Marisa Hammond Olivares

Educator - English Language Arts/ESL
Mcallen, TX, United States

About Marisa

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Languages

English, Spanish

Areas of Expertise

English Language Arts Education, Early Childhood & Childhood Education, Special Education & Technology, Language Acquistion, English as a Second Language, Autism - education and parent, Video & Web production - for education, Reading Comprehension - Literary Elements, Dance Choreography and Instruction

I'm passionate about

Reading Comprehension - Keeping literature alive! Education and advocacy in the world of autism. Brainstorming though the budget cuts in the world of education while also reaching struggling students.

Talk to me about

Improvements in education. Video productions for the classroom. Linguistics, Autism, Music and Dance. Potential grant projects in education.

People don't know I'm good at

PR & Optics (optician & optometry) I did International trade shows in New York & Las Vegas. I worked with Latin American buyers & Asian manufacturers. Federal grant writer & project director for AIDS.

My TED story

My goal is to be an active life-long learner. I expect this of my children as well as my students. I love researching ideas and analyzing point of view. It is easy to say that TED.com facilitates this for me. The conversations here are inspiring, thought provoking, current and ACTIVE. I inspire to effectively contribute while learning from others. One can only hope to be in the physical presence of a TED conference - or can they? Believe that you may achieve, Marisa

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

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Marisa Hammond Olivares
Posted about 3 years ago
How can we empower kids to reshape the education system? *A TEDActive Education Project Question*
Sometimes it's a punch in the gut, but I allow students to write critiques on the lessons we've covered. Perhaps this needs to be promoted on a regular basis. Also, it has been said time and time again that we underestimate our students. Perhaps campuses and districts could create a committee of students that critique and help develop the curriculum. Each content area could have a group of student ambassadors. Why not? Students need to be heard. Not only would the information for the campus promote chreflection and change it would be excellent in promoting voice, project management and various other skills in the students that participate. Time to THINK outside of the box. (so cliche but oh so true) Great thread, thanks - Marisa Note - teacher bashers. PLEASE don't underestimate your teachers. MANY are passionate about being effective. Resources are at times very limited. We are constantly trying to be creative. So for those that bash - please please please do not generalize. Don't let one "lazy - bad" teacher represent the whole.
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Marisa Hammond Olivares
Posted about 3 years ago
What "video techniques" have you seen help keep learning fun?
I will speak based on my personal experience as a teacher of 5 years. (I'll get to the video in a moment) I have always tried very hard to incorporate the needs and styles of all of my learners. For example, the kinesthetic, visual and tactile learner. Sensory details are a must. In other words, the video needs to also incorporate time for concept based discussion, brainstorming activities and so forth. I help the students create "foldables" and journals of the data they need to remember as well as gallery walls and word walls of other items they deem important. (I'm learning to let the students "run the show" while I facilitate and maintain a sense of structure and direction) As for technology - I LOVE my MAC. I usually start my lesson with keynotes (similar to power point). These are meant to introduce the topic and inspire discussion. Again, word maps, foldables and gallery walls are filled with discussion topics. From there I move forward with the video. I've received the best response when I incorporate music, animation and plenty of symbolism. Grant it, I teach ELA plus literature is full of tone, mood and symbolism so I have quite a bit to work with. I find that once students visualize and SEE what we've been discussing I'm more apt to get the "aha moment" from even the struggling students. Specifics, subtitles work, but timing is everything. You may want the image to "pause" while you bring in a star or arrow with the point/subtitle written into it. Don't assume the student is following along with their eyes. You may be making a point about one thing on a video but they are looking at another corner or image on the video. The trick is to model the skill, explain and repeat, hilite specifics all without sounding redundant, boring and condescending. Not exactly an easy task. It takes time, energy and focus to get these videos done. Be patient and check out other videos - youtube actually has quite a few. Best wishes on your endeavors, Marisa
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Marisa Hammond Olivares
Posted about 3 years ago
How will you take part in JR's TED Prize wish?
I'm trying to decide what would be an effective image to place on both sides of the border wall - between Mexico and the US. Also, Juarez, Mexico and El Paso have several views towards each other. Again, cannot decide what an effective image would be. Ideas? Sparks? Inspired to create a lesson around this for my class. I'll review border issues and show/explain the project. It will be interesting to see what my middle school students come up with. Our community is less than 15 miles from the border. I'll post outcomes if time allows. Thank you for starting this thread, Marisa
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Marisa Hammond Olivares
Posted about 3 years ago
How will you help students find their voice?
I am a fifth year ELA teacher. I've always been a promoter of "voice". Students MUST feel like they have a voice. How else can we expect them to take ownership of their own learning? Inquiry, goals and accomplishmens begin with voice. I'm also a fan of the IB programme. ( http://www.ibo.org/ ) . It offers students as well as teachers the challenge to meet the standards of the learner profile. ( http://www.ibo.org/programmes/slideh.cfm ) . We need to meet the growing demands of the world, technology and of course academia. Our particular campus strives to meet the needs of the IB student. Students are challenged to inquire, think, and reflect. Students are challenged to be principled (the key to self discipline as well as for collaboration). Lessons span beyond the classroom. Community projects are evaluated and chosen based on purpose, worthwhile contribution and effectiveness. Our hallways are plastered with projects, posters and quotes. Our hallways are always evolving - weekly. We see students congregating and discussing projects, as if in a museum. It is a beautiful and inspiring act to see. Students are strongly encouraged to be in the arts. We have a large music program. We have nice numbers in our band, choir and orchestra. Our art classes are amazing - the fruit of their labor is always on display or announced. Yes, you are correct. Each community has its own issues. Students need to identify, evaluate and help solve. Many adults underestimate the ability, creativity and potential innovations of a child. We need to continue to support their growth while evolving with our ever changing planet. I encourage you to also watch - http://www.ted.com/talks/kiran_bir_sethi_teaches_kids_to_take_charge.html How will I help them find their voice? By braisnstorming with my students,debating issues,seeking answers,develop projects,promote research,opening their eyes to the various evolutions. Inspire! Defend! Support!Best wishes on your endeavors, Marisa
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Marisa Hammond Olivares
Posted about 3 years ago
Is Salman Khan's idea of incorporating video in education the key to solving existing budget cuts? Is it learner friendly? Differentiated?
Jesse, I'm right there with you. Although, the actual production of videos and power points are time consuming I GAIN ten fold in the classroom. My students know that they can log in and watch the videos again and again at their own leasure. Many would be surprised to find that they actually do log back in and review and/or comment. Students are eagerly begging to help me create video lessons - I LOVE it!! I'm going to go ahead and allow them to create a lesson. I'll provide the potential "skills" that they can choose from. I have a large MAC in my classroom as well as access to a mobile cart of 30 mac laptops. Imovie and photo booth are VERY user friendly. I can't wait to see what they come up with. Also, our district is very supportive of technology in the classrooms. Aside from the general campus based "Teacher of the Year" they have now added "Technology Teacher of the Year". The winner of course gets the usual honors and recognition, but is also awarded the new IPad - how cool is that? I join you in the excitement of Kahn's talk. I look forward to the continued development of technology in the classroom. HOWEVER, it must be a healthy combination of curriculum based timelines and expectations. The goal should not be "to save money" but to develop the growth of our students in the competitive world of academia and technology. Videos alone will not suffice. Best wishes to you, Marisa
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Marisa Hammond Olivares
Posted about 3 years ago
Is Salman Khan's idea of incorporating video in education the key to solving existing budget cuts? Is it learner friendly? Differentiated?
Yes, Pat I've seen Mitra's work. However, we still need some sort of structure, timeline and/or curriculum. I love what his experiment shows. Students do seek out answers, but I still believe "Perhaps a healthy blend of video, live lecture and modeling followed by hands on activities would be best." I'm a fan of concept based learning and I enjoy making my lessons "student centered" as opposed to "teacher centered". My students know I have high expectations. They are welcome to develop conclusions, but they must be defended and based on fact. I love to challenge them with the standard who, what, when,where, how, and why questions. They in turn LOVE to "try to prove me wrong". Every session ends with praise and analysis of the outcomes. Learning how to genuinely self critique is very important. Every student MUST feel like they have a voice and an opportunity to explain their point of view. I should also mention that I make videos as well. These are faily similar to what Khan has done, but in the area of literature, language and grammar. Fortunately, I have the liberty to select various texts. I especially enjoy using text from other subject areas. Students then realize the true importance of reading comprehension. Regardless, we still need a timeline of skills and expectations. Although I am not a huge fan of standardized testing we still need to evaluate growth and knowledge. Besides, you cannot get into a university without the SAT or ACT. I am very curious to see how our schools systems evolve over the next few years. I'm all for change, but it must be effective and valuable. I personally love the idea of incorporating videos. It is becoming very common practice at our campuse to sign up for the computer lab. We see this in all subject areas. I should note that these sessions are structured with expected outcomes. I can easily see how one would think a "lazy" teacher just throws the kids in front of a bunch of computers. This won't do. enough ranting
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Marisa Hammond Olivares
Posted about 3 years ago
Deb Roy: The birth of a word
The evolution of education is a hot topic right now. I began wondering what data we would find if we placed this system in our classrooms. Student and teacher responses could be analyzed. Sensory data could also enhance the data. Although it would be overwhelming, the data would be phenomenal in correcting our existing curricula. To find the style of delivery that is most effective for the learner is exciting. This has really opened many doors. Also, thank you for providing additional links and data. I'm very excited to see the evolution! Congratulations and best wishes.
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Marisa Hammond Olivares
Posted about 3 years ago
How do you see the future of literature? Do yo think that shorter forms such as poetry and microstories will gain more weight?
Although e-books are the obvious future I do not forsee the length of literature decreasing. However, we might start to see more short stories in the form of novelas. A series if you will. Long novels might evolve into 3 or 4 mini plots. Think Eclipse and Harry Potter. Both very successful in recent years. Also, both were successful films, but its greatest support came from the readers. Microstories in the form of anthologies seem likely. Quick-reads with an opportunity to continue when ready. Some replies mentioned attention span. Do a compare and contrast of ADD and "immediacy"- is it the nature of our evolving society and our technologies? Marketing is quick to feed our senses. Supply and demand are becoming more immediate. We are becoming more restless. (note, as a teacher I can say ADD and ADHD truly do exist. I need to deliver quickly and concisely in order to reach such children. Would it not make sense to apply this to the whole popluation? My fear however is that we might lose the beauty of diversity. I hate the idea of a cookie cutter society or mode of delivery) As for literature - I have been observing a few trends over the past few years. First, as an educator I have noticed that our most successful students read rather large novels. I've also noticed that these students are not only fond of literature they also enjoy math and science. Keep in mind that I teach at an IB middle school.Grant it, not all demographics are alike. However, I just happen to be the one teaching our struggling readers. They on the other hand HATE reading, but once I teach imagery, symbolism and add a few videos to the course they come alive. These students realize that they are very visual and begin to see reading in a whole new light. Another observation is when I travel. I am nothing less than a people watcher. I like seeing trends in stores, airports, flights and hotels. People are in fact buying books and reading. Many still flip through nice sized novels. Great thread!!