist

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

205791
Lars Jan
Posted almost 3 years ago
How can creatives use new technologies to increase empathy across cultural and geographic distances?
I am truly terrified when I read literally anything from the 18th or 19th century. The level of literacy and deduction, though not shared by a majority of people at the time, is stunning when compared with what seems to be the idea innovators and commentators in our age — with exceptions of course. But, might we be a much more creative, if less literate, age? I'd wager yes. How do we raise both bars...
205791
Lars Jan
Posted almost 3 years ago
How can creatives use new technologies to increase empathy across cultural and geographic distances?
Sure, I've traveled a ton with just a handful of hand gesture, and a ton of patience and time. But I could never be particularly interesting, or funny — and I always felt so frustrated at the fact that here I was, in the presence of people who I'll never likely meet again, and I just can't ask the questions I want to ask... Still, there's something so fundamental about realizing that you don't need to talk to have a pretty great time with strangers...
205791
Lars Jan
Posted almost 3 years ago
How can creatives use new technologies to increase empathy across cultural and geographic distances?
Hey Arne, just caught this post from earlier. I entirely agree with you here. Just like HBO revitalized what TV could be for an audience that had largely given up on it — and also sparked a bunch of competitors to raise the level of their offerings — I wonder when some game visionary will create an interactive experience that is much more than entertainment. This may exist, and I just don't know of it....