Edward DeMarco

Alexandria, VA, United States

About Edward

Bio

Former foreign policy editor for Bloomberg in Washington.

Languages

English, Turkish

An idea worth spreading

GiG -- Global Innovation Game on Facebook. The idea market for the world's challenges.

I'm passionate about

Games and international relations

Comments & conversations

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Edward DeMarco
Posted over 4 years ago
Should we ask kids to help us solving the real world problems? And if yes, how?
Pietro, I invite you to check out GiG (global innovation game)...young people from 19 countries are playing, taking on real-world challenges in a real-time virtual market for the emerging global ideas economy. Buy, back and bash your way to the top of the market using our iCaps virtual currency. Coming soon: our GiG4Good feature, which will trigger deeds for good worldwide based on GiG content. Find us at: facebook.com/playGiG (click Go to App)
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Edward DeMarco
Posted over 4 years ago
How do we reduce single use and disposable plastics in our package, production and supply streams and move towards a sustainable world?.
An important topic and one the world's brainpower should be able to solve at some level, in short order. Also, we've plugged this into GiG as a challenge. GiG is the virtual stock market for the emerging global ideas economy, wrapped in game features. How do you rate as Influencer, Socialite, Investor, Ambassador? Exclusively on Facebook: facebook.com/playGiG. Check us out and play this imporant challenge inspired by Dianna.
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Edward DeMarco
Posted over 4 years ago
Which relevant/important events currently unfolding around the world are being ignored by the media? Why are they relevant?
Totally agree. Huge emerging story, which I've seen up close recently. See Feb. 28 report by American Enterprise Institute demographer. It predicts that the largest share of the increase in the world labor pool next 20 years will be in Africa. In the last 20 years, the big contributors were India and China. Political and social implications of this prediction are substantial. See also my contribution above on how we can bring slow-motion stories like this to light.
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Edward DeMarco
Posted over 4 years ago
Which relevant/important events currently unfolding around the world are being ignored by the media? Why are they relevant?
Bruno this is an issue I wrestled with a lot as a foreign policy editor, where each day I looked across the world at what was happening and tried to assign weight to developments. The media business is competitive and therefore thrives on this-just-in and on stories with lots of tension. It doesn't do slow-motion stories well. Not enough tension, not enough daily movement. This is a structural problem, yet but it's also a distribution problem. It's not sufficient to decree from on high that, hey world, you better start paying attention to this issue that's really vital. What needs to happen is to find those in the world who are passionate about that issue and then use them to make the rest of us care. The current media model isn't built for that kind of dynamic interplay. It's a one-to-many model for the most part, with very limited feedback. I believe that social games are an emerging media construct that can help with this problem of the underreported stories. Games? What is DeMarco talking about? Games are about play, interaction and what-ifs. The 21st century media audience will not only expect to be engaged directly in a story, it will demand to be engaged. It's about community. That audience will itself bring these lesser known stories to light, with the context that makes a wider audience care. I invite you to check out a game I'm developing with veteran games builders called GiG (short for Global Innovation Game) on Facebook. It's still embryonic, and we're still working out the tricky business of building what amounts to an idea market in the frame of game play. But it's a start. We're putting a lot of content into the game around environmental issues because this is a classic slow-motion story of major importance but often difficult to tell in its many parts. And the environment is a cross-border issue, and increasingly we're dealing with an internationally aware (young) audience eager to adopt solutions from around the world. So, see the game and GiG It!
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Edward DeMarco
Posted over 4 years ago
We spend 3 billion hours a week as a planet playing videogames. Is it worth it? How could it be MORE worth it?
Yes, games can be more worth it. That's why this former foreign policy editor has teamed with award-winning games developers to put GiG -- Global Innovation Game -- on Facebook. It plays as an idea market for the world's challenges. Still embryonic but growing and a great place for TED conversationalists to engage on topics from politics to the environment to corruption.Escapist games are great but we want to use fun and energizing game play as the vehicle for building communities of interest and interaction across borders. We want to build social games that matter in the real world. This is the natural evolution of games -- a new mediumfor turning the virtual into the real.