Max Wedding

Portland, OR, United States

About Max

Bio

Just a student who loves hearing other people's stories.

Languages

English, Spanish

Areas of Expertise

Prose Style/Editing, Stained glass, Fractal Art, Immigration/Migration, The Internet

I'm passionate about

Human rights and dignity, most of all. I love exploring why we think the things we think and do the things we do.

Universities

Kalamazoo College

Talk to me about

The Gay Rights movement. The US/Mexico border. The food system. A good short story.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

101450
Max Wedding
Posted over 3 years ago
what happens after death?
Is there even a method in existence of observing this? Because if you're looking for scientific fact without the correct instruments to log quantifiable results, you're only going to be getting opinions back at you.
101450
Max Wedding
Posted over 3 years ago
Is true gender-neutrality/genderlessness possible?
I don't really agree with you that the evolutional histories and hormonal balances make the foundation our gender identities. Sex identities, sure, but not gender -- I think that a concept that's been pretty much fabricated by humans throughout history. Whether or not we can make it past the women-give-birth-and-men-don't point is something I always tend to rub up against, though. Like, can we have different biological functions but neutral societal spaces within those differences? And what of transfolk or anyone else who aren't within the M/F binary?
101450
Max Wedding
Posted over 3 years ago
Is true gender-neutrality/genderlessness possible?
I'm totally with you on the gender-indifference, and I do think we're on the right track. Rocks my world whenever I genderfuck and somebody couldn't care less. But we're nowhere near where we need to be. The fact that feminism is still an f-word is testament to that. I guess I'm just wondering what society would look like if the concept of gender had never been invented, or if it were uninvented somewhere. Not that I think either is necessarily possible, but it's an interesting question for me.
101450
Max Wedding
Posted over 3 years ago
How do you see the future of literature? Do yo think that shorter forms such as poetry and microstories will gain more weight?
I disagree -- many short stories give the reader ample opportunity to fall in love and sympathize with the characters involved, if done correctly. I end up loving Anders by the end of "Bullet in the Brain", and if it were any longer than it is, it would do something drastically different than it does. Not any better or worse, just different. And if poetry doesn't give writers a chance to "play around", I don't know what does. A lot of contemporary poetry works hard to subvert the traditional concept of sentence structure, and once you deconstruct a thought down to its essentials as poetry tends to do, you can build it back up however you want without the constraints of typical subject>predicate>direct object sentence. Not saying that novels can't do this, but novels have to sustain an engaging voice for a far longer period of time, and the brevity of voice that short forms allow for readers to engage a type of voice, many novels would fail at attempting.