Thomas Pisarchick

Fort Mill, SC, United States

About Thomas

Bio

I anxiously await what the future holds. Thought is free so have more.

Languages

English

An idea worth spreading

Where the mind goes energy flows.

I'm passionate about

Enjoying this life and the survival / evolution of the species. Thinking of ways that could be, if only we can make it that far. Colonizing space soon. Living life freely and the course of music

Talk to me about

The thing you most feel to say.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

155840
Thomas Pisarchick
Posted over 1 year ago
Ed Boyden: A light switch for neurons
Have some Faith. Actually what worries me most about these technologies is that they are put to wide scale use before we understand the overall effects and how to prevent mutations. At times we use something to cure a situation that we do not understand how it works, we just notice that it does. Many modern day medical practices started on this approach. Once we start using viruses to cure disease by altering our DNA we are creating potential for something to change and spread...
155840
Thomas Pisarchick
Posted over 2 years ago
Brian Greene: Is our universe the only universe?
There are a few questions I have to raise about some of the points here, although I will have to watch it more diligently to find them all. That being said I will pose one question at this time. When the Bang part of the big bang was spoken of, the "fuel" existing in such an efficient state that it would continue to 're-explode' causing multiple universes, as the premise. With the sphere being the most efficient freestanding shape, why would it be thought that the universes would be anything but inside one another? If the bang exploded space outward, in at least three dimensions, the most efficient way would be equally outward in all dimensions. A temporal difference in explosions would lead to the second explosion moving towards the first in all directions simultaneously at the same speed, just one step behind. Therefore, foregoing an increase in energy of the bang, the universes would not 'bump into one another', but instead chase each other with an ever increasing lead. The temporal difference being caused by the difference of energy from one explosion to the next, liken it to the change in radius if it helps. The more explosions the total less energy, the less energy the further from the initial point of expansion, leading to larger gaps between the universes. The total energy of the universes would be decreasing as well if the explosion was on the 'surface' of the fuel, with decreasing surface area the total energy of the universes would also decrease. Unless of course the fuel is more dense toward the center, then there could be a density to surface area ratio that would allow the proceeding universes to remain at the same total energy, if the surface energy density was in a direct and equal inverse proportion to the reduction in radius. Then again at that point it may not be energy, exuded from that Bang, but instead a force that aligns energy.
155840
Thomas Pisarchick
Posted almost 3 years ago
How does one not acquiesce to suffering?
Also what can the givers (country) of the aid do? Such as change the taxes laws for their corporations doing business there. Buildings, schools, a grocery store, and fulfilling basic needs to bring the culture into a modern world where they have a factory, somewhat like GE has done. Be best to have the American companies do that type of thing to receive all of the tax breaks they already do get from America. I am even less familiar with other countries corporate tax law to speak for them.
155840
Thomas Pisarchick
Posted about 3 years ago
Lucianne Walkowicz: Finding planets around other stars
Unfortunately with this whole global economic woes many people have trouble justifying a manned space program let alone a mission for Mars. The bright side is private industry is finally breaking into the space game, with Virgin Galactic already having sold a couple million in tickets to take people into LEO for a mere $200,000. With time and innovation this price will drop drastically and those that take the first flights will likely want more. This could feasibly lead to lunar destinations or space hotels of a sort. With the private sector innovating travel the cost of missions will go down drastically. This is going to be a crucial step in order to get our government to fund a manned mission to Mars even when the technical difficulties are worked out. The thing I'm wondering is will it be a government or company that puts the first man on Mars?
155840
Thomas Pisarchick
Posted about 3 years ago
Lucianne Walkowicz: Finding planets around other stars
Two nights ago I was telling a friend how spectral analysis could be used to determine the atmospheric makeup of a planet. It's neat to learn that it is actually being utilized. I always like the assurance that comes with the validation of an idea I have had. The Idea came to me earlier this year when thinking of how our atmosphere has changed with the stages of life and that by observing the spectrum one could see what stage the planet was in from a great distance at the speed of light. This was around the time I was thinking how neat it would be to fill gigantic lenses with different gasses and putting a group of these into orbit around the sun to create the first ever human intergalactic art piece. Like a sign for home whenever we really start the manned exploration of space.