Leonard Carr

Leonard Carr Consulting
Johannesburg, South Africa

About Leonard

Bio

I am a clinical psychologist who has over thirty years experience in counselling in lay, voluntary and professional settings.

I have developed an integral appreciative perspective on personality psychology that draws on insights from many schools of psychology and spiritual traditions.

Appreciative Personality Mapping is an interactive process that allows people to create a unique comprehensive framework for use in personal, relationship and organisational development.

I run growth courses and workshops based on this model and its applications to the areas of leadership, organisational functioning, personal growth and interpersonal relationships.

I am a specialist in personality and relationships, and have been cited in books and other publications. I am regularly invited to present workshops and talks both locally and internationally.

My passion for understanding people has taken me into diverse settings spanning virtually the whole scope of psychological practice.

I have worked as an expert witness, accredited Mediator and forensic psychologist.

I am committed to serving the general community input and have worked for a large number of respected associations, organisations and institutions dealing with counselling for families and children.

I have provided ongoing training, individual and group case consultation to many welfare and counselling organizations. I currently consult to NGO and Government Organisations, major corporate institutions as well as small and medium businesses.

In my clinical practice I offer psychotherapy, hypnotherapy, family therapy, couples therapy and trauma debriefing.

I have appeared on national and international television and radio.
I had a show called “The Soulfulness of Everyday Life” on Infusion Radio (www.infusionradio.com) which is part of the World Space Satellite Radio Network and a weekly radio show on 101.9 Chai FM.

I have contributed to a number of popular and business publications on diverse topics ranging from organisational development and management issues, marriage and parenting and the personality.

My weekly column in The Times called Shrink Rap.

I am married and have five children.

Languages

English

Areas of Expertise

Psychotherapy & Spirituality, Executive Coaching, Consulting, and training, Hypnotherapy, Personal, Relationship and Business Development, Management Development, Leadership Development and Transformation, Diversity and Inclusion Management, Trauma Debriefing

An idea worth spreading

The light of a single flame has the power to enlighten the entire world, one candle at a time. The combined wisdoms of Talmud, science and psychology will be used to show that substance and light are synonymous. Everyone has the power within their own particular sphere of influence to enlighten and appreciate (in all senses of the word) the value and substance of others.
Appreciative witnessing gives individuals the power to illuminate the unique qualities, talents and abilities in others. With a more profound sense of their own value and potential people experience themselves to be more substantial, rich and whole.
Having a deeply felt sense of their own substance they see the light in the world, the transcendent and inclusive reality of the world being a big ecology.
They also recognise the value of their own contribution to that ecology and by extension the value of all other beings that share their world.

I'm passionate about

Creating an appreciative society that is values and ethics based, characterised by compassion, good-will, mutual respect and commitmnet to the greater good.

Talk to me about

Appreciatve Psychology Approach, Keynote Speaking, Workshops, Executive Coaching, Leadership Development, Diversity, Childrens Therapeutic Stories, Psychotherapy, Couples Therapy, Trauma Debriefing

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

110211
Leonard Carr
Posted over 3 years ago
What can we do, as citizens to promote tolerance in our daily lives ?
To clarify Caroline-I was suggesting a new way of looking at the issue that goes beyond the concept of tolerance. I was not challenging the definition of the word. In fact your dictionary definition illustrates my point about the concept implying somewhat of an arms length relationship. I am suggesting an alternative way of relating to difference.
110211
Leonard Carr
Posted over 3 years ago
What can we do, as citizens to promote tolerance in our daily lives ?
For me the issue goes beyond “tolerance”. Tolerance sounds like a somewhat forced or grudging effort to overcome negative feelings. The question is how do you invite people into a relationship that you will both enjoy and from which there will be mutual benefit? The message I would like to get acsossis the following: You relationships are a mirror of your own participation in the relationship. How people show up or not in your presence is a mirror of how you invite them in to participate or keep them peripheral in your world. People show up fully in relationships when they feel invited, welcomed, valued and wanted. People disappear or become a nuisance when they feel shut out, rejected, looked down upon or unwelcome. The behaviour of a person who feels excluded and disenfranchised inevitably makes them become someone you don’t wish to engage with. Your behaviour and their response to you become mutually supporting and the assumptions that you made about them appear to be confirmed in this self-fulfilling prophecy. In such an atmosphere people feel comfortable to make demands, claim space and resources in the relationship. When people feel respected it becomes safe for them to be vulnerable and frankly reveal their differences and even idiosyncrasies. When people experience your interest in them they become interesting. When they feel liked and valued, they feel comfortable to be authentic. Respectful curiosity invites the other person to engage with you and express their true impressions, thoughts, needs and feelings. Security relaxes people into playfulness, creativity and gives them the safety to risk-taking initiative. Admiration invites them to show their brilliance. If you make people feel embraced, valued and appreciated they will show their loyalty. When you sincerely invest in people they show you their potential. The bigger question is how you can teach adults and childern to create enviroments where people hosted in ways that bing out the best in them?
110211
Leonard Carr
Posted over 3 years ago
How do we overcome the tendency to slip back into the old routine of life - and truly capture and ACT on the lessons in talks like this?
Real change means action: Commit to small, concrete goals that work There is a well worn three-word statement, often used in new year’s resolutions, that guarantees failure to whatever task it is applied. The statement is “I will try”. It’s a statement about the future that by definition remains out of reach because the future remains eternally beyond the bounds of the present. It is a nebulous statement pregnant with escape clauses, avoidance of accountability, evasions of reason, excuses and cop-outs. One company uses the promise of trying harder as their motto because it sounds good on first flush and can never lead to an accusation that they did not at least try, even if they did not succeed. It is the ultimate promise of no promise. It has a superficial ring of a guarantee of good service. It is a vague promise of undefined intention with no actual commitment to action. What difference does it make to say: “I will try to work harder, be more honest, lo se weight, predict the future or spin gold out of straw”? Real change and success come with a commitment to well-defined, observable and measurable action. For example, I will eat two hundred grams less than I need to each day and this will ensure that over time I will lo se weight, albeit slowly. I will be more honest by disclosing my true motives and intentions to people, by not using company stationery, time or equipment. I will work harder by making sure that I meet goals set for me, or that I set for myself. It is more effective to make commitments to small, concrete goals that will accumulate and build into big accomplishments than to make grandiose statements about trying that sound marvellous and amount to nothing. As the saying goes from a brand that exudes an air of success — just do it.
110211
Leonard Carr
Posted over 3 years ago
Do you for Foresee a Bright Future? We face greater and increasing threats to how we now live, do you THINK we can change?
The light of a single flame has the power to enlighten the entire world, one candle at a time. The combined wisdoms of spirituality, science and psychology are used to show that substance and light are synonymous. Every person has the power within their own particular sphere of influence to enlighten and appreciate (in all senses of the word) the value and substance of others. Through appreciative witnessing, every individual has the power to illuminate the unique qualities, talents and abilities that other people possess. When people have a more profound sense of their own value and potential, they experience themselves as a consequence to be more substantial, rich and whole. When people have a deeply felt sense of their own substance they see the light in the world, the transcendent and inclusive reality of the world being a big ecology. They also recognise the value of their own contribution to that ecology and by extension the value of all other beings that share their world. Light also implies wisdom and values. Spreading light in this sense means creating more appreciation of how the worlds of individuals, groups and cultures can cohere together into a harmonious order. This is the true definition of peace. The whisper of a candle flame symbolises the power of truth to speak for itself. The test needs to be no more than the resonance of the ideas in the heart, the scrutiny of common sense and rationality, and the transcendence and inclusivity of the ideas that make them universal. I believe that these ideas are worth spreading for their potential to create a world that is more inhabitable through solving complex social problems using simple methods of re-humanising interaction that can be taught to virtually anybody. An appreciative world is one in which people view each other as sources of richness and potential as opposed to competition and threat. In such a world, you have a tangible felt and deeply understood sense of your intrinsic value and potential which gives rise to greater self-respect and self worth. This results in you taking yourself on a physical, psychological, and spiritual level. It would give you the motivation and inspiration to take your talent and potential seriously. This in turn gives rise to a sense of optimism and hope for the future. This net result would be more self-care, more commitment and investment in realising your potential and a bright future. The natural outgrowth of this experience of your own humanity is the realisation that other people, albeit that they are not always aware of it, have the same value and potential. This leads to you treating others as allies in co-creating a shared resourceful world, bringing peace and harmony into their lives. The possibility exists for this vision to take root in communities from a pre-school, primary and high school level. I would like to see it in homes, enhancing personal growth and family relationships. It is possible that appreciative living could be used in organisations, enhancing personal and team effectiveness, fostering a deep and real appreciation of the richness in diversity and enhancing leadership and management skills. This approach could be adopted by therapists, mentors, teachers, community leaders and coaches who have the power and the opportunity to participate in creating a more appreciative world. In a society or community where there is a fatalistic approach life, one witnesses people from an early age engaging in high risk sexual behaviour, violence and addiction. The breakdown of values manifests also in the disintegration of the fabric of society manifesting in marriage and family breakdown, corruption and high levels of crime. These social phenomena show that people are adopting a self-centred survivalist approach to life rather than one which is ecological and creative. An appreciative society is one that is values and ethics based. If people take their own lives and the lives of others more seriously, then they would be naturally receptive to learning how best to do this. Learning about and applying values makes sense to people who appreciate the value of their own and the lives of others. An appreciative society would be characterised by more compassion, good-will and mutual respect. An appreciative society is one in which people perceive themselves as contributors to a larger ecology for the benefit of the greater good.
110211
Leonard Carr
Posted over 3 years ago
What can we do, as citizens to promote tolerance in our daily lives ?
I have written many articles on de-humanising, depreciating and exclusionary practices. I and am in the process of turning these articles (many of which are on my website) into practice programs using actors, recorded and animated therapeutic stories into teaching materials. These materials are being adapted to all age groups so that adults and children can be exposed to the same programs in schools or communities. I am also in the process of writing a book on an appreciative approach to healing in the personal, relationship and social realms. This book will be full of tools and ideas about how to re-humanise the world in each or your spheres of influence.
110211
Leonard Carr
Posted over 3 years ago
What can we do, as citizens to promote tolerance in our daily lives ?
Imagine that you are being recorded and that your response will be watched by the most valued and highly respected members of your personal and social circle. Deicide on how you would like their analysis and commentary about your responses to go. What would you like them to say about you, to think about you, learn about you and remember you by? Consider how your response will affect your relationship with your own spirit-will you remain loyal and win or betray and lose the honour of your own spirit? Even if you play it safe and keep yourself clear of scorn from the outside, how will you live with the censure of your own inner voice? What makes these situations difficult is that you are not sure which audience you need to play to and who’s sensibilities and inters you need to privilege in order to keep yourself safe or advantaged. Your values show in what you are prepared to sacrifice. De-humanising practices are anti social. Why should you be constrained in your responses by social convention?