Peter Fox

Witham, Essex, United Kingdom

About Peter

Bio

Born 1957
Engineering degree
35 years in computing

Areas of Expertise

PHP development, System analysis and Design

An idea worth spreading

There are 12 Rs not just 3. (See website for details.)
Reading, wRiting, aRithmetic, Relationships, Reviewing, Responsibility,
Reflecting, Researching, Reporting, Reasoning, Remembering, Resolve
Also 12 Maturities.

I'm passionate about

Real ale and real pubs.
Pottering round the countryside on my bicycle.
Good writing.

Talk to me about

Poetry and English

People don't know I'm good at

'Seeing through walls'

Comments & conversations

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Peter Fox
Posted about 1 year ago
Prevention training
EVERYBODY PANIC! General situational awareness is a good thing to have on the street or in a bar or in fact anywhere. Many more people get killed by cars mounting the pavement than bombs. Many more people get killed by drunken fights. Many more people get killed by steadily escalating domestic violence. Screaming headlines and hurry-up dummy scenarios lead to over-reaction, confusion and chaos. As anyone who stewards an event or manages a venue will know, panic leads to all sorts of trouble. There are numerous examples where a stampeding crowd at a stadium has trampled dozens to death. OTOH 'on the street' concerns ought to be reported -- but how, and how (say for example) the police should respond to the caller (it's MUCH more complicated than you might think) from the genuinely concerned caller's point of view needs to be discussed and illustrated with/to the general public; who after all have hundreds of eyes and ears. The best sort of incident is one that never becomes an incident. Somebody spots early signs and the reports to 'the authorities' are taken seriously. Just to reiterate: Violence pervades society and those that consider themselves 'Boy scout bomb-spotters' should spend a bit more time looking at people in social situations.
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Peter Fox
Posted over 1 year ago
When to write a book?
Of course there is a problem of too many people who 'feel they have a book inside them' but refuse to leave it there. The answer to the 'is it worth it' question is to ask some people -- then subtract something for their wish to be enthusiastic for you. If you personally are wondering about writing then start and see what happens and get feedback from a writer's group. Until you've written a quarter of a million words you are unlikely to (a) have found your voice, (b) got rid of tropes, bad habits (c) learned the craft of keeping readers engaged. ie. You have to do the mileage to get consistent quality.
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Peter Fox
Posted over 1 year ago
What can we do to change education?
"What do you want as a product when these student finish their education?" 12 Rs - Essential basics Reading wRiting aRithmetic Relationships Reviewing Responsibility Reflecting Researching Reporting Reasoning Remembering Resolve 12 Maturities - Proper education Ambition Sociable personality Fitness and good health Curiosity, enthusiasm for learning and knowledge Confidence Stand up for principles Develop and defend own opinions. Artistic appreciation and accomplishment Empathy Excellence of Rs Imagination and abstract thought Temptation : Awareness and resistance. Self discipline
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Peter Fox
Posted over 1 year ago
Have you ever felt your thought is not very independent ? How you solve it ?
No. I may be unaware of things but my first 'secret' is to completely ignore mass media (and the advertising that goes with it - eg use Ad-block on my web browser.) Then be cynical. Start asking questions. Keep asking questions. After a while you discover how to scratch at received wisdom, how to recognise the signs of weakness as others seek to defend an assumed position, and build your skills at debate. The next level is developing your own ideas and letting people scoff. OK you may be naive and need to do more research, but so long as you don't retreat into taking a position because of emotional reasons, you'll learn, be prompted to look deeper and so on. Often after a discussion you'll do research that confirms you point of view and demolishes somebody else's. At 17 you want to 'be different'. It's the very nature of youth. Get on and read, research, argue, write... ...then be amazed at 20 how simple your ideas were three years ago. Finally, a lot of people have had similar ideas in a thousand fields. If you find some appealing then dig deeper. You'll probably want to develop that with your own ideas. So metaphorically, 'making pizza' is not original but the way you make it with fancy toppings is a bit of experimentation... then you hack the shape... then you fold and double bake... and so on. Experiment based on older ideas is a productive way of being independent.
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Peter Fox
Posted over 1 year ago
Females mammals are the underpinning of written language. Sex & sexism exists in every literate culture, so why wouldn't it be in language?
(Yet more wizard powers! How can you see me quaking at the awesomeness of your thesis. ) I'm not threatened just appalled by your feeble reasoning masquerading as academic research of a 'professor'. Your argument is tissue-thin and you try to justify it by the syllogism:- Some theories took a long time to gain acceptance. My theory doesn't have scientific credibility. Therefore my theory must be right all along. Bill Bryson is an amusing and accessible journalist but hardly a scientific authority. Much of his etymology in Mother Tongue is tosh. I should stick to reading books - Gosh 100! - and learning about scientific rigour. Perhaps you should make your thesis a real thesis submitted to a real professor and see just how far it falls short.)