Gregory Conley

Buffalo, NY, United States

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Gregory Conley
Posted over 3 years ago
Let students be teachers and curriculum developers
Great point. In the way I was describing it, I was referring to teachers as those who are professional educators. Tutors on the other hand are not necessarily professionals. When I referred to the teacher, I would expect them to lead in teaching. Tutors help the teacher reach students in unique ways that teachers cannot. Teachers have the responsibility to educate using theory and strategies. Tutors could be those in the process of learning theory and strategies. If they so choose, they could be in the process of learning to become a teacher. In this case, tutoring is something specific, while teaching is not.
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Gregory Conley
Posted over 3 years ago
Let students be teachers and curriculum developers
I think this is a great point, and something that's actually been written down in theory. I'm currently in my second sociocultural theory class. We talk at length about mediation in learning. The change is quite simple and certainly not radical. Here's my take on it: 1. Create curriculum thinker groups. three groups of three students (nine total). In each group, you have a high achiever, medium achiever, and a low achiever for a particular subject area or class. In preparation for the following school year, invite those children to partake in reformulating the curriculum. The mixed groups will allow for more attention to various levels of students. Bring the three groups together to collaborate and finalize curriculum decisions. This could be a two-day event at the end of a semester or school year. 2. Give high achieving students the ability to tutor, not teach. It would kind of be an insult to the profession if students were teaching and not teachers with Masters Degrees in Edu (New York State). High achieving students are great as tutors because they might be better at differentiating instruction than some teachers. Being the same age enables the higher achieving student to recognize issues and problems a teacher may miss.