Erik Richardson

Teacher, Richardson Ideaworks, Inc.
Milwaukee, WI, United States

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106386
Erik Richardson
Posted over 1 year ago
What is the Medium in which Multiple Universes Exist? How do they move around and interact? What is beyond the Multiverse?
Fun question. Let's consider this: to imagine a space between them - we'll call them universe 1 and universe 3, for reasons that will be apparent shortly. When we try to break that experience of "spatial distance between two objects" down, inevitably means that some time passes by as we appear to move in relation to other objects. To know we had left our universe (1), the experience of time would change from what it was inside universe 1 to some time flow 2. While in time flow 2, if we seem to move relative to some objects, then we would, in fact be in universe 2. If we then moved from time flow 2 time flow 3 (the next bubble), we would contrast that to time flow 1 and time flow 2. Now if there is a time flow and some objects during 2, then we would be in a universe, not between universes. This is sort of like the geometry axiom that between any two points, there is another point, except writ very large. If there is not a passage of time or movement in relation to objects in our movement from bubble 1 to bubble 3, then it makes no sense to suggest any space between them. Consider that there is no "dead space" in a mountain of soap foam, it's all full of bubbles (you could say the space between bubbles is empty, but if it is a space enclosed by surrounding bubbles, it is, thereby, also a bubble. Of course, universe 2 could be larger, thereby containing U1 and U3, in which case we are not just talking about congruent bubbles, but the possibility of nested bubbles as well. The paradoxes created would resemble Inception with its different scales of time, more than any model of bubbles floating in some substance. Now this would be more complicated, because different laws of physics could be in operation as well, but you get the idea.
106386
Erik Richardson
Posted over 1 year ago
What can we do to make people in this digital age more empathetic towards one another rather than apathetic?
More sitting still AND more walking: 1.) a.-Something like zazen untangles the stress that pushes us to road rage and depression as well as the cognitive decline cause by being in a perpetual state of fight or flight. 1.) b.-it helps us let go of desparate craving for material stuff, which drives us to work too hard and to see people as just another commodity that is there for our benefit. 2.) Exercise also helps to release stress, improve positive chemical flow in the brain, and improve your sense of connectedness. Bonus points if you walk along a stream or through the woods.
106386
Erik Richardson
Posted over 1 year ago
How many languages should we learn in bussiness? which one we must have to learn?
I see some really good points, but most are based on convention and usage. What we should ask instead, are a few structural questions: 1.What is the learning/leverage load of a given language. For instance, if I learn French, it would take less time to learn than, say, Japanese (which I did learn in college), in addition, however, I would also have already learned a lot of the structure for other romance languages as well as being able to acquire vocabulary in the other romance languages due to cognates. Given that, we might find, hypohetically, that the time it takes to become fluent in Japanese, we could have learned 2 or 3 of the romance languages. 2.There is a reason to suggest Chinese, given population and rise to world prominence. However, if we look at the number of languages that use the Western alphabet, as opposed to the Chinese or Japanese systems, then we must consider that the time spent learning another Western language is of much higher carrover value than would be learning Chinese. 3.The last point I would make here has to do with the clarity of logic in word construction and tense formations. Here we would need to ask the linguists: Which has the most readily understandable and most streamlined set of rules for formation of new words, for borrowing new words from others, and for changing tenses of words. The future will most need the language which can adapt the fastest without becoming a linguistic version of Frankenstein's monster.
106386
Erik Richardson
Posted over 2 years ago
Is the cultural anthropological impact of technology and information changing?
Part of what we are starting to see—and will see more of—is that there is a universal maximum on the curve of information-technology's impact. People are moving from idea to idea and paradigm to paradigm faster and faster to feed the addiction for novelty, and the result is that the potential applicability of claims in a given paradigm is not being tested out in meat-space. The impact is that hope of change and optimism about potential disruption will accelerate, but actual progress on the ground will slow toward 0, and without competition among paradigms in anything more than a virtual arena, the evolution of infrastructure and superstructure will be stunted. The biggest change will be the decline of change - except within the system to support the novelty-stream of the armchair rationalists.
106386
Erik Richardson
Posted over 2 years ago
What would Homo Sapiens possibly evolve into?
Advances in neuropsychology and biofeedback technology (driving quality up and costs down to make it useful and accessible) will result in the ability to monitor and adjust our stress reactions, which will result in a vast number of societal and personal improvements including increased lifespan, decreased health-care costs, and greater levels of output/efficiency in almost every area of human endeavor.