Lars Jan

Artistic Director / Founder, Early Morning Opera
Los Angeles, CA, United States

About Lars

Bio

LARS JAN is a director, writer, artist, and the founding artistic director of EARLY MORNING OPERA (EMO), a genre-bending performance + art lab whose works explore emerging technologies, live audiences, and unclassifiable experience. Jan is the son of émigrés from Afghanistan and Poland.

His original works have been commissioned and presented by The Whitney Museum, BAM Next Wave Festival, Sundance Film Festival, Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center, REDCAT, Hammer Museum, Guggenheim Museum, Symphony Space, and Toronto Nuit Blanche Festival.

EMO has been supported by multiple awards from the NEA and Center for Cultural Innovation; Robert Rauschenberg Foundation; MAP Fund; Surdna Foundation; NEFA’s National Theatre Project; NPN’s Creation Fund; and the New York State Council on the Arts. He has held artistic and teaching residencies across the US, including at the Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA, where he was an inaugural artist-in-residence (2012–14).

In 2015, EMO’s HOLOSCENES will be exhibited in various iterations at the Pasadena Museum of California Art, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, and the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art. ABACUS will tour to Edinburgh, and upcoming performance work, The Institute of Memory (TIMe), will tour to REDCAT, the Portland Institute of Contemporary Art, Institute of Contemporary Art Boston. Jan is a TED Senior Fellow.

TED Conferences

TED2015, TED2014, TED2013, TEDActive 2012, TEDGlobal 2011

Areas of Expertise

Live Performance, New Media - Video Artist, hybrid artist

I'm passionate about

Live Audiences; The Next Renaissance; The Anthropocene; Multi-disciplinarity; Research; Art & Science; Steadicams; Bunraku; The reincarnation of Golden Retrievers; The Screen Age; Mountains

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

205791
Lars Jan
Posted over 3 years ago
How can creatives use new technologies to increase empathy across cultural and geographic distances?
I am truly terrified when I read literally anything from the 18th or 19th century. The level of literacy and deduction, though not shared by a majority of people at the time, is stunning when compared with what seems to be the idea innovators and commentators in our age — with exceptions of course. But, might we be a much more creative, if less literate, age? I'd wager yes. How do we raise both bars...
205791
Lars Jan
Posted over 3 years ago
How can creatives use new technologies to increase empathy across cultural and geographic distances?
Sure, I've traveled a ton with just a handful of hand gesture, and a ton of patience and time. But I could never be particularly interesting, or funny — and I always felt so frustrated at the fact that here I was, in the presence of people who I'll never likely meet again, and I just can't ask the questions I want to ask... Still, there's something so fundamental about realizing that you don't need to talk to have a pretty great time with strangers...
205791
Lars Jan
Posted over 3 years ago
How can creatives use new technologies to increase empathy across cultural and geographic distances?
Hey Arne, just caught this post from earlier. I entirely agree with you here. Just like HBO revitalized what TV could be for an audience that had largely given up on it — and also sparked a bunch of competitors to raise the level of their offerings — I wonder when some game visionary will create an interactive experience that is much more than entertainment. This may exist, and I just don't know of it....