scott ohlrich

Palatine, IL, United States

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Comments & conversations

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scott ohlrich
Posted over 2 years ago
Katherine Kuchenbecker: The technology of touch
I have a feeling this could fix my slice in a matter of minutes! ( a "skill" that has taken me 40 years to perfect ). Trivial to the world, in light of the tremendous potential for this technology, but it would make an important aspect of my life so much more enjoyable...
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scott ohlrich
Posted almost 3 years ago
Wayne McGregor: A choreographer's creative process in real time
I can't help but think of the TED talks I've watched on the subject of synesthesia. This level of dance is a form of viewing and interacting with the world that I have trouble even imagining. Actually, any level of dance is mostly beyond my understanding. I do appreciate the freedom and beauty in their movement and I wish I could participate at even a rudimentary level.
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scott ohlrich
Posted almost 3 years ago
Scott Fraser: Why eyewitnesses get it wrong
This talk is too much like a court proceeding. A court of law is significantly different than a scientific critique. Mr. Fraser does much to convince us of his version of the truth and little to show the science involved. For example, his photographs are useless to show the actual lighting of the crime scene. He could have taken photographs at noon on a sunny day and adjusted the brightness and contrast to recreate the image he wants us to see. His main point regarding memories is understandable and I believe the science backs him up. I would have preferred to hear more about the science. But, his example from 9/11 may be totally false. Someone said in an earlier post that he may have been refering to the sight of the first plane hitting the building, that would have supported his theory much better. All in all I was disappointed with Mr. Fraser's talk, an unusual occurance for me on ted.com
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scott ohlrich
Posted almost 3 years ago
Is it better to try and to fail, or to never try at all? The latter!
Channeling my best Bill Clinton...it depends on the definition of "try." To me trying implies that the results are not definite and potentially fraught with failure ( and success! ). In the things that I am passionate about, I tend to move ahead without much concern about the outcome because I know I am committed. Failure will simply point me in a new direction and will not deter my enthusiasm. In those areas where I have little knowledge or interest, I tend to hesitate to move ahead because even smaIl failures will stop me in my tracks and keep me from new experiences.
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scott ohlrich
Posted almost 3 years ago
Rob Legato: The art of creating awe
I was wondering about the astronaut saying the film was wrong. His concern, as pointed out by Mr. Legato, would likely cloud (or influence) his perception. But, after watching a second time, I noticed that the film footage shows the gantrys from above moving away in succession, quite dramatically, rather than in unison. Could this be what he was refering to?
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scott ohlrich
Posted over 3 years ago
Where do you use math in your profession?
Having been a Firefighter/paramedic for 30 yrs I used math often and in a variety of ways, ie. calculating ratios of medication dosages to patient weight, water pressure friction loss in hoses, gallons per minute water flow from various nozzle sizes/ sprinkler heads/ hydrant ports, setting climbing angles for ladders (a simple rule of thumb for this one is: stand on the lowest rung and extend your arms out in front of you, you should be able to comfortably grasp the rung in front of you without stretching or bending your elbows), etc. But, what I found to be most advantageous was to be able to estimate well. It is a skill that most people seem to posess but are not often comfortable using. In the "real world", it appears to me, being accurate to 85 or 90% is good enough. In my work I estimated a lot of the time (emergent operations aren't always conducive to detailed analysis!). For example: How much of this structure is involved in fire and will it stay standing long enough for our crew to extinguish this fire? OR Do I have enough hose to reach from the engine in the street-through the front door-up the stairs-and into the rear bedroom where this fire is? Good estimating appears, to me, to be a matter of not just paying attention to the details but paying attention to everything, including the details. There is certainly a mathmatical basis to estimating and with practice estimating is a very practical skill to be used across most professions.
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scott ohlrich
Posted over 3 years ago
What idea is worth creating a disruption & what, who, where, how would you disrupt?
Alison, I think you've hit the mark with becoming "familiar with my discomfort". Coming change ( detected by recognizing our discomfort ) slaps us in the face all the time but we don't always rise to the challenge, hence Brett's question. Brett. To answer your question, I'd say that in those moments where I begin to feel the twinge of discomfort I try to evaluate the risk. Most of the time the real risk is quite minimal and being a bit uncomfortable myself or challenging someone elses status quo can be enjoyable. Kind of like riding a roller coaster, we'll come out safely on the other side. But, those times where the risk is substantial ie. loss of a friendship, relationship or someone is in physical danger, The brave rise to those occasions, acknowledge their discomfort and move forward anyway. Courage is not the absence of fear, courage is realizing there are some things more important than your fear.