Rob Ross

Los Angeles, CA, United States

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Rob Ross
Posted about 4 years ago
LIVE TED Conversation: Join TED Speaker Sean Carroll
Ok, so my brain just exploded a little bit, but I'm used to that now when discussing these subjects :) If I cross the EH of a BH and I'm looking *opposite* my direction of travel (away from the singularity) I understand that what I would see would not look any different to me than before I crossed the EH. - just normal looking stars as before. I still don't know what I would see if I look *toward* the singularity. If the singularity were at a point in space, I expect no photons to ever reach me from anywhere between my current location and the singularity, so I would not be able to "see" anything in that direction. If the singularity is not in space but "in the future" as you say, then again, I would expect not to see anything from it since it hasn't happened yet. I guess I can simplify by just asking you : If I cross the EH of a BH and look towards where I perceive is the "center", what would I see? As an example, say I fall into the BH with a friend who is 1 meter in front of me as we both approach the BH. I see him disappear as he cross the EH. Then I cross. I would think I should never be able to see him again. How do photons from his body bounce back into my eyeballs once we're both inside the EH? Thanks again!
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Rob Ross
Posted about 4 years ago
LIVE TED Conversation: Join TED Speaker Sean Carroll
Why would it not be the case that to an observer crossing the event horizon of a black hole, the interior remains eternally black? I.e, in the direction of the singularity, all is black? A photon that just crosses the EH cannot escape, so why would a photon say 1 meter inside the EV ever be able to travel >= 1 meter from the EV? And if that is the case, how can any photons inside the EH and just past the observer ever bounce back from anything inside the BH into the in-falling observers eyeballs? Thanks!