Joseph Nowinski

Boy Scouts Eagle Scout
Stevens Point, WI, United States

About Joseph

Bio

I'm a man from the suburbs of Chicago. I moved to Wisconsin because of school and fell in love. Here I stay to finish my education as an educator and try to spread the Gospel of the importance of universal humanity and love. It's hard. It sucks not being perfect and always wanting and needing things that are not essential, but I do what I can for the ones I love and even the ones I don't. I speak out for the needs of people who don't have it as well as I do, and try to stay active in political and social discussions. I also frequent TED to help spread it's message. I was most hurt when some family members said that "their ideas were more independent than mine" as an excuse to not visit the website. That was hurtful, but I strive to at least get truth out to those who seek it, and even those who don't. That's why I strive to be an educator.

Languages

English

Areas of Expertise

Theatre - Directing, Acting, Dramaturgy, Music, Computer Sciecne, Political Activism, Brewing Beer and WIne tasting, Disc Golf

An idea worth spreading

The world is filled with 7 billion brothers and sisters of all shapes and sizes. If we all took one day to work together, I think we would find it isn't so hard to realize it's all our house, and if we don't start taking care of it, the house has the power over us in the end. Let's start thinking about how we can make a better house today.

I'm passionate about

Life and the spread of the idea of "global intelligence." There are things I will never learn from so many intelligent people. So I want to open the world to that idea, and creating understanding.

Talk to me about

Anything please. I love to conversation. I am an idea person, so as long as you have an idea and you have some reasoning behind it, I like to hear it

People don't know I'm good at

Anything. I'm pretty sure with a little time and effort I can learn to do anything. I wouldn't be the best at it, but as they say a jack of all trades is a master of none.

Comments & conversations

107189
Joseph Nowinski
Posted over 4 years ago
Harvey Fineberg: Are we ready for neo-evolution?
There was a similar talk on here very recently about Bio-engineering, and I think both of these talks raise the point of evolution. The really scary thing about it is that we aren't just changing our own evolution, but we are manipulating the evolution of so many other species on the planet. So how do we go about this? I don't think the western (or eastern) cultures are ready for these ideas. We see things very simply: an easy way out. Can you imagine the improper use of forced evolution? This sort of thing is really going to be a problem. Not to say I'm against the idea. I think the understanding of the process of evolution and our manipulation of it is incredibly interesting and truly amazing. However, we live in a corporate culture in the United States that is based very simply on the almighty profit. These forced evolutions can be easily bought and sold and there will be those that take it to extremes and those that will get killed. Yet, we do not wish to change our culture and society. The west has been incredibly reluctant to change it's setting even after the fall of the USSR, and it's showing a really awful drag on the people in those societies. To give them something that is a genetic infusion of longevity/strength/etc. would be quite an easy way out for most that have the money, and that would pose the greatest inequality of all: A literal race of supermen. Only the people who can afford it will want to keep it, and then we get into another set of problems. These are not simply ethics that we deal with, but huge socio-economic, and cultural issues we are facing. The flash point has already struck in the Middle East, and the excess fuel is seeping into the remaining parts of the world. If we unable to deal with the current problems at hand, this will only lead to more hatred, fear, and oppression for those that will be unable to achieve this medical evolution. Shakespeare never had to get a creative boost.
107189
Joseph Nowinski
Posted over 4 years ago
Sam Richards: A radical experiment in empathy
I love the message of the piece... Empathy. It's truly something that is beyond most people and is the most complex of all human cogitative interactions. There is no greater ability of the human experience than to actually feel what another human being is feeling. I loved the talk, but I would understand those that don't and their reasons. People who are opposed pose logical reasons, but the wonderful thing about empathy is that it might be one of the few reactions that we have that is both logical and emotional. It is logical to express and feel empathy, because it should represent our need to help others and in a sense progress the society and it's weakest or most oppressed members. However it is a cognitive reaction, and affects our actions in a way logic might not dictate, thus an emotional response. I think we lose the argument for empathy when we deal with personal experiences, because if a series of experiences at a personal level negatively affect empathy, there is little one can do to inspire it. Belief inspires many things, but our modern social, cultural, and religious views can be based in hatred, especially the hatred of those that are not like us in appearance, idea, or even name. The key of empathy relies in one very important idea: We are all the same, and therefore to discriminate for any reason because of color, race, religion, social status, employment status, sex, sexual orientation, etc is discriminating against everyone. Yes, certain religions have upsetting views on all of these things, but once again, what did we learn from empathy? We are all equal. Therefore we should be treated the same. This idea surpasses religious and cultural beliefs and intentions because they were and are made by biased people. These people are not bad and have some truth that represents their arguments, but it doesn't change the basic fact. We are all equal. Or at least we should be.
107189
Joseph Nowinski
Posted over 4 years ago
Chade-Meng Tan: Everyday compassion at Google
I truly want to believe that there can be everyday compassion in our business world, and I do not deny that there are those that are trying. The reality of it comes in how one actually does business, and even though you come upon those that who are compassionate for others doesn't necessarily change the way a business model is run. To say CEOs and business owners are not compassionate is incorrect, it's who they are compassionate too. If Google was so compassionate they would pay every nation-states' corporate income tax because there are important funds in every nation-states' budget that go towards hungry children, health care, education, or sustainable technology. Yes, Google has tried and succeeded with worldwide projects to help towards those goals, but can we truly show compassion when the majority of companies remain in a business ethic that resembles social darwinism? I loved this talk, and if I ever own a business, I believe compassion for employee and customer are the same and essential. It also breeds happiness, which was pointed out very well. I wish more people in the United States felt the same way. I think they do for some and then will discriminate for whatever reason when there is a reason to discriminate. This fear brings us all down. In the end what is compassionate is sustainable technology, education, and health care. Can we truly live in a compassionate world if these things do not exist in abundance and for all people? I don't think so, so let's get crackin!
107189
Joseph Nowinski
Posted over 4 years ago
Dave Meslin: The antidote to apathy
I really loved this talk! What a great way to showcase the ability for everyday people to get involved! I wish more people did think that standing and speaking on what happens in politics was important. We need to speak up about what's really wrong with our countries: lack of information. We live in worlds that are surrounded by distractions and apathy because we are surrounded by distractions. People only care about "me and my own" because that's what we have raised. I agree. Let's start making a difference today!
107189
Joseph Nowinski
Posted over 4 years ago
Jackson Browne: A song inspired by the ocean
I think what should be said is quite simple. There are positives to all points of thought. Religions all speak on the positives of kindness and compassion. However, we are not made perfect, and our beliefs and ideas speak to both higher ideals and imperfections. If we understand that compassion is the main focus, not just for our families and friends, but for every other living creature that exists on this planet, we can go towards a future that will be truly positive. We just need to have love and understanding. It's so hard to do, because each of us is different and some of us feel out of place or angry in our modern society. Inclusion will only help, and once we can agree that what is good for the planet is good for us, then we can start to make it happen.
107189
Joseph Nowinski
Posted over 4 years ago
What dreams do you have for the world?
I dream of a world that embraces the basic and modern rights of all human beings and continues our sense of thoughtful adventure. We live in a world where the need for equality and transparency have become essential rights all people in the world can embrace. Plus, our universe is massive and we as humans still have many questions unanswered. We are running the human race into a hole because of our need for dependence, and these dependencies and the ignorance of them from most people are hurting our fragile Earth, and in the end if we screw it up it is only going to be for our loss. the planet will remain. If we are looking for the survival of the human race, we need to embrace similarities and the idea that was trying to be past down for all eternity. We are all brothers and sisters, and that if I love my children I must love all the world's children. I support humanism and the need for our species to create a sustainable yet progressive society that can not only embrace similarities but celebrate it's differences. In the end, it is about education, and if we cannot or refuse to educate our children in a culturally positive atmosphere to critically think, we will loose not only the positive aspects of our humanity but also our future on this planet. The time is now, and we need to extend the hand of peace and equality to all, and make people understand the responsibilities and sacrifices we all must make for a better world. In the end, all we need to do is just try our best to be nice to each other.
107189
Joseph Nowinski
Posted over 4 years ago
Stanley McChrystal: Listen, learn ... then lead
You know... I really liked this speech. I thought it was incredibly well crafted and really tried to bring out the humanity of today's battlefield. I don't know what it's like to watch your family member in a fire fight. Thought I disagree with the conflict, Gen. McChrystal was talking about very real things like compassion and learning from your subordinates that we could apply to everyday life. This man truly believes what he was doing for his country was just. Though I think time will tell differently, we cannot take what he said with anger and protest. We must embrace all messages for what they are: words people say. If we were all a little more open to the good things people said on all sides of any argument, we would live in a better world. Gen. McChrystal believes it too, he just has a very hardened stance, and rightly so, he's a military man. We can't forsake the military because they cause death and destruction. The military is the sword of the people and responsible use of all things should be what we strive for. I hope everyone who is upset by this speak thinks twice about it, and realized the good things. Those who are in huge support, think of the deaths that have occurred. Both are very important to how we must think about conflict in the future, for the next major war might be our last. Let's think and spread ideas we can all share and viewpoints from all walks of life. After all, we're only human, and to understand failure is to understand our greatest successes.
107189
Joseph Nowinski
Posted over 4 years ago
Eric Whitacre: A virtual choir 2,000 voices strong
I want to be apart of this... I found this the most wonderful thing have ever seen. It is truly fantastic when people from around the world can be part of a collaborative effort that is purely good. I am not afraid to admit I cried my eyes out. We are bombarded with news about death and destruction. People around us spew hate from their mouths. Our very humanity seems to be at stake. Not all is lost, and this video, though simple it may seem, might save the world. It is the essence of what all of us should strive for. Though we do not see the other 7 billion people, they still have voice, and all of them deserve to be heard. Thank you for changing my life today.