Nick Edwards

Brown University
Providence, RI, United States

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Comments & conversations

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Nick Edwards
Posted over 3 years ago
Paul Root Wolpe: It's time to question bio-engineering
@Connor Finnegan "The problem of bio-engineering comes into play when we tamper with the delicate systems of nature without foresight into the consequences of our actions." You're probably right. We, as humans, should be weigh out all possible outcomes of things before we do them. That way we can avoid all the pitfalls that are bound to come with progress. Come to think of it, with our hindsight, we should figure out a way to go back and warn Einstein, Christopher Columbus, and that guy/girl who first learned to harness fire. Think of all the eventual forest fires that resulted from just that one act of "emulating nature"!
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Nick Edwards
Posted over 3 years ago
Misunderstanding Ethics and the purpose of this talk
I think it's rather unfortunate that many people are getting the impression that these experiments are completely unregulated. In academic science in the US, before conducting any human research, the scientist has to propose his detailed method to the Institutional Review Board (IRB), a group made up of both scientists and non-scientists. They strongly consider the ethical impact and potential harm of the research before giving any approval. The science has to be proven to be ethical, necessary, and useful. For animal research, thanks to animal rights activists, the guidelines are often more strict than they are for human research. Every institution must have an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). The experiments must be original, have a specific purpose (or future benefit to society), and must minimize or eliminate any animal suffering. Moreover, the researcher has to show that their research cannot be done without the use of animal testing. There is an obvious necessity in asking questions about ethics in bioengineering. But it's important to point out that many of the examples in this talk are on the periphery of the ethics debate, not the norm. At least in the US, researchers are required to consider the ethical impacts of their experiments. More importantly, scientific research must first be approved by standards largely agreed upon by (the majority of) society.
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Nick Edwards
Posted over 3 years ago
What happens when her son wants to attend Barnard College?
Thanks for your reply. To be honest, I'm a scientist and didn't even know what a "business club" did. But I agree that it's unfair to promote the success of one sex and not the other. And yes, when you take history and other cultures into account (referring to your comment below), my own perspective is limited. However, in modern America, the tide seems to be changing. For a middle class white male, the frustration comes when you realize that you often need to be overqualified to gain employment, scholarships, admission to graduate school, etc. The frustrating part about "equal opportunity" is that the opportunities are elevated for some and depressed for others. Please don't get me wrong. I'm not saying that women should not be given more opportunities. I strongly believe that all people should have the same rights and privileges. But problems arise when any group is privileged over another, whether it's black/white, male/female, or gay/straight.
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Nick Edwards
Posted over 3 years ago
What happens when her son wants to attend Barnard College?
I agree. But, then do we tear down Male Only institutions? Or build up Female Only institutions? Or both? Why should we applaud his decision not to participate in the business club? It doesn't make sense to advocate exclusivity for one gender (female) and condemn it for the other (male). This is my main criticism of the feminist movement. Rather than creating equality, it tends to polarize an already difficult situation. P.S. Maybe I should have put this in the "Debate" category