Kiersten Thomsen

Circle Pines, MN, United States

Someone is shy

Kiersten hasn't completed a profile. Should we look for some other people?

Comments & conversations

Noface
Kiersten Thomsen
Posted over 4 years ago
Ken Robinson: Do schools kill creativity?
Beth, I also became sad while listening to Sir Ken Robinson. Just listening to him talk about education and what it looks like on the outside looking in, made me feel sad and almost ashamed that education has become this way. In a sense I feel embarrassed about what education has come to value. However, at the same time, I am also determined because I do not want my students to go through school without learning to be creative. To me, that would be the worst failure. So, even though phy. ed., music, and art may be pushed out of school I will find a way to keep that alive in my classroom because students need that education; they need to have the experience of the arts because that will help them find their talents and learn to appreciate what others may love. They will learn to use their creativity which will benefit them in the future, because who knows what our future will bring. We must prepare our students for whatever they may face in the future.
Noface
Kiersten Thomsen
Posted over 4 years ago
Ken Robinson: Do schools kill creativity?
I agree that our schools need to take some more risks towards being creative. I like what Sir Ken Robinson said about that all schools over the country have a hierarchy of which subjects are more important than others. Math is considered the most important and the arts are at the bottom. He continued saying that what if all schools taught dance as much as they taught math? What a difference education would be if we focused more on the arts than on math and science. What a risk that would be in our educational world. In all the confusion of what to teach students and how to teach students, I just wonder if it will ever be solved? Will what Ken Robinson says ever be put in practice in every school in the country...in the world? Will adults ever put the facts and statistics aside and focus on a whole, well-rounded education that engages children in every area of development? What a risk that would be in education! Ken Robinson says at the end of his speech, will we ever see our children for the hope that they are? Our children are out future and we have no idea what our future is going to look like. Schools need to start taking risks and educating to the whole student, rather than to just certain parts.
Noface
Kiersten Thomsen
Posted over 4 years ago
Ken Robinson: Do schools kill creativity?
Lou, that is a great question..can an adult be taught to think creatively? My answer is I would hope so, but I think that as we grow up into adults, creativity is pushed aside and reality takes over. Sadly, facts and statistics are the enforcer in the adult world which is why creativity needs to be acknowledged, not only in children, but in adults as well. If creativity would be valued as much as facts then we would have a different educational world...the children in schools today would face a different curriculum and expectations. I guess we, as adults, need to see the value of creativity and channel that into students so they can grow up with the ability to be creative and as a result, help benefit our world through new inventions and ideas.
Noface
Kiersten Thomsen
Posted over 4 years ago
Celebrating and Inspiring Curiosity as a Key Component in Learning
I agree! Children do ask every question imaginable but once they enter schools, some schools more more than others, will stop them from asking those questions. At times I feel like children are robots and are going through the motions of having an education. But there are great schools and wonderful teachers who do appreciate questions and realize that asking questions emphasizes creativity. We must not forget those school and teachers because who knows what the future will bring; maybe how children learn today will drastically change.I like your last sentence and that you say adults, not just teachers, because it is also the parents and relatives jobs to keep children asking questions and forming ideas.
Noface
Kiersten Thomsen
Posted over 4 years ago
Let students be teachers and curriculum developers
Speaking specifically to elementary students, I don't think that they are educated enough to know what they have to be taught and how to be taught because they are still learning themselves. I think this can be applied in the classroom by asking the students how they like to learn, what is interesting to them, but schools have standards they have to meet and teachers are given what they need to teach, but teachers can ask the students how they would want to learn and what activities they would like to participate in. Similarly, as students enter high school and middle school, teachers have standards they are to teach by and especially now with the standardized testing there is little room for creativity. However, I think that if teachers teach the material according to multiple intelligences that the units being taught will be fresher, more fun and students will engage more because the teacher is taking time to teach to each individual who learns differently. I think that if we ask students what they want to be taught and ask their input on the curriculum, then we will get into trouble because at that age in life, students only know what they know; they don't know what else is out there and what else they need to be taught. However, again, we can ask them their input on what activities help them learn best and make learning fun, then integrate that into the material being taught.
Noface
Kiersten Thomsen
Posted over 4 years ago
Celebrating and Inspiring Curiosity as a Key Component in Learning
After listening to Sir Robinson, one comment that really hit me was students are taught to be afraid of being wrong, if saying a wrong answer. This aids in students losing their creativity because children are not being allowed to think, to generate questions. Instead, they are supposed to know the right answer and say only that because that is what the school, and some teachers, are looking for, as well as other children. Students today have lost the ability to generate questions, to think during a conversation or text and ask why. Students are so used to thinking a certain way that the art of creativity is being lost, the art of asking questions and forming unique ideas are being lost. Students are scared to do this because they are supposed to have the right answer and only that. On the same lines, Sir Robinson said that we don't know what our world will look like when this generation of students retire and, we as teachers, are supposed to prepare these students for a world that we don't know; yet we are hindering their ability to be creative. I think that is crazy and backwards. We should be rewarding students for thinking outside the box because then students will flourish and go beyond their set expectations.