Kim Bunting

CEO/Founder, Business Access LLC
Dallas, TX, United States

About Kim

Bio

I am an entrepreneur running a tech company in the social services industry since 1999.

An idea worth spreading

we are the people we've been waiting for - it's time to stop trying to do things as we've always done and start using our incredible knowledge to solve age-old problems.

I'm passionate about

people fully realizing their potential

Talk to me about

Lifting the tides of all the world's citizens so that we evolve as a species.

People don't know I'm good at

video games

Comments & conversations

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Kim Bunting
Posted over 3 years ago
Peter Saul: Let's talk about dying
I'm in the same boat Sean. My father now has only 30-60 more days left, but the ten years or so leading up to this have been a constant series of going in and out of the hospital, rehab centers, long-term nursing care, etc.. I kid him that his medical bills are the reason the US medicare budget has ballooned. In all seriousness though, the last five years he has primarily been bed-ridden. When home, he required home health aide care. All of his organs had decreased functioning and the combination of issues required 15 medicines a day, a special diet, and much other care taking. It could be said that we're all happy we had the extra five or so years, but I don't think many of us would. His 53-year marriage to my mother changed from husband/wife to patient/care taker. His retirement savings were enough for a healthy man, but not for a medically unstable one. He visited with family members but fell asleep during most conversations and/or had such dementia he couldn't follow along. As a result, both he and my mother have become most isolated than they ever were. It's ending now and we all feel better knowing how and when it will happen. We've communicated much more openly since we got the word. All of us, including him, have a sense of relief.
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Kim Bunting
Posted over 3 years ago
Which video game has challenged your perspective on the way you live your life and how?
World of Warcraft. It didn't change my perspective, but it has taught me a lot about teamwork that I use in my everyday life. Understanding the roles in group projects (a tank, a healer, those that just concentrate on getting the job done) takes on a new perspective when it's a group of five people, ten people or twenty-five. These days, much of my play is more about observing the interactions of the other players than the competitiveness of the game itself.
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Kim Bunting
Posted over 3 years ago
Aleph Molinari: Let's bridge the digital divide!
As the founder of a company that has distributed computers and Internet access to more than 10,000 low-income American families over the past 12 years, I respectfully disagree that center-based computing is good enough. Some exposure is certainly better than none - I applaud Aleph's efforts for getting technology out there. I have seen first hand that the impact a computer/access/computer literacy has on a low-income home is ASTRONOMICAL. It increases highschool graduation rates. It increases household income potential and stability. It reduces dependency on government programs (especially publicly funded transportation and childcare services). It improves access to services, including medical services. It opens options beyond the confines of the neighborhood the family is in. Our programs (which are all based on one computer per household) have resulted in 84% off of welfare (up to seven years later) in a long-term program in Dallas, 78% reduction in recidivism in a program for women coming out of the New Jersey state prison system, 156% earnings gains in a deep rural area... and on and on. Ours aren't the only programs proving the point. Aldeph is right, it's not just a matter of plopping a computer into someone's lap. Training, education, mentoring, modeling, etc.. are all important aspects of making sure it has the value intended. Rather than shy away from dysfunctional homes, we recognize that the computer is a mechanism to pinpoint "just-in-time" interventions in vulnerable households. It offers a place to communicate, learn, and model new behaviors. You can learn anger management in a classroom and then hope you remember what to do when triggered, or you can have tools to help you cope right at your fingertips, right when you need them. I've seen 10,000+ people's lives be transformed. I know they will be changed forever. I will shout from mountain tops for as long as I can - WE MUST FIND A WAY TO CONNECT EVERY HOME!
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Kim Bunting
Posted almost 4 years ago
Is the generation in education getting less intelligent than the ones before them or smarter?
I think the generation of the age to be in the educational system right now is A LOT more intelligent than the generations before them (and I am of the generations before them). They can process information quicker, understand the epistomology of situations faster, plow through data more efficiently, weed out BS faster, take action faster, try new things faster, and on and on. One of the reasons our educational system is falling apart is that is has completely lost pace with the evolution of the intelligence of our young people. Look at the drop out that can't pass a math class but makes thousands of dollars selling drugs? Look at the drop out who can't follow a teachers instruction in the classroom but is a highly ranked soldier in the local gang? The entrepreneurs who blew off college? I believe this is a part of the fall of politics and hierarchies in the US. This generation doesn't buy it. It looks like a bunch of old men fighting over the last piece of chicken on the kitchen table while someone left the barn door open.
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Kim Bunting
Posted almost 4 years ago
As Dave stressed "Let patients help", my question is how can patients help their doctors?
Having been through an uncommon and extreme medical condition, I had the opportunity to work with several doctors - some exceptionally wonderful and some not so good. I believe a patient can help a doctor in many ways. 1. Understand that medicine is a science, but nothing is exact in the human body. Your doctor is attempting to interept what is happening and fix it at the same time. Nothing is absolute. On the journey of curing a diease, symptoms may change because you're cured, because another ismasking the original, because a drug is placating it... If you understand that your doctor is gathering facts and reacting, you can feed them more information. 2. Comply with your doctor's requests or tell them you aren't going to. If they prescribe medicine or activities - fully comply with their requests. If it then does not work, it gives them more information to attempt to understand what is going on. If you don't agree with the request, tell them immediately, so no time is lost with them expecting you to do something you are not. 3. Document your progress/lack of progress/ symptoms/ actions. This provides a doctor with valuable detailed information to help them diagnose what's happening. Vague "I don't feel well" doesn't help. "My stomache started hurting just after I ate pizza" or "My stomache has hurt after 8pm every night for the past two weeks" helps. 4. Bring up ideas. Understand that what you find on the Internet is not a medical degree nor is it necessarily true. However, anything you think might match your situation, you should mention to your doctor. My great doctors shook their heads a few times and explained why my Internet discovery didn't fit my situation. My bad doctors got defensive that I even asked. 5. Change doctors if you don't feel you are getting enough information or options. Do the old school doctor a favor and get off of his rotation. There are plenty of new-minded doctors who look forward to intelligent patients.
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Kim Bunting
Posted about 4 years ago
Have you reinvented yourself, or started a movement?
I started a movement. Twelve years ago, I started a business that helps low-income and other vulnerable populations move to self-sufficiency through an online community, online training and a computer and internet access in their homes. If they complete their program goals, they earn ownership of the computer. Our program helped start the movement of using technology in social service programs. In the beginning, we had many people who thought it couldn’t be done. “Poor people with hock the computers for crack!” they declared. “Social services have to be done face-to-face,” they said. “This will never work!” The nay-sayers were wrong… We've served more than 10,000 families in 180 programs throughout the U.S.. We've helped people on welfare, at-risk youth, people coming out of prison, kids coming out of the foster care system, Native Americans, and many more. We’ve been studied by several universities and the results have been outstanding – our program in Dallas has resulted in 84% of our participants getting off welfare AND staying off (up to seven years after program exit!) Opening a new market has been a struggle – particularly because most of our programs are paid for through the government. We’ve learned that getting outstanding results isn’t the only thing that matters – sometimes we’re fighting against the whims of the general public (“the government shouldn’t spend money!”), sometimes we’re fighting against people being set in their ways (“we need to see the whites of their eyes to really know they’re doing it!”), sometimes we’re fighting against program staff that just don’t really care about helping people. Add the drone of those voices to the difficulty of maintaining a business in these economic times, and you get a sense of the constant negativity pushing back against us from all sides. It’s relentless. Sometimes it feels like it’s just too much to keep enduring. But we fight on, for our achievers, because it's changing their lives.
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Kim Bunting
Posted about 4 years ago
Is getting better than having?
I love the journey. Early in my life, I was so fixated on completing the goal that I missed the opportunity to enjoy the process of getting there. These days, I value the journey, even when it's a hard road (as it has been as a small business owner in the tough economy). I feel fortunate that I can suffer negative situations with some levity, because in the context of a much bigger journey they are just bumps along the way. The strength of that is always there to draw from. I'm with you Connor, just getting something without earning it has little to no meaning to me at all.
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Kim Bunting
Posted about 4 years ago
Wealth and power have been our conventional measures of success. What definition will better sustain us now and how can we move into it?
The way to personal contentment is to stop looking for an external measurement of success. Only we can create our own definitions of success. Conventional models are what individuals extract and incorporate into their own belief systems. Maybe what your mother was saying is that she hasn't accomplished what she wanted to...