Matthew Ham

Toronto, Canada

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Matthew Ham
Posted almost 3 years ago
Rethink the human-centered airline experience. *A TEDActive Travel Project*
I this it is a great idea to give people the ability to meet other people with similar interests and get together with them. However, I think that people are already so frustrated by flying that it would be unlikely that they would go through any more steps before their flight. Even if some did meet up online, making things work so they did not interfere with all the people who did not go online to meet up might prove difficult. If this networking is to happen, I think it would be best to have it be implement first on the plane itself. With networking being available on more and more aircraft, I think it might be possible to meet people of similar interests while on the plane and engage in discussions. Taking this a step further, the airline could allow for people to change seats during the flight to sit next to people of similar interests (including the interest of being left alone in a quiet space). From their you could have board games (digital if need be) available for people to play with each other or other forms of social entertainment. Dealing with carry-ons might prove difficult, but I'm sure something could be arranged. What I'm saying is I believe social networking would be more successful when you're actually on the same plane sharing the same experience. Being stuck in a long aluminum cylinder thousands of feet in the air for several hours together creates a sense of camaraderie that I feel would be more likely to compel people to reach out to the people around them. Once people got accustomed to being able to meet others on the plane, they would be more likely to reach out before they got on.
Noface
Matthew Ham
Posted almost 3 years ago
Rethink the human-centered airline experience. *A TEDActive Travel Project*
I feel that attitude is, for most people, heavily dependent on their working environment. When a company is so focused on profit that they ignore the people who help them earn it, employees often feel like nothing more than a replaceable cog in the machine rather than people. Just like being treated like a number or moneybag hurts people's experience of flying, so too is the serving experience hurt by ignoring the humanity of employees. I think that an important part of improving the attitude of those working in the airline industry is making them feel like an important part of the company and of the experience of flying. I've flown with WestJet in Canada several times, and I've found the attitude of the employees to be much better than most airlines I've dealt with. I think this is because WestJet puts a priority on their employees by making them feel like an important part of the organization. This approach works anywhere. If your employees are happy, your customers will be too. You cannot expect to grow great crops with bad soil. I feel that this has to be the foundation of any changes in the flying experience. Just as we're all discussing ways to improve the experience of flying, I feel that this kind of discussion should be an integral part of the way airlines relate to their customers as well as their employees. Make people feel like they matter and they will help you.