Kevin Ringeisen

Kingwood, TX, United States

About Kevin

Languages

English

Comments & conversations

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Kevin Ringeisen
Posted over 3 years ago
Advertising.......is it still worth the money ?
Recently I read an article about BMW's new commercial. The commercial flashes before moving on to the next. During that flash, though (which goes by unnoticed) the words BMW are imprinted on your eyesight if you close your eyes. (Same concept is behind seeing purple spots after staring at the sun). BMW claims its not subliminal messaging because you are aware you are watching a BMW commercial. Anyway, they said it wouldn't be run in the U.S.A. As far as efficiency goes, a lot of the best commercials don't even advertise the product. A string of recent Geico commercials will prove this. They are short clips about idioms such as "A woodchuck chucking wood" and "A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush". Completely irrelevant to car insurance, of course, but so long as the prospective commercial remembers the commercial, they're good. Other advertisements will at least feature the product but will do so only outrageously (see doritos commercial with the pug played during the superbowl). In Chicago (I believe) anonymous people began putting up huge posters with an image of a white cane with an entwined snake on a black background. No words, just the image. More and more began popping up around the city, on benches in parks, in the subway. People begin wondering what they are. Then BAM! press release. It's advertising the new season of House - it's the snake from the caudexi which represents the medical committee entwined around the cane House limps around on. The whole city has no idea what's being advertised to them which makes the final reveal that much more powerful.
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Kevin Ringeisen
Posted over 3 years ago
Why censor, should we not be able to self-regulate?
Talking about comments in general, some sites have a "hidden due to inflammatory speech etc" with a button that will let you see it - if you want to. I find this preferable. most of the time when it's just straight out censored, I'm more curious about what the person said that garnered such a long list of comments on it. Voting policies turn into the "ad populum" rule where, on democratic principles, censorship can be upheld. Internet discussions also, oddly, have a tendency to get heated in a way only politicians do nowadays. For that reason, flagging and censorship is prevalent elsewhere (I'm thankful the conversation is normally very rational and calm here). In the end, I liked freedom of speech before all this technology. Back then you had truly free speech and you could say what you wanted when you wanted. However, if someone disagreed completely, they challenged you to a pistol's-duel to the death. The result was freedom of speech + the requirement to think twice before you speak.
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Kevin Ringeisen
Posted over 3 years ago
Ali Carr-Chellman: Gaming to re-engage boys in learning
My opinion on the topic doesn't really hinge on whether or not videogames are a good idea, but why do so in the first place? We've already seen something similar with reading. People say "boys today are unruly, fidgety, don't pay attention, and have no interest in 'booky' things." So they emphasize this: "Get them reading. Then worry about the content." What you end up with are books like Captain Underpants. If we "meet the students where they are" you end up with books like "The day my butt went psycho." As a result, you begin the emphasize the wrong things (such as the act of reading over content) in education while simultaneously pushing a view of boys as kids only interested in farts and boogers. I agree that interactivity and some principles of gaming might benefit (the kinds that also benefit girls) schooling but using such things as a medicine puts the wrong emphasis on it. But this still, ONLY if it also comes with a healthy dosage of getting the kids to shape up. By catering to the student, you may be getting them off of ritalin but education in general is likely to suffer.
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Kevin Ringeisen
Posted over 3 years ago
What is the true value (if any) of organized schooling?
I agree about the community centers merging with schools. I find that ad-hoc organizations (which are really just informal gatherings with a general purpose - but no leader) are very effective, both for learning and a variety of other uses. I especially like your use of the phrase "subject silos" However something as organic as that cannot be compulsory, which is the biggest problem facing education - how to ensure that everyone receives an education while simultaneously making them want one. As soon as it becomes optional, some will not attend which is a dangerous proposition to a country that wants to entertain the idea of equality in all of its citizens.
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Kevin Ringeisen
Posted over 3 years ago
What is the true value (if any) of organized schooling?
You say the current school system teaches students to adapt. I'd argue that this adaption it's teaching, is not how to survive the world, but how to survive school. Adapting here means exiting the educational system relatively unscathed. On the governmental note - Government is supposed to be unbiased and not push any agenda. Because public schooling is funded by the government, in can be argued that they are overstepping their boundaries. And, ultimately, I would argue that it isn't the government's *obligation* (though, it is currently their job), it relies on the individual to ensure their education - as it actually does in a great part of the nation where public schooling is just plain inadequate. The current system pushing the proper process of acquisition of knowledge (classroom, 9-5 hours, etc) rather than the actual acquisition of it itself (which means an autodidact's education is invalid everywhere). I'd like to end, though, on another note. I have, of course, benefited from institutionalized education. Which means I shouldn't bite the hand that feeds me. While I agree with you that the system can be beneficial, it could be so so much better than it is now and we should consider the fact our educational model hasn't changed an inch since the 1840's and 50's and the world was a much different place back then.
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Kevin Ringeisen
Posted over 3 years ago
Improve Critical Thinking in the US' education system - mathematically as well as linguistically
Ah! Welcome to Texas then! I'm also a Texan, been here 10 years and am a senior in high-school. I also agree with you (But I do have to point out that Texas is either last or second-to-last education wise. The rest of the country isn't quite so bad, even if it does suck nationwide). This is partly due to the politics and bureaucracy of teaching, where failing a student means a teacher's ineptitude (erroneously, of course). This means students go on to the next grade even when they shouldn't. (I did the math on the statistics they are required to give to students at my school and when you account for the number of students passed "via committee" grades 8 and 12 should sit at around 300% the size of the other high school years.) Because of the horrible state of this nation's education, I became an International Baccalaureate student. Though a great deal of American students are unprepared for it (Because it tests on european standards, and as far as I'm aware, students begin physics in middle school over there and no sooner than junior or senior year here, there is a large knowledge gap) it's still doable. It's not perfect of course, but it does help alleviate the issues you are facing. I'm constantly facing similar issues but there are ways around them - I am, for example independently studying Chemistry HL (the 2nd year of college level Chemistry, 3rd year overall). Coupled with the advanced language programs (and the fact ,the teacher's role is much more hands off leaving the intellectual work up to the student) I'm glad IB sidesteps a lot of problems with the public school system and in my opinion supersedes it completely.
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Kevin Ringeisen
Posted over 3 years ago
How do we get our youth to admire Hawking, Gates, and Jobs instead of Lebron, Tom Brady and Justin Beiber?
I'm a senior in high school and I'm just frustrated by the apathy and disdain for knowledge in general. I've never seen such a society that could stigmatize vocational type work *and* hold intellectual work in such contempt. Though from my understanding, Tocqueville even saw hints of the latter. I've actually had a friend of mine (and very intelligent to boot) actually ask the class: "Who here actually cares about learning?" On top of that, I've got to deal with an educational system that just doesn't promote higher-level thinking.Too many times do I have to read books on my own time to find anything interesting to the point that calling it "recreational reading" is almost a fraud. More like autodidacticism. People don't need to be gung-ho on Shakespeare or all about Homer though. Aristotle mentions that there's a difference between admiration and idolatry (Where the former amounts to a role model proper, and the latter the kind of sensationalist personas in the media). Some people in the media are great (Marilyn Monroe, for example). Sadly, today's media presence has almost nothing that can be admired, only mimicked. However, on one point I will disagree when it comes to getting young people to read and be involved in culture etc. The argument is to get them reading and worry about content later. It's sort of a gateway drug argument in that regard. The problem is is that it creates whole markets aimed specifically that these people (things like captain underpants and the gross-out novels about adolescence). Because of things like these, young people are seen as unteachable (especially boys) because they're just not interested in that "dry" sort of stuff. It's ironic, because the Greeks taught boys exclusively to be pillars of their civilization. Today, they're sedated, "unteachable", and more interested in farts and boogers than culture. I think that whole representation of the child has to be done away with until progress can be made.
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Kevin Ringeisen
Posted over 3 years ago
What is the true value (if any) of organized schooling?
I'd like to reference the Royal Society for the Advancement of the Arts (a British organization similar to TED). http://comment.rsablogs.org.uk/2010/10/14/rsa-animate-changing-education-paradigms/ In the video, the speaker mentions something - the fact that today's schooling is still based on the outdated industrial revolution. Whereas I wouldn't go so far as to say the parallel englightenment period thinking should be done away with, there are some considerations that should be made. The speaker made the following points: 1.) Public schools were designed for the industrial revolution and in the image of them. 2.) You've got factory type schedules (Think how bells mimic shift-changes for factory workers) 3.) You've got compartmentalized departments (For example, is statistics math or social science? Knowledge doesn't have an intrinsic line of demarcation and we should be emphasizing interdisciplinary thinking in todays age. 4.) Students are created in batches (classroom) where their - apparently - most important commonality is the year of manafacture (See how students are grouped together as class of 2011, or 2012. This inadequately explains real learning differences between students of the same age). 5.) Finally, no student is the same and a society that aims at creating a standardized human population will not survive, especially today. Ford's assembly works great with building cars but when it comes to people, you quickly begin to realize that some come pre-built, some with parts missing, some even without instructions. Some of the same parts go in different places for different students. It's like saying a one-size fits all t-shirt is going to fit an octopus. To answer the question, I do have concerns about publicly mandated schooling, and about the way such programs fit into democracies in general. There is way too much of a distinction between school and life. The two aren't naturally separated and to doing so just increases the tension of the student.
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Kevin Ringeisen
Posted over 3 years ago
Salman Khan: Let's use video to reinvent education
A good idea, but there are other things to consider - quality control is one. by doing them all himself he ensures that they'll be up to his standards without having to downright reject videos that probably had a lot of work put into them. Another factor is that some students do use the website extensively. By opening the video-making door to others, it's the equivalent of having a different teacher every 20min (no matter how brilliantly they teach). He's got to keep a strong, centralized core to this learning environment and branch out there (peer to peer interaction etc.)
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Kevin Ringeisen
Posted over 3 years ago
Salman Khan: Let's use video to reinvent education
Those videos free up hours of precious Socratic dialogue in class with a fully interactive individual (ie teacher). Personally, I think Socrates would be offended by the thought that such "Socratic dialogue" could be done with a video in such a way. Having a machine iterate a "common misconception" completely bypasses the role of the individual in Socratic thought. By watching these videos outside of class, a child can enjoy a truly bilateral conversation in class. (I would also like to point out that videos such as Kahn's are supplemental to the teacher. The post-test study in the above video completely ignores the role of the teacher, both in teaching in general, and in fixing misconceptions). "Would you go to a doctor who graduated from Khan School of Medicine?" I wouldn't. Would I, however go to a doctor who graduated from an accredited university with appropriate residency and post-grad study who also used outside-classroom references to bolster his education? You betcha. And, beside the point, these were 5th and 7th graders he was talking about. No one is advocating replacing higher education with such a thing. And personally, a high-school diploma from the Kahn academy is probably worth more than a regular one in a lot of places considering the state of the public school system. On top of that, the Kahn Diploma would come with a statistics package which shows explicitly the content of the knowledge mastered, when it was mastered, how it was mastered, the curriculum used, and so on. That sounds like a much more accountable education method than the "No Child Left Behind" standardized testing they keep implementing.