Paula Lovell

Austin, TX, United States

About Paula

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Languages

English

Areas of Expertise

education, small business, Depression and the pursuit of mental health, Caregiving

I'm passionate about

Movies, live music, education, psychology, politics, poverty, organ donation, caregiving

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

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Paula Lovell
Posted almost 3 years ago
JD Schramm: Break the silence for suicide attempt survivors
We actually lose more people to suicide every year than to murder. Contrary to popular belief, you will not cause someone to commit suicide if you bring up the subject. If you think someone you're close to might be suicidal, ask them. If their plans are imminent, take them to the hospital. If their plans/thoughts are more out in the future, make an appointment for them with their psychiatrist if they already have one, or find one for them if they don't. Let the doctors office know that your loved one is having thoughts of suicide and needs to see the doctor ASAP. Go with them to the doctor so you make sure they go to the appointment. If they don't have insurance, find out what kind of resources the county offers. Call 211 or look up at 211.org is a good resource. Again, time is of the essence and it's better to be safe than sorry. Do not worry about embarrassing them or thinking that you are invading their privacy. If you saw someone standing on a railroad track, you would push them off first and ask questions later. It's more important to keep them safe. Be their advocate. It's very hard when they are ill for them to take care of themselves.
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Paula Lovell
Posted almost 3 years ago
Eli Pariser: Beware online "filter bubbles"
Maybe we should be able to make a simple choice with the browsers. If we want the customized content, the "filter bubble" as it were we check Yes, keep doing what you're doing. If we want more diversity, we click "No", give it all to me.
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Paula Lovell
Posted about 3 years ago
Jeremy Rifkin: The empathic civilization
There is one thing that he doesn't address. While I agree that the vast majority of homo sapiens are empathic by nature, there are a certain percentage that are not. They are the predators of our society; the sociopaths, the serial killers, the corporate criminals and the uber-rich. They have no empathy for others. The operate entirely on self-interest and they have the capacity and the will to take advantage of the rest of the empathic society. That is why the uber-rich and the big corporations fight for additional tax breaks despite the fact that taxes are the lowest they've been in decades,while the rest of society suffers. To top it off, many have aligned themselves with the Religious Right, so their empathy, what little there is, is focused on others of their ideological belief system. This "empathy gene" only works to the benefit of mankind if 100% of people have it. When 1% don't, they just take advantage of the 99% that do.
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Paula Lovell
Posted about 3 years ago
Bill Gates: Mosquitos, malaria and education
One thing that Bill is assuming is that principals are the best judge of effective teachers. That's a huge leap of faith. Principals are just teachers that went to graduate school. They weren't necessarily good teachers themselves. They are often teachers that couldn't wait to get out of the classroom. In Texas for example, most secondary administrators are former coaches who have never taught an academic class in their life. Actually, in Texas, head coaches make more money than principals, so that means that most secondary administrators were MEDIOCRE coaches. Also, the "best" (favorite) teachers are rewarded with the honors classes. New and unpopular teachers are "punished" with the basic classes. Teachers are not encouraged to try new methods. They are required to "teach the test". Drop out rates are highest for low income students because many are forced to drop out by their parents to get a job and help support the family. Their parents were likely drop outs as well. How do we break the cycle? Well for one thing, we improve the economy and build a stronger middle class. We provide age appropriate sex education, including education on contraception, to cut down on teenage pregnancies. We put more money into work/study programs so that high school students can learn a well paid skill like auto mechanics, construction, hair styling or plumbing. Not every student is meant to go to college or can afford to. High school programs where students learn a trade keep them in school instead of dropping out. We could offer flexible schedules so that high school students who must work can still go to school part time. It doesn't take a genius to figure out that one size doesn't fit all, yet that is what we continue to offer students.
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Paula Lovell
Posted about 3 years ago
What is the next big essential service governments in the future will provide for their citizens?
The biggest reason that healthcare cost is going up is because it's run as a for profit business. Humana, Aetna, United Healthcare, etc. all have to answer to shareholders quarterly. If the profit motive were eliminated, healthcare wouldn't cost nearly as much. We have "socialized" law enforcement and fire departments and no one seems to be pushing to privatize them because they WORK. We might as well have socialized healthcare because the way it is now, those who have insurance pay for those who don't. Our emergency rooms are overrun with poor parents bringing their kids in with runny noses that should be treated at lower cost clinics. If someone who is uninsured comes in with a broken leg, it has to be fixed. If they don't pay their bill, it just rolls into the cost of running the hospital and rates go up for those who have insurance. Have you heard of any hospitals going out of business? Me neither!